Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartok – The early RIAS recordings

21407 - Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartok – The early RIAS recordings

aud 21.407
Bitte Qualität wählen

Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartok – The early RIAS recordings

This anthology of Ferenc Fricsay’s splendid Bartók recordings for the RIAS Berlin documents a summit meeting of famous Hungarian soloists: the pianists Géza Anda, Andor Foldes, Louis Kentner and the violinist Tibor Varga. Fricsay’s time-tested and congenial vocal soloist, once again, is Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau.more

This anthology of Ferenc Fricsay’s splendid Bartók recordings for the RIAS Berlin documents a summit meeting of famous Hungarian soloists: the pianists Géza Anda, Andor Foldes, Louis Kentner and the violinist Tibor Varga. Fricsay’s time-tested and congenial vocal soloist, once again, is Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau.

Track List

BartókViolin Concerto (No. 2) (dedicated to Zoltán Székely) Tibor Varga | Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin | Ferenc Fricsay

BartókMusik für Saiteninstrumente, Schlagzeug und Celesta (dedicated to Basler Kammerorchester and its leader Paul Sacher) Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin | Ferenc Fricsay

Multimedia

Informationen

The project of a representative, possibly even complete, recording of Bartók’s oeuvre formed a part of Fricsay’s work from the beginning of his time in Berlin. These RIAS recordings feature almost exclusively Hungarian artists for the solo parts: a novelty at the time. In Fricsay’s view, Hungarian soloists were best suited to realising his precise concept of the close relationship between, on the one hand, Hungarian language and culture and, on the other, interpreting Hungarian music authentically. The only exception is Fischer-Dieskau, whom Fricsay much admired.
This compilation from 1951 until 1953 includes all surviving Bartók recordings from the RIAS archives with Fricsay. It begins with opus 1, the Rhapsody for piano and orchestra (1904) and conceived in an entirely Hungarian idiom, and goes via the expressionist, agitated Deux Portraits Op 5 (1907-08) and the powerfully optimistic Dance Suite (1921) up to the masterworks of the 1930s: the neo-baroque influenced Second Piano Concerto (1930-31), the archaic, fairytale-like and darkly coloured Cantata Profana (1932), the splendid Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta (1935), the lucid Second Violin Concerto (1937-38) and the mysterious Divertimento of 1939 with which Bartók marked the beginning of his inner farewell to Europe. Even today, more than sixty years after these recordings were made, Fricsay’s intensity is perceptible for the listener as an existential experience – both in the impetus and the positive power of the rhythm, and also in the mysteriously resigning and ironically contorted moments in this music which is so rich in nuances. This was made possible by the cooperation with other world-famous alumni of the Budapest Music Academy where Fricsay had himself studied: the pianists Géza Anda, Andor Foldes and Louis Kentner, as well as the violinist Tibor Varga. Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau joined Fricsay as a soloist in the opera Bluebeard’s Castle and the Cantata Profana. His singing (albeit in German) congenially corresponded to Fricsay’s ideal of dramatically thrilling and passionately precise Bartók interpretation.

There is a “Producer’s Comment” from producer Ludger Böckenhoff about this production available at http://www.audite.de/de/download/file/304/pdf.html.

The production is part of our series „Legendary Recordings“ and bears the quality feature „1st Master Release“. This term stands for the excellent quality of archival productions at audite. For all historical publications at audite are based, without exception, on the original tapes from broadcasting archives. In general these are the original analogue tapes, which attain an astonishingly high quality, even measured by today‘s standards, with their tape speed of up to 76 cm/sec. The remastering – professionally competent and sensitively applied – also uncovers previously hidden details of the interpretations. Thus, a sound of superior quality results. CD publications based on private recordings from broadcasts or old shellac records cannot be compared with these.

Reviews

Die Tonkunst | Juli 2013 | Tobias Pfleger | July 1, 2013 Edition Ferenc Fricsay – Werke von Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Rossini, Bizet, Brahms, Strauß, Verdi, Bartók u. a.

Ferenc Fricsay gehörte zu den bedeutenden Dirigenten des mittleren 20.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ferenc Fricsay gehörte zu den bedeutenden Dirigenten des mittleren 20.

American Record Guide | 16.10.2012 | David Radcliffe | October 16, 2012

The 1950s was the great decade for Bartok performances — would that the composer had been still alive! It was a remarkable recovery considering theMehr lesen

The 1950s was the great decade for Bartok performances — would that the composer had been still alive! It was a remarkable recovery considering the comparative obscurity of his last years. But the 1950s were also a dicey decade for the interpretation of 20th Century works, because success came at the cost of homogenizing performance practices that deracinated some of the more exciting elements in modern music. Ferenc Fricsay, much admired then and since, was both a champion of Bartok and of the mode of conducting then displacing the more spontaneous mode associated that earlier Hungarian conductor, Artur Nikisch. These museum-friendly performances, made in 1950-53, lack the warmth and rubato one might expect in “authentic” Bartok. Fritz Reiner is much racier in the Concerto for Orchestra.

The RIAS Symphony doesn’t help: they are competent in what must have been unfamiliar repertoire, but they certainly come across as Berliners: their sound is smooth and attractive but lacking in earth tones. That said, Fricsay’s soloists, Hungarian compatriots all, supply the necessary ingredients to make Bartok sing.

The concertos are all wonderful, particularly Tibor Varga in the violin concerto and Geza Anda in the Third Piano Concerto. Conceding that Bartok performances can work even in the mode of high-modernist abstraction, I much prefer the color and inflection that typified central European music-making in the composer’s lifetime. Since Bartok concertos are not heard so often now as in the 1950s, and since this collection has been admirably produced from original sources (studio and broadcast) it is well worth seeking out.
The 1950s was the great decade for Bartok performances — would that the composer had been still alive! It was a remarkable recovery considering the

WDR 3
WDR 3 | Freitag, 20.07.2012: Klassik Forum | Hans Winking | July 20, 2012 Historische Aufnahmen
Ferenc Fricsay dirigiert Werke von Béla Bartók

In Berlin nach dem 2. Weltkrieg wuchs mit dem 1946 gegründetenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
In Berlin nach dem 2. Weltkrieg wuchs mit dem 1946 gegründeten

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | N° 221 - 3/2012 | March 1, 2012 ICMA 2012: Historical Recording

Pizzicato: Supersonic – Fricsay hat Bartok nie weichgekocht, er serviert ihn uns in intensiv aufbereitetem rohen Zustand, mit viel Impetus und einerMehr lesen

Pizzicato: Supersonic – Fricsay hat Bartok nie weichgekocht, er serviert ihn uns in intensiv aufbereitetem rohen Zustand, mit viel Impetus und einer aufregenden Mischung aus Zynismus, Ironie, Resignation und leidenschaftlicher Beseeltheit.
Pizzicato: Supersonic – Fricsay hat Bartok nie weichgekocht, er serviert ihn uns in intensiv aufbereitetem rohen Zustand, mit viel Impetus und einer

