Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Edition Géza Anda (III) – Schumann | Chopin

23409 - Edition Géza Anda (III) – Schumann | Chopin

aud 23.409
Bitte Qualität wählen

Edition Géza Anda (III) – Schumann | Chopin

The third volume of the Géza-Anda-Edition by audite with recordings from the archives of the WDR, hitherto unpublished on CD, is dedicated to Anda’s performances of works by Schumann and Chopin which were already celebrated in the 1950s. This compilation features several core pieces of Anda’s...more

Robert Schumann | Frédéric Chopin

"This is a collection of essential recordings of one of the most outstanding pianists in the fifty and sixty decades of the last century." (critic-service.de)

Track List

Please choose the preferred audio format:
Stereo
Surround
Quality

SchumannKreisleriana, Op. 16 Géza Anda

SchumannSymphonic Etudes, Op. 13 Géza Anda

SchumannCarnaval, op. 9 - Scènes mignonnes sur quatre notes Géza Anda

Chopin24 Préludes op. 28 Géza Anda

Chopin12 Etüden op. 25 Géza Anda

Multimedia

Informationen

The third volume of the Géza-Anda-Edition by audite with recordings from the archives of the WDR, hitherto unpublished on CD, is dedicated to Anda’s performances of works by Schumann and Chopin which were already celebrated in the 1950s. This compilation features several core pieces of Anda’s repertoire. These recordings are a perfect example of Anda’s pianism and musicianship: structural intelligence and sound shaping are combined with an extraordinary sense of drama, proportion and inner stability, making these interpretations a historical and artistic document, even five decades after their production.

Added to this volume of the Anda edition is a beautifully hued performance of Schumann’s Romance Op. 28, 2 from 1960 which is released here for the first time.

The historical publications at audite are based, without exception, on the original tapes from broadcasting archives. In general these are the original analogue tapes, which attain an astonishingly high quality, even measured by today‘s standards, with their tape speed of up to 76 cm/sec. The remastering – professionally competent and sensitively applied – also uncovers previously hidden details of the interpretations. Thus, a sound of superior quality results. CD publications based on private recordings from broadcasts cannot be compared with these.

Reviews

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung | 28. Juli 2009, Nr. 172, S. 30 | Eleonore Büning | July 28, 2009 Ein Troubadour des Klavierspiels
Géza Anda ist nicht nur das probate Vorbild bei Mozart und Bartók. Schon vor fünfzig Jahren spielte er Schumann, Liszt, Chopin, Rachmaninow klar und leuchtend

Donnern genügt nicht. Sicher braucht es immer auch die Vehemenz einesMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Donnern genügt nicht. Sicher braucht es immer auch die Vehemenz eines

Fanfare | Issue 32:4 (Mar/Apr 2009) | Steven E. Ritter | March 1, 2009

For those with only a tangential or cursory familiarity with the art of Géza Anda, it may come as somewhat a surprise to hear that he was anMehr lesen

For those with only a tangential or cursory familiarity with the art of Géza Anda, it may come as somewhat a surprise to hear that he was an acknowledged expert in the music of Schumann and Chopin. Remembered today primarily (in the popular mind) for his recordings of Mozart (especially from the movie Elvira Madigan) and more notably his affinity for Bartók, his inclusion in the pantheon of greats performing Romantic music seems tentative at best; yet it cannot be denied that this aspect of his art has been singularly ignored by the current generation, and his name is rarely mentioned as influential.

This is a sad thing, for Anda has much to contribute to our current understanding of these composers. Hearing the razor-sharp and crystal clear Schumann on these discs, I am surprised once more at his ability to bring a modern sensibility to these works while simultaneously injecting a sense of old world Romanticism that is on par with about anything I have heard from pianists past. In fact, if current research is to be believed (I know, that opens up a whole kettle of sometimes smelly fish), then what the more ascetic players bring to this music may actually be more in line with the way the composers themselves used to play it. But I shall not pigeon-hole anyone into that construct either, being a firm believer that each generation must discover these composers for themselves.

Anda certainly did that, albeit helped by a number of people who provided him with a plentitude of unerring role models: Dohnányi, Kodály, and Weiner at home, and Haskil, Cortot, and Fischer in Paris. Haskil particularly comes to mind as you listen to the perfectly proportioned upper and lower lines of Kreisleriana, for instance. It is always a shocker to hear how many pianists downplay the significance of the bass line in Schumann, which is absolutely critical in any legitimate performance. Anda ignores none of it, and knows its importance, as did his friend and colleague Clara Haskil; their performances of this music are remarkably similar and equally illuminating, Anda having the edge in conciseness while Haskil demonstrates the buoyancy inherent in Schumann’s work.