DeutschlandRadio
DeutschlandRadio | 01.02.2012 | February 1, 2012 International Classical Music Award 2012 für historische Aufnahmen aus dem RIAS-Archiv
"Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartók • The Complete RIAS Recordings" ausgezeichnet

Die Edition "Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartók • The Complete RIAS Recordings" aus den Archiven des Deutschlandradios erhält den InternationalMehr lesen

Die Edition "Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartók • The Complete RIAS Recordings" aus den Archiven des Deutschlandradios erhält den International Classical Music Award (ICMA) 2012 in der Kategorie Historische Aufnahmen. Die CD-Box enthält zum größten Teil unveröffentlichte Aufnahmen des RIAS der Jahre 1950 bis 1953 mit Ferenc Fricsay und dem RIAS-Symphonie-Orchester, dem heutigen Deutschen Symphonie-Orchester Berlin. Sie wurde im Februar 2011 veröffentlicht und ist Bestandteil einer Reihe, die in Zusammenarbeit von audite mit Deutschlandradio Kultur bislang ca. 50 CD-Editionen hervorgebracht hat. Bereits vor zwei Jahren hatte aus dieser Reihe die "Edition Friedrich Gulda" mit dem MIDEM Classical Award eine hohe internationale Würdigung gefunden.

Die vorliegende Anthologie der Bartók-Aufnahmen Ferenc Fricsays für den RIAS Berlin dokumentiert ein Gipfeltreffen berühmter ungarischer Solisten: die Pianisten Géza Anda, Andor Foldes, Louis Kentner und der Geiger Tibor Varga. Fricsays bewährter und kongenialer Gesangssolist ist Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau. Der Dirigent Ferenc Fricsay gilt als authentischer Interpret der Werke Béla Bartóks, was dem Wert der Einspielungen zusätzliches Gewicht verleiht. In der klanglichen Präsentation überzeugt die Edition durch äußerst sorgfältiges Remastering der originalen Masterbänder.

Nach zahlreichen anderen Auszeichnungen, etwa dem "Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik" 2/2011 gewinnt die Edition "Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartók" mit dem International Classical Music Award (ICMA), dem Nachfolger des MIDEM Classical Award, nun eine der höchsten internationalen Auszeichnungen der Musikszene. Die Classical Awards werden jährlich von einer unabhängigen Jury vergeben, der Musikjournalisten führender internationaler Musikmagazine, Radiosender und Musikinstitutionen angehören.

Die Preisverleihung findet am 15. Mai 2012 in Nantes statt.
Die Edition "Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartók • The Complete RIAS Recordings" aus den Archiven des Deutschlandradios erhält den International

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | Dezember 2011 | Christoph Vratz | December 1, 2011 Empfehlungen unserer Mitarbeiter 2011

Historische Aufnahme des Jahres:<br /> <br /> Die Wiederentdeckungen beim Label Audite (etwa Ferenc Fricsay mit Bartók)Mehr lesen

Historische Aufnahme des Jahres:

Die Wiederentdeckungen beim Label Audite (etwa Ferenc Fricsay mit Bartók)
Historische Aufnahme des Jahres:

Die Wiederentdeckungen beim Label Audite (etwa Ferenc Fricsay mit Bartók)

www.opusklassiek.nl | december 2011 | Aart van der Wal | December 1, 2011

In het Berlijnse Titania-Palast (in mijn oren min of meer een akoestischMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
In het Berlijnse Titania-Palast (in mijn oren min of meer een akoestisch

Hi-Fi News | October 2011 | Christopher Breunig | October 1, 2011 Radio revelations
All Fricsays’ 1960s Bartók recordings made by RIAS engineers have been collected as an Audite set. In some ways they surpass the DG studio equivalents. Christopher Breunig explains why

Few music premieres have created such uproar as Le Sacre du printemps, given in Paris in 1913 under Pierre Monteux. Nowadays the score presents fewMehr lesen

Few music premieres have created such uproar as Le Sacre du printemps, given in Paris in 1913 under Pierre Monteux. Nowadays the score presents few problems either to conductors or orchestras; the same may be said of much 20th century music. But have we lost something along the way? It’s an argument often put by the critic Robert Layton – citing early recordings (such as those by Stravinsky) as evidence.

Look back 40 years to the 1961 Gramophone catalogue and there’s a substantial Bartók listing: six versions of the relatively popular Concerto for Orchestra, for instance – though none far better than the 1948 Decca 78rpm set by van Beinum. One name that recurs is that of the Hungarian conductor, signed to DG, Ferenc Fricsay. He was in charge of the RIAS Orchestra (Radio in American Sector, Berlin), with access to the Berlin Philharmonic for certain projects. Sessions were held in the Jesus-Christus-Kirche, which had excellent acoustics. The classical director of the orchestra Elsa Schiller invited Fricsay to Berlin in 1948; later she would become a key figure in organising Deutsche Grammophon’s postwar repertory.

The German company Audite has now issued a 3CD set [21.407] from radio tapes duplicating most of the DG material but with different soloists, eg. Foldes in the Rhapsody; Kentner in the Third Piano Concerto [live]. A 1953 studio Second with Géza Anda adds to his live versions with Karajan, Boulez, et al. There’s no Concerto for Orchestra or First Piano Concerto, but Audite offers alternatives for the Second Violin Concerto (Tibor Varga) [live]. Cantata profana (Fischer-Dieskau/Krebs), Dance Suite, Divertimento for strings [live], Two portraits (Rudolf Schulz) and Music for strings, percussion and celesta.

These RIAS recordings were also made in the Berlin church; the live tapes are from the Titania-Palast. The booklet note veers from dry facts to contentious opinion!

Some tape!
We all know that, as Allied bombers were flying over Germany, radio engineers were still tinkering with stereo and were able to record on wire (precursor to tape). The tape quality on DG mono LPs has always amazed me and in this Audite set there’s a prime example with the Third Piano Concerto. The levels were set, frankly, far too high and with the soloist rather close. But even when the overload is obvious, somehow it still sounds ‘musical’.

This is the performance which stands out for me as most significant. Louis Kentner, born in Hungary (as Lajos), had come to the UK in 1935, marrying into the Menuhin family, and had, with the BBC SO under Boult, given the European premiere of this work – they recorded it the very next day, in February 1946.

A Liszt specialist, he plays here with total aplomb, notably in the counterpoint of the finale. The ‘night music’ section of the Adagio religioso, instead of bristling with insects and eery rustles, sounds more akin to a Beethoven scherzando. His touch put me in mind of something the composer had demonstrated to Andor Foldes: ‘This [playing one note on the piano] is sound; this [making an interval] is music.’ The last two notes of movements (ii) and (iii) here are very much musical statements. Notwithstanding the limitations of the 1950 source, many orchestral colours struck me anew. In sum: this may not be a version to introduce a listener to the concerto, but it’s a version those familar with it should on no account miss. And it illustrates perfectly the thesis that today’s smoother readings lose something indefinable yet essential.

Brilliant illumination
Fricsay died aged only 49. If you don’t know his musicianship, the intensity in the slow movement of the Divertimento here (far greater than on his DG version) will surely be a revelation. He appeared, said Menuhin, ‘like a comet on the horizon … no-one had greater talent.’
Few music premieres have created such uproar as Le Sacre du printemps, given in Paris in 1913 under Pierre Monteux. Nowadays the score presents few

Scherzo
Scherzo | Jg. XXVI, N° 269 | Santiago Martín Bermúdez | August 1, 2011 Bartók y Fricsay: Históricos

Las grabaciones de obras de Bartók dirigidas por Ferenc Fricsay en laMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Las grabaciones de obras de Bartók dirigidas por Ferenc Fricsay en la

www.operanews.com | July 2011 — Vol. 76, No. 1 | David Shengold | July 1, 2011 Bartók: Cantata Profana (and other instrumental works)

Ferenc Fricsay (1914–63) was a master of many musical styles but broughtMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ferenc Fricsay (1914–63) was a master of many musical styles but brought

Fanfare | Issue 34:6 (July/Aug 2011) | Lynn René Bayley | July 1, 2011

This wonderful three-CD set presents itself as Fricsay’s complete recordings of Bartók’s music, yet the liner notes refer to DG studio recordingsMehr lesen

This wonderful three-CD set presents itself as Fricsay’s complete recordings of Bartók’s music, yet the liner notes refer to DG studio recordings of the Concerto for Orchestra and Bluebeard’s Castle, neither of which is in this collection. Curious.

What is present is, for the most part, marvelous, though the tightly miked, over-bright sound of the Violin Concerto No. 2 and the Divertimento for String Orchestra somewhat spoil the effect of the music. In both, the brass and high strings sound as shrill as the worst NBC Symphony broadcasts, and this shrill sound also affects Varga’s otherwise excellent solo playing. On sonic rather than musical terms, I was glad when they were over. The remastering engineer should have softened the sound with a judicious reduction of treble and possibly the addition of a small amount of reverb.

Needless to say, the studio recordings are all magnificent, not only sonically but meeting Fricsay’s high standards for musical phrasing. I’m convinced that it is only because the famous Fritz Reiner recording is in stereo that his performance of the Music for Strings, etc. is touted so highly; musically Fricsay makes several points in the music that Reiner does not. The liner notes lament that the Cantata profana is sung in German in order to accommodate two of Fricsay’s favorite singers, Helmut Krebs and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau. No matter, for the performance itself is splendid and, sonics again aside, it has never been surpassed.

In a review I previously wrote of a modern pianist’s recordings of the Bartók concertos, I brought up the Annie Fischer–Igor Markevitch recording of No. 3 as an example of what the music really should sound like. The Anda–Fricsay recording of No. 2 is yet another example. The music flies like the wind, none of the brass interjections or rhythmic propulsion are ignored, yet none of it sounds like a jackhammer chopping up the pavement of your brain. Indeed, the Adagio enters and maintains a particularly soft and mysterious sound world that is the essence of Bartók’s post-Romanticism. The notes take Kentner to task for glossing over “some of the intricacies of the fragile dialogue between soloist and orchestra in the middle movement” of the Third Concerto, but I find this a small if noticeable blemish in this live concert performance. Many of the orchestral textures completely contradict what one hears in the modern recording on Chandos, and even Kentner’s very masculine reading has more of a legato feeling.

If you take in stride some of the harshness in the live performances (particularly the violin concerto), you’ll definitely want this set in your collection. So much in these performances represents Bartók’s music as it should sound, and it should be remembered that Kodály, Bartók, and Dohnányi were Fricsay’s teachers at the Liszt Music Academy in Budapest. Historically informed performance students, take heed.
This wonderful three-CD set presents itself as Fricsay’s complete recordings of Bartók’s music, yet the liner notes refer to DG studio recordings

Classical Recordings Quarterly | Summer 2011 | Alan Sanders | July 1, 2011

This set contains all the surviving RIAS recordings by Ferenc Fricsay of Bartók's music (a 1958 recording of Bluebeards Castle was woefullyMehr lesen

This set contains all the surviving RIAS recordings by Ferenc Fricsay of Bartók's music (a 1958 recording of Bluebeards Castle was woefully destroyed). All the works listed above were recorded commercially by Fricsay and his orchestra for DG except the Cantata profana. The 1951 radio recording of this work has been issued before as part of a 1994 DG Fricsay Bartók collection in its "Portrait" series (C 445402-2). The sound in Audite's transfer is a little clearer, though this strange, complex composition does need more modern, stereo sound. Fricsay evokes a pungently dark, heavy atmosphere in a performance whose only defect is that it is sung in German instead of the original Hungarian.

Though the radio recordings of the remaining works all date from 1950-53 they are all more than adequate in sound – sometimes they are startlingly good. Varga's live recording of the Second Violin Concerto is the only failure in Audite's set. The soloist's playing is frankly very poor, since it is technically fallible, with bad intonation and an unpleasantly insistent, rapid vibrato, and as recorded Vargas tone quality is squally and scratchy. (In their "Portrait" issue DG offered Varga's commercial recording, made some months earlier. Here the playing is more accurate, but the unpleasant vibrato and undernourished tone are again in evidence.) It is a relief to hear Rudolf Schulz's solo violin performance in the First Portrait, for he plays most beautifully.

Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, with its separate instrumental groups, does really need stereo recording, but Fricsay's lithe, intense performance is superlative. In common with the Violin Concerto the Divertimento performance derives from a concert performance, rather than one prepared in the radio studio. Fricsay uses a big string group and neither intonation nor ensemble are accurate, but the performance is characterful – strong, poetic and full of energy. In the Dance Suite Fricsay, as opposed to Dorati in his equally authoritative but very different performances, is more flexible, less insistent rhythmically, and his tempi tend to be a bit faster. Two equally valid views of this appealing work.