The Chopin is also well worth rediscovery. I do not think that this composer spoke to Anda in the same way as some others, certainly not Schumann. The Romantic ethos is still there, but Chopin was a miniaturist in a way that Schumann rejected, and his short-burst works do not allow the performer as much time to develop an emotional argument. Anything the performer wants to say must be prepared completely before the first note sounds, and sometimes I feel that Anda needs more of a warm-up period. But more often he is fully prepped for the challenge, and when that happens, as in most of the preludes, we are in for some magical moments upheld by a technique that is second to none.

Audite presents these pieces in wonderful mono sound, the type that initially made some people skeptical of stereo, clean, clear, and almost—almost—sounding two-channel. This is a great tribute (Volume 3 of 4) to a vastly underrated artist, and an early candidate for this year’s Want List.
For those with only a tangential or cursory familiarity with the art of Géza Anda, it may come as somewhat a surprise to hear that he was an

Neue Musikzeitung
Neue Musikzeitung | 12/08 - 57. Jahrgang | Hanspeter Krellmann | December 1, 2008 Von der poetischen Auflösung der Musik
Géza Anda beim WDR Köln: zur neuen Gesamt-Edition bei audite

Er [Geza Anda] verfügte geradezu beneidenswert über die Begabung, Musik jeder Ausrichtung poetisch aufzulösen und ihr auf diese Weise eine nach innen wirkende Sensation zu sichern.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Er [Geza Anda] verfügte geradezu beneidenswert über die Begabung, Musik jeder Ausrichtung poetisch aufzulösen und ihr auf diese Weise eine nach innen wirkende Sensation zu sichern.

Die Presse
Die Presse | 20.10.2008 | Schaufenster | Wilhelm Sinkovicz | October 20, 2008 Mozart erlesen, Bartók kongenial

Als Bartók-Interpret ist er eine Legende, als feinsinniger MozartspielerMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Als Bartók-Interpret ist er eine Legende, als feinsinniger Mozartspieler

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | October 2008 | Jed Distler | October 1, 2008

Audite's third of four double-CD sets devoted to Géza Anda's Cologne RadioMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Audite's third of four double-CD sets devoted to Géza Anda's Cologne Radio

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | September 2008 | Ingo Harden | September 1, 2008 Von Paderewski bis Gulda

Immer mehr alte Klavieraufzeichnungen auf Schellack, Klavierrollen und Rundfunkbändern finden den Weg in die CD-Kataloge. Eine Revue der wichtigstenMehr lesen

Immer mehr alte Klavieraufzeichnungen auf Schellack, Klavierrollen und Rundfunkbändern finden den Weg in die CD-Kataloge. Eine Revue der wichtigsten CD-Überspielungen aus der Flut der vergangenen Monate im Schnelldurchgang.

Um mit einer angreifbaren, aber empirisch bewährten Hypothese zu beginnen: Wer mit Lust und Freude Platten sammelt, den wird es früher oder später auch zu „historischen“ Aufzeichnungen ziehen: weil die Beschäftigung mit neuen Aufnahmen über kurz oder lang neugierig macht auf das, was vorher war. Und weil Emil Berliners und Edwin Weites Erfindungen die Möglichkeit eröffnet haben, sich jetzt immerhin schon in die akustische Vergangenheit eines ganzen Jahrhunderts zurückzutasten.

Allerdings muss der Hörer beim Abhören alter Aufnahmen kompensieren können. Denn erstens bewahren besonders die frühen Schellacks wegen ihres begrenzten Klangspektrums und Pegels nur ein farbschwaches Abbild der tönenden Realität. Und zweitens waren die musikalischen Vorstellungen unserer Altvorderen noch stark vom ganzheitlichen Eindruck jeder Aufführung bestimmt. Vom akustischen Erscheinungsbild erwartete man offenbar bis in die 1940er Jahre noch nicht zwingend Perfektion nach heutigen Vorstellungen; frühere Konzertbesucher waren besser darauf eingerichtet, sich Fehlendes und Intendiertes ergänzend aus den optischen Signalen des Interpreten zu erschließen.

[…]

Sonderstatus besitzt dagegen die Berliner Aufnahme des c-Moll-Konzerts mit dem 75-jährigen Wilhelm Kempff: vorhersehbar gänzlich unheroisch, aber immer luzide geistreich und spontan. Und was für ein guter Dirigent war Maazel, als er noch nicht so deutlich zeigte, dass er sich dessen allzu sehr bewusst war!

Die Audite-Musikproduktion Ludger Böckenhoffs, dem diese Erschließung zu danken ist, stellt gleichzeitig eine ausführliche „Edition Géza Anda“ vor, die auf acht CDs Aufnahmen aus dem WDR-Archiv, vorwiegend aus den 1950er Jahren, publik macht. Sie ist wertvoll vor allem durch die Interpretationen der großen Romantiker-Werke, die der Dreißiger Anda fabelhaft „werktreu“ konzentriert und mit hervorragendem (und hervorragend eingefangenem!) Ton spielte. Die Edition ist das überfällige Gegengewicht zur Mozart-Serie der DG, die das gängige Anda-Bild bisher einseitig einfärbte.
Immer mehr alte Klavieraufzeichnungen auf Schellack, Klavierrollen und Rundfunkbändern finden den Weg in die CD-Kataloge. Eine Revue der wichtigsten

CD Compact
CD Compact | Septiembre 2008 | Verónica Maynés | September 1, 2008 Audite Edition Géza Anda

Si el lector es uno de esos melómanos sibaríticos y exigentes, que estáMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Si el lector es uno de esos melómanos sibaríticos y exigentes, que está

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | September 2008 | Michael Tanner | September 1, 2008

Listening to Géza Anda, playing such a widely contrasting range of composers (including Mozart in the May issue and Bartók in August), has been aMehr lesen

Listening to Géza Anda, playing such a widely contrasting range of composers (including Mozart in the May issue and Bartók in August), has been a source of almost undiluted enjoyment. There appears to be a vast archive of recordings in Cologne of concerts he gave for the radio, mainly without an audience. Although the discs to hand were recorded in the 1950s, and are in mono, the sound is rich and on occasion plummy. It sounds as if Anda favoured a Steinway or comparably velvety instrument. That works better for some of these composers than others, though we are now used to hearing the Viennese classics played on an instrument with a more incisive upper register.

The Beethoven Concerto, numbered as '1' but second in order of composition, is conducted by Anda, and the orchestra proves highly responsive. This radiant and exhilarating work gets as lively a performance as it deserves, and could easily be a first choice for anyone who isn't addicted to state-of-the-art sound. It's followed by a straightforward rendition of Beethoven's first large-scale piano sonata, which Anda is careful not to over-dramatise; and then he plays the elusive, ground-breaking Op. 101, which, thanks to its seemingly improvisatory character, gets mauled by many pianists. Anda plays it spontaneously, but without searching for effect.

The directness of his playing is one of its most attractive features, and is as rewarding in Chopin and Schumann as in classical repertoire. The extraordinary freshness of both these composers, in their approach to form, signalled by the capricious titles that Schumann often gave his works, and the very general ones which Chopin awarded his, comes across quite marvellously in all these performances. Anda wasn't an exploiter of extremes, so if you want the unbridled fury of the last of Chopin's Op. 28 Preludes go to Argerich; or to Richter to unleash a volcano in the penultimate Etude Op. 25. But listened to as whole sets, Anda offers unfailing insights, gives new life to numbers that can sound tired, and left me purring with satisfaction at such lack of ostentation. Anyone who thinks Romantic music has to be played with flamboyance should listen to the Liszt and Brahms here and will soon develop quite different priorities.
Listening to Géza Anda, playing such a widely contrasting range of composers (including Mozart in the May issue and Bartók in August), has been a

klassik.com | August 2008 | Dr. Daniel Krause | August 24, 2008 | source: http://magazin.k... Vollendung

Géza Anda ist vergessen, an ungarischen Pianisten ersten Ranges herrschtMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Géza Anda ist vergessen, an ungarischen Pianisten ersten Ranges herrscht

Gramophone
Gramophone | August 2008 | Bryce Morrison | August 1, 2008 Even if the Beethoven doesn't stand out there's plenty of Anda's artistry here

These recordings dating from 1955-69 and taken from the West German Radio Archives celebrate the artistry of Géza Anda whose tragic death at the ageMehr lesen

These recordings dating from 1955-69 and taken from the West German Radio Archives celebrate the artistry of Géza Anda whose tragic death at the age of 54 extinguished a light that could never be replaced. In an age of well trained automata set to shine briefly on the competition circuit, Anda's was a wholly personal voice backed by pianism and craftsmanship of a transcendental sheen and precision.