Audite's third disc comprises works for piano and orchestra played by three pianists famous for their Bartók. Andor Foldes is given a forward balance in the Rhapsody, but not even his advocacy can convince me that this early, derivative work is an important item in the composer's output. Géza Anda's commercial stereo recording of the Second Concerto with Fricsay is familiar to Bartók admirers. In his 1953 performance the younger Anda chooses quite fast tempi in the outer movements, but Fricsay follows willingly, and the result is a fine combination of virtuoso playing and conducting. Both the poetic sections of the middle movement and its quicksilver elements come to life vividly. It's good to have such an important souvenir of Kentner's Bartók in the Third Concerto. He brings a satisfyingly tougher than usual approach to the work as a whole – nothing is 'prettified', and his performance and that of the orchestra are quite brilliant.
This set contains all the surviving RIAS recordings by Ferenc Fricsay of Bartók's music (a 1958 recording of Bluebeards Castle was woefully

Junge Freiheit | Nr. 26/11 (24. Juni 2011) | Sebastian Hennig | June 24, 2011 Behutsame Formbildung

Die Aufnahmen von Béla Bartóks Orchesterwerken durch dasMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Aufnahmen von Béla Bartóks Orchesterwerken durch das

www.ResMusica.com
www.ResMusica.com | 20 juin 2011 | Pierre-Jean Tribot | June 20, 2011 Fricsay dirige Bartók, un monument d’Histoire

L’excellent label berlinois Audite réputé pour le grand soin apportéMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
L’excellent label berlinois Audite réputé pour le grand soin apporté

Schwäbische Zeitung
Schwäbische Zeitung | Freitag, 10. Juni 2011 | man | June 10, 2011 The Hungarian Connection

Das Label Audite veröffentlicht die interessanten und impulsivenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Label Audite veröffentlicht die interessanten und impulsiven

Der Reinbeker
Der Reinbeker | Jg. 47, Nr. 11 (6. Juni 2011) | Peter Steder | June 6, 2011 Von Klassik bis Jazz und Rock

Ein Knüller: Erstveröffentlichung aller erhaltenen Bartok-EinspielungenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ein Knüller: Erstveröffentlichung aller erhaltenen Bartok-Einspielungen

www.schallplattenkritik.de | 2/2011 | Prof. Dr. Lothar Prox | May 15, 2011

Urkunde siehe PDFMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Urkunde siehe PDF

www.schallplattenkritik.de | 2-2011 | Christoph Zimmermann | May 15, 2011 Historische Aufnahmen Klassik

Schatzgrube RIAS: Fricsays hochemotionales, energisches Dirigat läßtMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Schatzgrube RIAS: Fricsays hochemotionales, energisches Dirigat läßt

www.klavier.de | 08.05.2011 | Tobias Pfleger | May 8, 2011 Scharfe Rhythmen
Bartok, Bela: Violinkonzert Nr.2

Ferenc Fricsays Einsatz für die Musik Béla Bartóks wird von Audite mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ferenc Fricsays Einsatz für die Musik Béla Bartóks wird von Audite mit

klassik.com | 08.05.2011 | Tobias Pfleger | May 8, 2011 | source: http://magazin.k... Scharfe Rhythmen

Das Label Audite hat sich in der Vergangenheit mit der VeröffentlichungMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Label Audite hat sich in der Vergangenheit mit der Veröffentlichung

Diapason
Diapason | N° 591 Mai 2011 | Patrick Szersnovicz | May 1, 2011 Bela Bartok

«Dans une partition, je m'attaque d'abord au passage le plus faible et c'est à partir de là que je donne forme à l'ensemble», disait FerencMehr lesen

«Dans une partition, je m'attaque d'abord au passage le plus faible et c'est à partir de là que je donne forme à l'ensemble», disait Ferenc Fricsay (1914-1963), dont la qualité première était J'évidence. Le coffret Audite reprend des enregistrements réalisés dans les conditions du studio à la Jesus Christus Kirche de Berlin par la RIAS entre 1950 et 1953, inédits au disque à l'exception des Deux portraits, de la Suite de danses et de la Cantata profana, déjà parus chez DG. Dans cette fresque sublime, l'intime fusion de l'orchestre et du double chœur (ici en allemand) a rarement sonné de façon aussi expressive. A la voix brillante de Krebs répond la supplication de Fischer-Dieskau, rude et subtile.

Tout aussi électrisante, et bénéficiant d'une étonnante clarté des attaques, est la Musique pour cordes, percussion et célesta captée le 14 octobre 1952, au minutage plus généreux que la version de juin 1953 (DG). Inspiré de bout en bout, Fricsay souligne chaque incise tout en privilégiant la continuité, l'ampleur de respiration, l'airain des rythmes et un éclairage polyphonique d'une extrême sensibilité. Vertus précieuses dans la Suite de danses captée le 10 juin 1953 comme dans le Divertimento pour cordes (live du 11 février 1952).

Un rien distant, Fricsay souligne moins les inflexions «hungarisantes» du Concerto pour violon n° 2 (avec Tibor Varga, 1951) que lors de l'enregistrement avec les Berliner Philharmoniker (DG, 1951), tandis que les qualités poétiques et analytiques de la version «officielle» du Concerto pour piano n° 2 avec Geza Anda (DG ou Philips, 1959) ne sont pas tout à fait égalées. Andor Foldes dans la Rhapsodie pour piano et orchestre (studio, 12 décembre 1951) et plus encore Louis Kentner dans le Concerto n° 3 (live, 16 janvier 1950) semblent en revanche aller plus loin dans la simplicité lumineuse. Inégal, donc. Mais à ce niveau, et avec une telle qualité sonore: indispensable!
«Dans une partition, je m'attaque d'abord au passage le plus faible et c'est à partir de là que je donne forme à l'ensemble», disait Ferenc

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | Mai 2011 | Thomas Schulz | May 1, 2011 Authentisch

Man darf wohl ohne Übertreibung feststellen, dass kein Dirigent unmittelbar nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg so viel für die Akzeptanz der Musik BélaMehr lesen

Man darf wohl ohne Übertreibung feststellen, dass kein Dirigent unmittelbar nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg so viel für die Akzeptanz der Musik Béla Bartóks in Deutschland beigetragen hat wie Ferenc Fricsay. Seine Interpretationen einiger der wichtigsten Orchesterwerke bei der Deutschen Grammophon sind zu Recht legendär. Nun gibt es unverhofft reichhaltigen Nachschub: sämtliche noch erhaltenen Aufnahmen, die Fricsay in den Jahren 1950 bis 1953 von Bartóks Werken für den RIAS einspielte.

Was zuallererst überrascht, ist die hervorragende Klangqualität. Den CDs liegen die originalen Rundfunkbänder zugrunde, und durch das Remastering wurde eine Transparenz erreicht, die vorbildlich genannt werden kann; eine Ausnahme bildet lediglich der Live-Mitschnitt des dritten Klavierkonzerts. Weniger überraschen dürfte das durchweg hervorragende interpretatorische Niveau; Fricsay, der noch bei Bartók studierte, beherrscht naturgemäß das spezifisch ungarische Element dieser Musik, ihr gleichsam der Sprachmelodie abgelauschtes Rubato. Auch weigert er sich, Bartóks Musik im Tonfall eines permanenten "barbaro" ihrer zahlreichen Facetten zu berauben.