True, virtually all the works included here on Vols 2 and 3 are duplicated on Testament's nine-CD reissue of Anda's early EMI Londonbased recordings. But duplication is hardly the issue because although Anda had a clear ground-plan for his interpretations, they could fluctuate with subtle differences dictated by circumstances and the mood of the moment. Nothing is radically different yet side-by-side comparison tells us that Anda was essentially a recreative artist who altered his readings as some new diamond-like facet of a work caught his imagination. True, his Beethoven remains for all its quality more reasonable than revolutionary (though quite without the disfiguring quirks of, say, Gould, Mustonen or Pletnev). Yet if his playing becomes brilliantly alive in the finales of both sonatas, he finds his truest voice in Chopin, Brahms, Liszt and, most of all, Schumann. Here he is every inch the virtuoso who uses his phenomenal agility and ear for sonority and texture to such effect that everything emerges in its first pristine light.

Personal idiosyncrasies abound (why such a rapid spin through the central lento of Chopin's "octave" Etude; why such an uncharacteristically flustered way with the E major Prelude's ceremonial tread?) yet they remain like spots on the sun. Few more scintillating or tightly coiled Liszt Sonatas exist and who but Anda could capture Schumann's schizophrenic moodswings, his play of light and shade, so vividly or acutely? Try the third and ninth etudes from the Etudes symphoniques and you may well wonder when you have heard such light-fingered enchantment. Anda's way with two of the five additional posthumous etudes is so magical that you wish he had played them all. His inclusion, too, of "Sphinxes" in Carnaval (written in order not to be played!) is an amusing addition to his coruscating wit and elegance.

Audite's recordings have come up well and, hopefully, Anda's discs of Beethoven's Third Concerto, Franck's Symphonic Variations (among his own favourites), Chopin's Second Sonata and Ravel's Valses nobles et sentimentales will become more easily available.
These recordings dating from 1955-69 and taken from the West German Radio Archives celebrate the artistry of Géza Anda whose tragic death at the age

Arte
Arte | 8. Juli 2008 | Mathias Heizmann | July 8, 2008 Géza Anda

Eine Handvoll CDs, ein CD-Player, ein paar Liter Benzin, und es kannMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Eine Handvoll CDs, ein CD-Player, ein paar Liter Benzin, und es kann

Audiophile Audition
Audiophile Audition | July 02, 2008 | Gary Lemco | July 2, 2008

The third in a series of four 2-CD sets devoted to Hungarian virtuoso GezaMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The third in a series of four 2-CD sets devoted to Hungarian virtuoso Geza

Diapason
Diapason | juillet-août 2008 | Etienne Moreau | July 1, 2008

Les archives des studios de la Radio de Cologne et de son orchestre (aujourd'hui WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln) n'ont pas fini de nous livrer leursMehr lesen

Les archives des studios de la Radio de Cologne et de son orchestre (aujourd'hui WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln) n'ont pas fini de nous livrer leurs inestimables secrets, cet hommage à Geza Anda (1921-1976), entièrement constitué d'inédits, en est la preuve. Le premier volume permet de retrouver le pianiste hongrois dans Mozart, qui fut l'amour de sa vie et qu'il défendit sous la baguette des plus grands chefs, ici Keilberth, Silvestri, Gielen, puis seul, dirigeant la Camerata Academica du Mozarteum de Salzbourg. Dans tous les cas, son Mozart est superbement – et toujours subtilement – dramatisé, grâce à une présence, une vie, des creusements, une âpreté qui n'ont jamais rien de joli comme cela était si souvent le cas à l'époque : un exemple à méditer pour les mozartiens d'aujourd'hui.

Le volume suivant comporte un Concerto n° 1 de Beethoven en public, volontaire et lumineux, et surtout deux sonates qui font regretter que Geza Anda n'ait pas persisté dans la voie du Maître de Bonn, tant le résultat est convaincant par sa clarté et sa finesse. La sonate de Liszt et la Sonate n° 3 de Brahms sont l'occasion de montrer quel grand pianiste il fut, attiré par la lumière des aigus comme dans des Intermezzi d'un Brahms chauffant ses vieux os au soleil, ici magnifiquement et sobrement restitués.

Les Schumann (Vol. III) sonnent juste, comme chaque fois avec Anda, même si on peut leur préférer les enregistrements commerciaux, plus aboutis, publiés chez Deutsche Grammophon quelques années plus tard – Carnaval excepté. Les Préludes de Chopin sont d'un classicisme et les Etudes d'une épure – une seule et même grande arche – qui en disent long sur l'intelligence du style et sur les capacités intellectuelles et instrumentales du personnage.