Adäquat unterstützt wird er dabei von den Solisten: Andor Foldes in der Rhapsodie op. 1, Géza Anda im zweiten und Louis Kentner im dritten Klavierkonzert sowie Tibor Varga im Violinkonzert Nr. 2. Die "Cantata profana" erklingt in einer deutschen Übersetzung, doch Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau und dem Tenor Helmut Krebs gelingt es, Inhalt und Grundaussage des viel zu selten aufgeführten Werks überzeugend zu transportieren.
Man darf wohl ohne Übertreibung feststellen, dass kein Dirigent unmittelbar nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg so viel für die Akzeptanz der Musik Béla

Stereo
Stereo | 5/2011 Mai | Thomas Schulz | May 1, 2011 Béla Bartók
Orchesterwerke und Konzerte

Kein Dirigent unmittelbar nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg hat wohl so viel fürMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Kein Dirigent unmittelbar nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg hat wohl so viel für

auditorium
auditorium | May 2011 | May 1, 2011

koreanische Rezension siehe PDF!Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
koreanische Rezension siehe PDF!

Classica
Classica | n° 132 mai 2011 | Stéphane Friédérich | May 1, 2011 Quand Fricsay dirige Bartók
LE LABEL ALLEMAND AUDITE ÉDITE UNE ANTHOLOGIE BARTÓK DU LEGS DE FRICSAY AVEC LE RIAS DE BERLIN. IDIOMATIQUE ET MAGNIFIQUE!

Le label Audite a réuni dans ce coffret de 3 CD une anthologie Bartók (etMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Le label Audite a réuni dans ce coffret de 3 CD une anthologie Bartók (et

Gramophone
Gramophone | May 2011 | Rob Cowan | May 1, 2011 Rob Cowan's monthly survey of reissues and archive recordings
Musical evangelists – A trio of releases that re-energise familiar repertoire

Audite continues its valuable series of radio broadcasts of that most gifted of regenerative post-war conductors, Ferenc Fricsay, with a three-disc,Mehr lesen

Audite continues its valuable series of radio broadcasts of that most gifted of regenerative post-war conductors, Ferenc Fricsay, with a three-disc, slim-pack collection of 1950-53 Bartók recordings featuring the RIAS Symphony Orchestra. Fricsay's DG Bartók legacy has, for many collectors, long been considered a benchmark, especially the set of piano concertos featuring Fricsay's musical soulmate Géza Anda. As it happens, Anda arrives in this present context with a 1953 studio version of the Second Concerto where, even at this relatively early stage, the watertight rapport between pianist and conductor makes for an enormously exciting performance, wilder than the stereo commercial recording, marginally less incisive ensemble-wise but with a performance of the finale that must rank among the most thrilling ever recorded. There are various Anda versions of the Second around but this is surely the one that best showcases his mastery of what is, after all, a pretty demanding score. The 20-minute Rhapsody is entrusted to a more "classical", and at times more restrained, Andor Foldes, whose generous DG collection of Bartók's solo piano works is long overdue for reissue.

Louis Kentner gave the Third Concerto's European premiere and his big-boned version of the Third calls for plenty of Lisztian thunder, especially in the outer movements, whereas the central Adagio religioso recalls the free-flowing style of Bartók's own piano-playing. Fricsay's commercial record of the Second Violin Concerto with Tibor Varga was always highly regarded, even though not everyone takes to Varga's fast and rather unvarying vibrato. Although undeniably exciting, this 1951 live performance falls prey to some ragged tuttis while Varga himself bows one or two conspicuously rough phrases. To be honest, I much preferred the warmer, less nervy playing of violinist Rudolf Schulz in the first of the Two Portraits, while the wild waltz-time Second Portrait (a bitter distortion of the First's dewy-eyed love theme) is taken at just the right tempo. Fricsay's 1952 live version of the Divertimento for strings passes on the expected fierce attack in favour of something more expressively legato (certainly in the opening Allegro non troppo) and parts of the Dance Suite positively ooze sensuality, especially for the opening of the finale, which sounds like some evil, stealthy predator creeping towards its prey at dead of night. Fricsay's versions of the Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta and Cantata profana (with Helmut Krebs and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, sung in German) combine an appreciation of Bartók's mystical side with a keenly focused approach to the faster music's syncopated rhythms. Both works were recorded by Fricsay commercially but the extra adrenalin rush – and, in the case of Strings, Percussion and Celesta, extra breadth of utterance – in these radio versions provides their own justification. Good mono sound throughout and excellent notes by Wolfgang Rathert.

I was very pleased to see that Pristine Classical has reissued Albert Sammons's vital and musically persuasive 1926 account of Beethoven's Kreutzer Sonata, a performance that pre-dates the great Huberman-Friedman version and that, in some key respects, is almost its equal. Regarding Sammon's pianist, the Australian William Murdoch, the critic William James Turner wrote (in 1916), "even when we get to the best pianists it is rarely, if ever, that we find a combination of exceptional technical mastery with tone-power, delicacy of touch, brilliance, command of colour, sensitiveness of phrasing, variety of feeling, imagination and vital passion. Mr Murdoch possesses all these qualities to a high degree."

Pristine's coupling is a real curio and, at first glance, something of a find – Sammons in 1937 playing Fauré's First Sonata, a work which, so far as I know, is not otherwise represented in his discography and that suits his refined brand of emotionalism. But, alas, there is a significant drawback in the piano-playing of Edie Miller, which is ham-fisted to a fault and in one or two places technically well below par, not exactly what you want for the fragile world of Fauré's pianowriting. But if you can blank out the pianist from your listening, it's worth trying for Sammons's wonderful contribution alone. Otherwise, stick to the Beethoven.

A quite different style of Beethoven interpretation arrives via Andromeda in the form of a complete symphony cycle given live in Vienna in 1960 by the Philharmonia Orchestra under Otto Klemperer with, in the Choral Symphony, the Wiener Singverein and soloists Wilma Lipp, Ursula Boese, Fritz Wunderlich and Franz Crass (who delivers a sonorous, warmly felt bass recitative). Inevitable comparisons with Klemperer's roughly contemporaneous EMI cycle reveal some quicker tempi live (ie, in the Eroica's Marcia funebre), an occasionally sweeter turn of phrase among the strings (the opening of the Pastoral's second movement) and a more forthright presence overall, although beware some ragged ensemble and a mono balance that turns Klemperer's normally helpful decision to divide his violin desks into a bit of a liability, meaning that the Seconds are more distant than the Firsts.