Le dernier volume, consacré à Bartok, montre Geza Anda dans son élément, qu'il s'agisse des concertos, fins et aériens (particulièrement le deuxième avec Fricsay), ou dans la Suite op. 14 aux harmonies vif-argent, comme improvisée avec ses allures de folklore inventé. La Sonate pour deux pianos et percussions en compagnie de Solti est passionnante tandis que les Contrastes revendiquent leur modernité avec une clairvoyance qui achève de convaincre, s'il était besoin, de l'immensité du talent d'un artiste disparu bien trop tôt.
Les archives des studios de la Radio de Cologne et de son orchestre (aujourd'hui WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln) n'ont pas fini de nous livrer leurs

Crescendo Magazine
Crescendo Magazine | N° 94 - Été 2008 | Bernard Postiau | July 1, 2008 Une édition Geza Anda chez Audite

On ne louera pas assez l'éditeur Audite de consacrer une série de huitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
On ne louera pas assez l'éditeur Audite de consacrer une série de huit

Scherzo
Scherzo | Julio 2008 | Rafael Ortega Basagoiti | July 1, 2008 De Pianistas: Géza Anda
Audite (distribuidor Diverdi) edita una colección en cuatro volúmenes, cada uno con dos discos, dedicada al pianista húngaro Géza Anda.

El volumen 1 (Audite 23.407) contiene obras de Mozart (Conciertos n°sMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
El volumen 1 (Audite 23.407) contiene obras de Mozart (Conciertos n°s

SWR
SWR | Treffpunkt Klassik, 17. Juni 2008 | Lydia Jeschke | June 17, 2008

Heute mit Lydia Jeschke am Mikrofon und mit neuen Produktionen klassischerMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Heute mit Lydia Jeschke am Mikrofon und mit neuen Produktionen klassischer

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | Juni 2008 | Alain Steffen | June 1, 2008 Unschätzbare Anda-Sammlung

Da es nicht sonderlich viele Aufnahmen des genialen ungarischen Pianisten Géza Anda gibt, besitzt diese Hommage für den Sammler einen unschätzbarenMehr lesen

Da es nicht sonderlich viele Aufnahmen des genialen ungarischen Pianisten Géza Anda gibt, besitzt diese Hommage für den Sammler einen unschätzbaren Wert. Auf 8 CDs erleben wir Anda als einen überragenden Gestalter und Interpreten. Wie wandelbar er sein konnte, wie flexibel und wie natürlich er seine Interpretationen seinen Partnern anpassen konnte, das zeigt die CD mit den Mozart-Konzerten auf eine wundervolle Weise. Darüber hinaus gehört die dynamische, in allen Ecken funkelnde Aufnahme des Klavierkonzerts Nr. 22 KV 482 mit Anda und Constantin Silvestri zu den schönsten des Katalogs. Bei Keilberth (Konzert Nr. 21 KV 467) optiert Anda für einen ganz anderen, romantischeren und runderen Klang, und bei den beiden Konzerten Nr. 20 KV 466 und 23 KV 488 dirigiert Anda selbst. Ebenfalls Raritätswert haben die Aufnahmen der Symphonie Nr. 28 KV 200 von Mozart und des 1. Klavierkonzerts von Beethoven, bei denen Géza Anda ebenfalls als überzeugender Dirigent fungiert. Die Solowerke für Klavier von Ludwig van Beethoven (Sonate op. 10/3 und op. 101) und Johannes Brahms (Intermezzi op. 117, Sonate Nr. 3) sind Musterbeispiele intelligenten Musizierens. Welche Schönheit, welche Tiefe Anda doch hier erreicht!

Auch bei Chopin findet der Pianist die musikalische Wahrheit hinter der Virtuosität und beweist, dass die 24 Préludes bzw. die 12 Etudes des polnischen Meisters alles andere als Salonstücke sind. Diskutabler dagegen scheint mir Andas Annäherung an Schumann. Anstelle von Fantasie setzt Anda größtmöglichen Ernst, was allerdings Stücke wie Kreisleriana, Symphonische Etuden oder Carnaval nicht immer ins optimale Licht rückt. Somit bleiben die Schumann-Werke in der Aussage etwas akademisch, wenn Anda spieltechnisch auch hier wieder eine Meisterleistung bietet.

Die vierte Doppel-CD ist Werken von Bela Bartok gewidmet und ist die vielleicht aufregendste Publikation der Serie. Anda spielt hier die beiden Klavierkonzerte, Nr. 1 unter der Leitung von Michael Gielen, Nr. 2 unter Ferenc Fricsay, mit dem er ja einige Jahre später alle drei Konzerte für Deutsche Grammophon aufgenommen hat. Andas frische und direkte Annäherung dieser früheren Aufnahmen zeigt den Pianisten weniger auf der Suche nach Wahrheiten als in der Auseinandersetzung mit Klang und Struktur. Somit wirken beide Konzerte zugänglicher, zumal sowohl der junge Gielen wie auch Fricsay mit der gleichen Stringenz vorgehen wie der Solist. Georg Solti ist Andas Partner in der Sonate für zwei Klaviere und Schlagzeug, ein rares historisches Dokument und darüber hinaus in einer dynamischen und vollblutigen Interpretation. Sehr schön auch die Klaviersuite op. 14, die Anda als einen genuinen Bartok-Interpreten ausweist, sowie die weniger bekannten 'Kontraste für Klarinette, Violine und Klavier' mit u.a. dem hervorragenden Tibor Varga.
Da es nicht sonderlich viele Aufnahmen des genialen ungarischen Pianisten Géza Anda gibt, besitzt diese Hommage für den Sammler einen unschätzbaren

Musica | musica 197, giugno 2008 | Riccardo Risaliti | June 1, 2008

Il tempo che passa inesorabile livella e oscura, indebolendo i ricordi. ChiMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Il tempo che passa inesorabile livella e oscura, indebolendo i ricordi. Chi

Classica-Répertoire
Classica-Répertoire | juin 2008 | Jacques Bonnaure | June 1, 2008

Le volume III reprend des concerts radiodiffusés des années 1954-1960.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Le volume III reprend des concerts radiodiffusés des années 1954-1960.

Schwäbische Zeitung
Schwäbische Zeitung | Nr. 117/2008 | man | May 21, 2008 Geza-Anda-Edition aus WDR-Archiv

CDs mit Geza Anda sind Raritäten. Mit der neuesten, 3. Folge seinerMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
CDs mit Geza Anda sind Raritäten. Mit der neuesten, 3. Folge seiner

www.classicstodayfrance.com
www.classicstodayfrance.com | Mai 2008 | Christophe Huss | May 17, 2008

Pour ceux qui ne connaissent pas le pianiste hongrois Géza AndaMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Pour ceux qui ne connaissent pas le pianiste hongrois Géza Anda

www.critic-service.de
www.critic-service.de | 35 | Christian Ekowski | May 7, 2008

Die Dokumentation mit Einspielungen des Pianisten Géza Anda war notwendig.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Dokumentation mit Einspielungen des Pianisten Géza Anda war notwendig.

Piano News
Piano News | 3/2008 - Mai/Juni | Carsten Dürer | May 1, 2008

Gleich zwei Reihen von CDs mit Aufnahmen des legendären ungarischenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Gleich zwei Reihen von CDs mit Aufnahmen des legendären ungarischen

hifi & records
hifi & records | 2/2008 | Stefan Gawlick | April 1, 2008 Pianistische Hausapotheke
Lust auf Klaviermusik? Diese Aufnahmen lohnen sich allemal

Nein, das Wort der »Referenzaufnahme« will ich hier nicht bemühen,Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Nein, das Wort der »Referenzaufnahme« will ich hier nicht bemühen,

Diverdi Magazin
Diverdi Magazin | N° 168 / marzo 2008 | Pablo-L. Rodríguez | March 1, 2008 El camaleón del piano
Audite lanza una impresionante colección In dedicada al eximio pianista húngaro-suizo Géza Anda

Géza Anda (1921-1976) llegó a hacer planes para dirigir una Tosca de Puccini poco antes de su muerte. ¿Sorprendente? Pues no, porque Anda, ademásMehr lesen

Géza Anda (1921-1976) llegó a hacer planes para dirigir una Tosca de Puccini poco antes de su muerte. ¿Sorprendente? Pues no, porque Anda, además de haber sido un "trovador del piano" para Wilhelm Furtwängler o de representar el "'epítome de la elegancia pianística" para Bryce Morrison, fue ante todo un músico desconcertantemente completo cuya madurez fue drásticamente truncada por el cáncer a los 54 años. No es fácil etiquetar su arte, aunque Wolfgang Rathert lo intenta hacer en su magnífico ensayo publicado dentro de la carpetilla de estos nuevos lanzamientos de Audite: "Una extraña combinación de clasicismo, expresividad, racionalismo y obstinación". Y no es éste un mal intento, habida cuenta de la riqueza que se esconde tras sus interpretaciones de Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, Brahms, Liszt y (por supuesto) Bartók. Anda goza hoy de una gran consideración a pesar de que su nombre sea omitido en la mayor parte de las monografías especializadas sobre pianistas. De hecho, en las notas de los últimos lanzamientos discográficos importantes a él dedicados (The Great Pianists of the 20th Century en Philips y Géza Anda. Troubadour of the Piano en DGG) encontramos textos de Peter Cossé y Jeremy Siepmann que coinciden en muchos aspectos o acuden a la escueta nota que de Anda publica el New Grove.