Turn to the commercial recordings and stereo balancing maximises on Klemperer's clarity-conscious orchestral layout and the balance is superb, although common to both is the fairly forward placing of the woodwinds. Still, an interesting set, one to place beside Andromeda's recently released Beethoven cycle, the one shared between London (Royal Philharmonic) and Vienna (State Opera Orchestra) under the volatile baton of Hermann Scherchen (Andromeda ANDRCD9078, on five CDs and published last year). If Klemperer invariably fulfilled one's expectations, Scherchen usually confounded them.
Audite continues its valuable series of radio broadcasts of that most gifted of regenerative post-war conductors, Ferenc Fricsay, with a three-disc,

Ostthüringer Zeitung
Ostthüringer Zeitung | Samstag, 23. April 2011 | Dr. sc. Eberhard Kneipel | April 23, 2011 Neu auf CD:
Maßstabsetzende Aufführungen

Beim Hören dieser drei CDs empfindet man viel Freude und Bewunderung. DennMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Beim Hören dieser drei CDs empfindet man viel Freude und Bewunderung. Denn

Die Rheinpfalz
Die Rheinpfalz | Nr.90 (Samstag, 16. April 2011) | pom | April 16, 2011 Bartok: Orchester-Werke mit Ferenc Fricsay

Bartoks Musik ist ebenso universal, geschrieben von einem Kosmopoliten, wieMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Bartoks Musik ist ebenso universal, geschrieben von einem Kosmopoliten, wie

Record Geijutsu
Record Geijutsu | APR. 2011 | April 1, 2011 Bartók

japanische Rezension siehe PDFMehr lesen

japanische Rezension siehe PDF
japanische Rezension siehe PDF

thewholenote.com | April 2011 | Bruce Surtees | April 1, 2011 Old Wine In New Bottles – Fine Old Recordings

The deservedly honoured Hungarian conductor Ferenc Fricsay (1914-1973) ledMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The deservedly honoured Hungarian conductor Ferenc Fricsay (1914-1973) led

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | N° 212 - 4/2011 | Rémy Franck | April 1, 2011 Fricsays Bartók

Bela Bartóks Musik ist eng mit der Volksmusik seiner Heimat verbunden, eine Konstante in einem Schaffen, das sich stilistisch im Laufe der JahreMehr lesen

Bela Bartóks Musik ist eng mit der Volksmusik seiner Heimat verbunden, eine Konstante in einem Schaffen, das sich stilistisch im Laufe der Jahre durchaus wandelte und doch immer so charakteristisch blieb, dass die Musik stets identifizierbar ist. Neben perkussiver Motorik und einem eher scharfen Orchesterklang kennzeichnet ein immer wieder berückender Lyrismus die Musik.

Die vorliegende Zusammenstellung aus den Jahren 1950-53 umfasst alle im RIAS-Archiv erhaltenen Bartók-Einspielungen Fricsays. Sie runden ein Bild ab, das man von Fricsays DG-Aufnahmen aus dieser Zeit hatte.

Fricsay hat Bartók nie weichgekocht, er serviert ihn uns in intensiv aufbereitetem rohen Zustand, mit viel Impetus und einer aufregenden Mischung aus Zynismus, Ironie, Resignation und leidenschaftlicher Beseeltheit. Ein Leckerbissen ist gleich das 2. Violinkonzert mit Tibor Varga. Das schnelle Vibrato des Geigers mag heute ungewohnt klingen, aber der schmachtend lyrische langsame Satz und die virtuosen Ecksätze sind doch sehr interessant. Die beiden 'Portraits', das erste packend emotional, das zweite fulminant virtuos, sind weitere Höhepunkte, genau wie die aufregende Interpretation der Musik für Saiteninstrumente, Schlagzeug und Celesta, mit einem sehr trotzigen 2. Satz, der auf eine düstere Einleitung folgt, und einem notturnohaften, mysteriösen 3. Satz mit Nightmare-Charakter.

Die wenig aufgeführte Cantata profana (Untertitel: Die Zauberhirsche) ist ein Vokalwerk für Tenor, Bariton, Chor und Orchester aus dem Jahre 1930. Ein rumänisches Volkslied mit der Geschichte eines Vaters und seiner neun Söhne, die auf die Jagd gehen, einen Hirsch zu schießen und dabei selbst in Hirsche verwandelt werden, bildet die Vorlage für das Werk. Sie wird hier in einer packenden Interpretation vorgelegt.

Sehr konzentrierte Einspielungen gibt es vom Klavierkonzert Nr. 2 mit Geza Anda sowie von der Klavierrhapsodie mit Andor Foldes.
Bela Bartóks Musik ist eng mit der Volksmusik seiner Heimat verbunden, eine Konstante in einem Schaffen, das sich stilistisch im Laufe der Jahre

Audiophile Audition
Audiophile Audition | March 29, 2011 | Gary Lemco | March 29, 2011 A splendid assemblage of conductor Ferenc Fricsay’s homage to Bartok, a project to inscribe an integral Bartok legacy but frustrated by the conductor’s untimely demise

The powerful affinity between Hungarian conductor Ferenc FricsayMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The powerful affinity between Hungarian conductor Ferenc Fricsay

Die Zeit
Die Zeit | N° 12 (17. März 2011) | Wolfram Goertz | March 17, 2011 Der Durchleuchter
So enthusiastisch dirigierte Ferenc Fricsay Musik von Béla Bartók

Er war in Wien angekommen und trotzdem unglücklich. Er dirigierte an derMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Er war in Wien angekommen und trotzdem unglücklich. Er dirigierte an der

Classical Recordings Quarterly | Spring 2011 | Norbert Hornig | March 1, 2011 continental report

The Audite label is very busy in releasing new remastered tapes from German broadcast companies, and has enlarged its discography of the greatMehr lesen

The Audite label is very busy in releasing new remastered tapes from German broadcast companies, and has enlarged its discography of the great Hungarian conductor Ferenc Fricsay. "Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartók" is the title of a three CD-set which comprises his complete early Bartók recordings for RIAS Berlin, taped at the Jesus-Christus-Kirche and live at the Titania-Palast between 1950-53. Fricsay was one of the most impressive conductors of Bartók's music, and his DG recordings of it are famous. These RIAS recordings complete the picture of Fricsay as a Bartók interpreter. The edition comprises the Violin Concerto No. 2, Deux Portraits, Op. 5, Cantata profana (with the young Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau), Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, Dance Suite, Divertimento for Strings, Rhapsody for Piano and Orchestra and the Piano Concertos No. 2 and No. 3. The soloists are mainly artists from Hungary: violinist Tibor Varga, the pianists Andor Foldes, Geza Anda and Louis Kentner (CD 21.407). [A full review of this issue will appear in the Summer issue. Ed.]