En realidad, existe tan sólo una monografía sobre este gran pianista suizo de origen húngaro que fue publicada por Hans-Christian Schmidt en 1991 bajo el curioso y objetivo título de Geza Anda: Sechzehntel Sind Auch Musik! Dokumente Seines Lebens (Zúrich: Artemis & Winkler). Se trata de una recopilación de comentarios y documentos encaminada a profundizar en la filosofía interpretativa de Anda que nació bajo el auspicio del concurso pianístico trienal que lleva su nombre en la capital suiza. En ella encontramos muchas claves para entender el arte de Anda (o "su espíritu", como lo denomina Schmidt) que parten de la idea de que su concepción de la música iba más allá de los problemas técnicos de su instrumento o de las limitaciones de un repertorio concreto. De hecho, el fin último de su interpretación pretende alcanzar el nivel dialéctico para presentar un texto objetivo por medios subjetivos, y ello es lo que le permite alcanzar un perfecto dualismo (imposible para otros pianistas) entre la pasión y robustez propias de Florestán y el intimismo lírico de Eusebius en sus interpretaciones de Schumann o le ayuda a encontrar la claridad necesaria para Mozart como resultado de un acercamiento muy profundo e intelectual a este compositor, o incluso lograr el equilibrio necesario en Bartók al atender no sólo a lo escrito en sus partituras como compositor sino también a las particularidades de él como pianista.

Y es que para Anda tocar el piano era una forma de intelectualidad y de reflexión filosófica. A diferencia de otros pianistas, él no fue un niño prodigio y quizá ello le permitió concentrarse más en el enriquecimiento de su personalidad artística que en el mero fortalecimiento de sus dedos. En esto último encontraría apoyo tanto en su maestro, Ernö von Dohnanyi, como también en varios colegas mayores como Clara Haskil, Alfred Cortot o Edwin Fischer, o incluso también en el filósofo Pierre Souvchinsky. Desde luego, la principal faceta de su arte reside en la capacidad innata que alcanzó Anda para adaptar su interpretación al estilo de cada compositor, pues prácticamente nunca uno encuentra en un mismo pianista acercamientos tan válidos y profundos a compositores y estilos tan diversos.

Ciertamente, la discografía de Géza Anda ha aumentado bastante en los últimos años. Lanzamientos de Testament, Hunt, Orfeo, BBC Music, Tahra, Idis, Col legno, Archipel o Golden Melodram han engrosado la lista de sus registros fonográficos a partir de archivos radiofónicos, que se suman a sus registros oficiales para EMI, DGG y RCA disponibles hoy en su gran mayoría. Sin embargo, muy pocos sellos han reparado en lo conservado de Anda en las corporaciones radiofónicas de la antigua República Federal alemana (la NDR, WDR, SWR, SR, BR, HR y la RIAS berlinesa) o, por lo menos, desde la frustrada edición en LP dedicada a este pianista por Ariola-Eurodisc en los setenta. Audite nos redescubre la figura de Géza Anda centrándose tan sólo en uno de estos archivos, el de la Westdeutscher Rundfunk de Colonia (WDR), y publicando en cuatro entregas de dos discos un total de veintidós obras concertantes, solistas y camerísticas de Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Liszt, Schumann, Chopin y Bartók en su mayoría muy representativas del arte de Anda. Todos son registros inéditos en CD, realizados entre 1952 y 1969, cuya calidad va de lo aceptable a lo excelente, debido al buen estado de las cintas conservadas, a los nombres de los responsables técnicos de las mismas (en especial a Hans-Georg Daehn y a Heinz Oepen) y también a la labor de remasterización de Stephan Schmidt.