Another release from Audite is very special: a live recording of Stravinsky's rarely performed Persephone (a melodrama in three parts for reciter, vocal soloist, double chorus and orchestra). Stravinsky composed Perséphone in 1933-34. The performance on Audite took place in 1960 at the Frankfurt Funkhaus, and the tape is from the archives of the Hessischer Rundfunk (Hessian Radio). Dean Dixon conducts the Symphony Orchestra of the Hessischer Rundfunk and, quite sensationally, Fritz Wunderlich sings the tenor role, for only one time in his life. So this live recording is a collector's item for all Wunderlich fans. The actress Doris Schade was perfectly cast as Perséphone (CD 95.619).
The Audite label is very busy in releasing new remastered tapes from German broadcast companies, and has enlarged its discography of the great

Rheinische Post
Rheinische Post | Freitag, 25. Februar 2011 | Wolfram Goertz | February 25, 2011 Ferenc Fricsay dirigiert Musik von Bela Bartók

Wenn es über eine Platte heißt, sie sei eine "editorisch sehr mutige Leitung", dann wird man bisweilen mit einem Langweiler konfrontiert, der auchMehr lesen

Wenn es über eine Platte heißt, sie sei eine "editorisch sehr mutige Leitung", dann wird man bisweilen mit einem Langweiler konfrontiert, der auch noch das Zeug zum Ladenhüter hat. Diese 3-CD-Box ist verlegerisch wichtig und bietet trotzdem mitreißendes Musizieren.

Ferenc Fricsay war einer der großen Dirigenten des 20. Jahrhunderts, vom Publikum verehrt, von den Musikern geliebt und gefürchtet. Fricsay empfand sich als Durchleuchter, er äderte Musiker hell und klar, statt Linien feucht zu bepinseln. Seinem Landsmann Bela Bartók war er besonders verbunden, und dessen Musik nahm auch eine wichtige Stellung in den Aufnahmen ein, die Fricsay in den frühen Fünfzigern mit dem Rias-Orchester machte. Er waren Einspielungen fürs Archiv des jungen Senders, aber Fricsay geizte mit Temperament nie.

Die Box bietet Klavier- und Violinkonzerte (mit Geza Anda, Andor Foldes und Tibor Varga), die Musik für Saiteninstrumente, Schlagzeug und Celesta, die oft unterschätzte Cantata profana (mit Helmut Krebs und Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau) und das hinreißende Divertimento für Streichorchester. Über allem schwebt und feuert unverkennbar Fricsays Enthusiasmus.
Wenn es über eine Platte heißt, sie sei eine "editorisch sehr mutige Leitung", dann wird man bisweilen mit einem Langweiler konfrontiert, der auch

Südwest Presse | Donnerstag, 24. Februar 2011 | Jürgen Kanold | February 24, 2011 Bevorzugt spätromantisch
Ungarn unter sich

Ungarischer Dirigent führt mit ungarischen Solisten das Werk desMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ungarischer Dirigent führt mit ungarischen Solisten das Werk des

Schwäbisches Tagblatt | 24.02.2011 | SWP | February 24, 2011 Bevorzugt spätromantisch
Aufnahmen mit Diana Damrau und Hilary Hahn

Ungarischer Dirigent führt mit ungarischen Solisten das Werk desMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ungarischer Dirigent führt mit ungarischen Solisten das Werk des

Der neue Merker
Der neue Merker | Donnerstag, 24.02.2011 | February 24, 2011 Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartok – The early RIAS recordings

Das Projekt einer repräsentativen, vielleicht sogar auf VollständigkeitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Projekt einer repräsentativen, vielleicht sogar auf Vollständigkeit

deropernfreund.de | 37. Jahrgang, 19. Februar 2011 | Egon Bezold | February 19, 2011 Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartok – The early RIAS recordings
Die kompletten Einspielungen von RIAS Berlin

Eine lange schwere Krankheit setzt seiner dirigentischen Karriere im AlterMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Eine lange schwere Krankheit setzt seiner dirigentischen Karriere im Alter

Visionae - Das Portal für Kunst und Kultur | 18. Februar 2011 | mb | February 18, 2011 Ferenc Fricsay dirigiert Bela Bartok

Fricsay trat bereits mit sechs Jahren in die Budapester MusikhochschuleMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Fricsay trat bereits mit sechs Jahren in die Budapester Musikhochschule

Universitas
Universitas | Nr. 2/2011 | Adelbert Reif | February 1, 2011 Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartók

"Dass man heute Musik machen kann ohne Negation, ohne Programm oderMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
"Dass man heute Musik machen kann ohne Negation, ohne Programm oder

Diverdi Magazin
Diverdi Magazin | ano XX n° 200 (febrero 2011) | Stefano Russomanno | February 1, 2011 Olimpo bartokiano
Audite edita en un estuche de tres cds las grabaciones para la Radio de Berlín que realizó en los cincuenta Ferenc Fricsay con música del gran autor húngaro

El Bartók de Fricsay pertenece a esta serie de emparejamientos legendarios en los que la estrecha afinidad entre compositor e intérprete trasciendeMehr lesen

El Bartók de Fricsay pertenece a esta serie de emparejamientos legendarios en los que la estrecha afinidad entre compositor e intérprete trasciende lo musical y alcanza un grado de comunión espiritual: Furtwängler / Beethoven, Knappertsbusch / Wagner, Toscanini / Verdi, Karajan / Strauss ... Las grabaciones bartókianas que Fricsay realizó para Deutsche Grammophon en la década de los cincuenta no han dejado nunca de representar una referencia absoluta. Puede que otros directores las hayan igualado en ocasiones puntuales, pero nunca las han superado. En su conjunto, representan un hito discográfico de obligado conocimiento, donde la fidelidad del concepto (Fricsay había estudiado en su juventud con Bartók) se alía a unas cualidades musicales y técnicas de primer nivel: intensidad, vigor rítmico, flexibilidad, transparencia, fluidez ... ¿se puede pedir más?

Fricsay no fue sólo un extraordinario director, sino también un formidable constructor de orquestas. En 1948 se le encomendó la dirección de la recién creada Orquesta Sinfónica de la RIAS (la radio que los aliados habían creado en Berlín oeste), un conjunto que moldeó a su imagen y semejanza y que convirtió en pocos años en una de las mejores agrupaciones sinfónicas europeas. La filosofía sonora de la orquesta radicaba en la precisión y la nitidez de una sección de cuerdas contundente pero ligera (lejos de la densidad y suntuosidad propias de los conjuntos alemanes) junto a unos vientos dotados de un insólito relieve, penetrantes y muy dúctiles. Unas cualidades especialmente aptas para la música bartókiana.

Junto a sus célebres versiones de Bartók en Deutsche Grammophon, Fricsay realizó una serie de grabaciones para la radio berlinesa que Audite acaba ahora de reunir en tres discos. Se trata de registros comprendidos en un período entre 1950 y 1953, que preceden – a veces en cuestión de meses – las tomas del sello amarillo. En lo que respecta a la Música para cuerdas, percusión y celesta, la Suite de danzas, el Divertimento y los Dos retratos, la proximidad cronológica entre las dos versiones y la presencia de la misma orquesta hacen que las diferencias interpretativas sean de escasa consideración. En el caso de la Cantata profana, se trata del mismo registro que DG editó por primera vez en los noventa dentro de su serie Dokumente. Tres años median entre la grabación radiofónica y discográfica del Concierto para violín n° 2. Orquesta y solista (Tibor Varga) son los mismos, pero la primera es una versión en vivo: de ello se desprende un grado de tensión algo mayor (Varga es superlativo en la cadencia del Allegro non troppo) y una calidad de sonido inevitablemente inferior.

Además de los títulos citados, la caja de Audite se completa con la Rapsodia para piano y orquesta op. l y los Conciertos para piano n° 2 y 3 (desgraciadamente, resulta irrecuperable una cinta del Castillo de Barba Azul grabada en 1958 y destruida en los años sesenta). Fricsay grabaría la integral de la música para piano y orquesta de Bartók junto a Geza Anda entre 1959 y 1960, ya con sonido estéreo: todo un pilar de la discografía del compositor húngaro. La comparación es aquí especialmente interesante no sólo por la distancia cronológica entre las respectivas versiones (entre siete y diez años), sino porque en dos casos el solista es diferente. La Rapsodia cuenta con la participación de otro bartókiano ilustre, Andor Foldes, en una versión que acerca la obra al perfil modernista e iconoclasta del Concierto para piano n° I, mientras que la sucesiva versión de Anda prefiere subrayar las raíces lisztianas. Protagonista del Concierto n° 3 es Louis Kentner, quien intenta "masculinizar" la pieza con un talante a veces excesivamente agresivo. Más equilibrado y clasicista, el binomio Anda / Fricsay (y no olvidemos el dúo Fischer / Fricsay) es sin duda superior. Tampoco la calidad de la toma en vivo ayuda mucho, puesto que la orquesta queda relegada a un fastidioso segundo plano.

En el Concierto n° 2 el solista es Geza Anda, pero los siete años de distancia entre esta versión y la "oficial" de DG se notan. Esta última representa el legado de dos intérpretes que dominan la partitura con una soltura impresionante, que conocen todos sus recovecos y han conseguido elevarla al rango de "clásica". Puede que la presente versión de 1953 no tenga la perfección de aquella otra, pero comunica un mayor grado de exaltación y arrebato: las disonancias son más ásperas, los efectos percusivos más contundentes ... Ahí prevalece la templanza de la sabiduría, aquí el entusiasmo físico del descubrimiento y la exploración. Si tuviera que elegir, diría que la versión radiofónica gana por puntos a la oficial.

En los años cincuenta, la Radio de Berlín contaba con una tecnología punta en la grabación del sonido y sus técnicos contaban entre los más cualificados en esas labores. Si a ello añadimos la habitual excelencia de las remasterizaciones de Audite, será fácil imaginar que los registros poseen una increíble calidad para los estándares de la época. Las grabaciones en estudio no tienen nada que envidiar a las posteriores de Deutsche Grammophon, mientras que las tres realizadas en vivo son de un nivel inevitablemente inferior, si bien sólo en un caso (el Concierto para piano n° 3) el resultado es poco satisfactorio. Pero no se confundan: esta caja es una auténtica joya del primero al último minuto, una verdadera bendición para los amantes de Bartók y de la música en general. No cabe duda de que con este triple volumen la Fricsay Edition que promueve Audite ha alcanzado su culminación.
El Bartók de Fricsay pertenece a esta serie de emparejamientos legendarios en los que la estrecha afinidad entre compositor e intérprete trasciende

Edel: Kulturmagazin
Edel: Kulturmagazin | Vol. 2 (Januar / Februar 2011) | January 24, 2011 Ferenc Fricsay dirigiert Béla Bartók

Das Projekt einer repräsentativen Einspielung der Werke Bartóks begleitete Ferenc Fricsay von Beginn seiner Tätigkeit in Berlin. CharakteristischMehr lesen

Das Projekt einer repräsentativen Einspielung der Werke Bartóks begleitete Ferenc Fricsay von Beginn seiner Tätigkeit in Berlin. Charakteristisch für die vorliegenden RIAS-Einspielungen ist die Besetzung der Solistenpartien mit fast durchweg ungarischen Künstlern wie Géza Anda, Andor Foldes oder Tibor Varga. Einzige Ausnahme bildet hierbei der von Fricsay hoch geschätzte Fischer-Dieskau. Die vorliegende Zusammenstellung aus den Jahren 1951-53 umfasst alle im RIAS-Archiv erhaltenen Bartók-Einspielungen Fricsays. Der Bogen spannt sich vom Opus 1, der noch ganz im ungarischen National-Idiom stehenden Rhapsodie für Klavier und Orchester aus dem Jahr 1904 über die expressionistisch aufgewühlten Deux Portraits op. 5 von 1907/08 und die kraftvoll-optimistische Tanzsuite von 1921 bis zu den Meisterwerken der 1930er Jahre wie dem neo-barock angehauchten 2. Klavierkonzert (1930/31) oder der glanzvollen Musik für Saiteninstrumente, Schlagzeug und Celesta (1935). Die Intensität von Fricsays Deutung überträgt sich auch heute, mehr als 60 Jahre nach dem Entstehen dieser Aufnahmen, noch unmittelbar auf den Hörer – sowohl im Impetus und der lebensbejahenden Kraft der Rhythmik wie in den geheimnisvoll-resignativen und ironisch verzerrten Momenten dieser an Zwischentönen so reichen Musik.
Das Projekt einer repräsentativen Einspielung der Werke Bartóks begleitete Ferenc Fricsay von Beginn seiner Tätigkeit in Berlin. Charakteristisch

Rondo
Rondo | 03/2011 | Matthias Kornemann Kornemanns Klavierklassiker
»Alte« Klaviermeister auf neuen CDs. Matthias Kornemann stellt sie vor.

Könnte man den klavierhistorischen Frühling besser beginnen als mit demMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Könnte man den klavierhistorischen Frühling besser beginnen als mit dem

Merchant Infos

Ferenc Fricsay conducts Béla Bartok – The early RIAS recordings
article number: 21.407
EAN barcode: 4022143214072
price group: CV
release date: 18. February 2011
total time: 213 min.

More from Béla Bartók

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...