El primer volumen se dedica a Mozarr y en él encontramos cuatro conciertos muy característicos del repertorio de Anda junto a la rareza de una sinfonía interpretada bajo su dirección. En el Concierto n° 23 y la Sinfonía n° 28, Anda dirige a la Camerata Academica de Salzburgo, una formación con la que dio el salto de tocar dirigiendo en 1960, consiguiendo materializar con ellos su Mozart elegante, cantable y encantador (aderezado aquí con cadencias propias) y con la que grabó la pionera integral concertante para piano del salzburgués en los sesenta para DGG (siguiendo el ejemplo y la influencia de Edwin Fischer). No obstante, además de sus interpretaciones dirigiendo (se incluye además otra del Concierto n° 20 con la orquesta de la radio) sus colaboraciones con otros directores también fueron fructíferas, como queda patente en el mágico Andante del Concierto n° 21 dirigido por un inspiradísimo Joseph Keilberth en 1956.

El segundo volumen se consagra a Beethoven, Brahms y Liszt. Para empezar, Anda no fue un pianista especialmente beethoveniano, pues tan sólo tocó y grabó cinco sonatas y cuatro de sus conciertos (además de las Variaciones Diabelli y el Triple Concierto), aunque ello no quiere decir que su Beethoven sea menos interesante. Sin duda, entre lo más destacado de este volumen se encuentra su vienesa interpretación de su Primer concierto pianístico, tocando y dirígiendo en 1969, junto a una de las versiones más concentradas, bellas y misteriosas del Largo e mesto de Sonata n° 7, registrada en 1955. Las grabaciones intimistas de Brahms se suman a las realizadas en los cincuenta para EMI (Testament) y la gran sorpresa la encontramos en la Sonata de Liszt de 1955, que deja a un lado su registro del año anterior (Testament) y ahonda en lo narrativo, exquisito y dramático de esta música.

El tercer volumen incluye Otras dos especialidades de Anda: Schumann y Chopin. Sus versiones del primero son hoy todavía muy admiradas, especialmente por lo que tienen de mixtura entre la austeridad y objetividad clásica y la sensación de fluir continuo, de libertad, en una palabra. Al mismo tiempo, en sus interpretaciones destaca un transfondo muy polifónico y contrapuntístico, que supone llegar a Schumann y a Chopin desde Bach. En cierto modo, si en la idea de tocar y dirigir Mozart hay una clara influencia de Fischer, aquí encontramos la huella de Cortot (en todos ellos estaría también la de Haskil). Ninguna de las versiones de la Kreisleriana, los Estudios sinfónicos o el Carnaval, o de los Estudios y Preludios de Chopin, tienen nada que envidiar a sus famosos registros de los cincuenta (Testament) o los sesenta (DGG), y aquí Anda es el verdadero paradigma de un artista universal que "da cuenta de la música por sí misma", como dijo de él el filósofo Gabriel Marcel.

Finalmente, el cuarto volumen se dedica al compositor donde las interpretaciones de Anda siguen siendo más influyentes: Bela Bartók. Hoy nadie duda de que Géza Anda fue quien introdujo en el repertorio los tres conciertos pianísticos de Bartók, que tocó cientos de veces (incluso los tres en la misma velada como atestigua el impresionante concierto muniqués de 1957 publicado por Col legno) y grabó brillantemente junto a Ferenc Fricsay entre 1960 y 1961 (DGG). Pues bien, en este disco Audite publica el primer encuentro entre ambos artistas, que tuvo lugar en Salzburgo en 1952 y que se saldó con la versión más rapsódica, fresca y neoclásica del Concierto n° 2 del compositor húngaro (en los archivos de la WDR hay otro registro posterior de ambos). El resto no desmerece lo histórico de este registro, especialmente al incluir dos sorprendentes tomas camerísticos de Anda de Contrastes y de la Sonata para dos pianos y percursión realizados en 1953 en colaboración con viejos compañeros de estudios y amigos de su Hungría natal como Tibor Varga y Georg Solti. Y es que, según parece, hasta 1976 – el año de su muerte – Anda no descubrió su vocación tardía por la música de cámara, tocando en Innsbruck el Quinteto "La Trucha" de Schubert. Si a esto sumamos sus proyectos como director de orquesta está claro que su prematura muerte nos privó de Anda para rato.
Géza Anda (1921-1976) llegó a hacer planes para dirigir una Tosca de Puccini poco antes de su muerte. ¿Sorprendente? Pues no, porque Anda, además

Merchant Infos

Edition Géza Anda (III) – Schumann | Chopin
article number: 23.409
EAN barcode: 4022143234094
price group: BCA
release date: 12. March 2008
total time: 147 min.

More from these Composers

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...