Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Isaac Stern plays Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto, Op. 35 and Bartók: Violin Concerto No. 2, Sz. 112

95624 - Isaac Stern plays Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto, Op. 35 and Bartók: Violin Concerto No. 2, Sz. 112

aud 95.624
Bitte Qualität wählen

Isaac Stern plays Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto, Op. 35 and Bartók: Violin Concerto No. 2, Sz. 112

Live recordings with Isaac Stern are rarities. The concert recordings made in the summers of 1956 and 1958 at LUCERNE FESTIVAL are thus all the more valuable. Stern presents the Violin Concertos by Bartók and Tchaikovsky, proving himself to be a full-blooded musician ready to take risks: the results are highly expressive and rousing interpretations.more

"Das Tschaikowsky-Konzert unter der Leitung des jungen Lorin Maazel [...] ist vielleicht die effektvollste Darstellung dieses Werks, die derzeit auf CD greifbar ist" (Die Presse)

Multimedia

Informationen

​​"To make the violin speak" - that was Isaac Stern's succinct artistic maxim. These live recordings of the Second Violin Concerto by Béla Bartók and the D major Concerto by Peter Tchaikovsky, made in 1956 and 1958 at the LUCERNE FESTIVAL, exemplify how Stern realised his concept of musical rhetoric on the concert platform. Stern never performed in Germany; in Switzerland, however, he gave concerts frequently. He was a regular guest at the LUCERNE FESTIVAL, appearing ten times between 1948 and 1988, both as soloist and as chamber musician, including with his Piano Trio alongside Eugene Istomin and Leonard Rose. Only a small number of live recordings with Isaac Stern exist. The Lucerne recordings of the Tchaikovsky and Bartók Concertos, issued here for the first time, are thus of particular documentary value, as well as important elements within the extensive discography of the violinist who died in 2001.

In cooperation with audite, LUCERNE FESTIVAL presents outstanding concert recordings of artists who have shaped the festival throughout its history. The aim of this CD edition is to rediscover treasures - most of which have not been released previously - from the first six decades of the festival, which was founded in 1938 with a special gala concert conducted by Arturo Toscanini. These recordings have been made available by the archives of SRF Swiss Radio and Television, which has broadcast the Lucerne concerts from the outset. Carefully re-mastered and supplemented with photos and materials from the LUCERNE FESTIVAL archive, they represent a sonic history of the festival.

This release is furnished with a "producer's comment" by producer Ludger Böckenhoff.

Reviews

Neue Zürcher Zeitung
Neue Zürcher Zeitung | 25.04.2014 | tsr | April 25, 2014 Isaac Stern, der Jahrhundertgeiger

Die vom Label Audite einem raffinierten Remastering unterzogene Aufnahme lässt [...] erahnen, was die Grösse dieses Jahrhundertgeigers ausmachte. Man weiss nicht, ob man die Wärme des Tons, die Freiheiten in der Gestaltung oder die unglaubliche Spannkraft seines Spiels mehr bewundern soll. Eine solche Interpretation, die der besten romantischen Tradition folgt, ist meilenweit von den heutigen Deutungen entfernt und dokumentiert damit nicht zuletzt den Wandel des Zeitgeschmacks. Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die vom Label Audite einem raffinierten Remastering unterzogene Aufnahme lässt [...] erahnen, was die Grösse dieses Jahrhundertgeigers ausmachte. Man weiss nicht, ob man die Wärme des Tons, die Freiheiten in der Gestaltung oder die unglaubliche Spannkraft seines Spiels mehr bewundern soll. Eine solche Interpretation, die der besten romantischen Tradition folgt, ist meilenweit von den heutigen Deutungen entfernt und dokumentiert damit nicht zuletzt den Wandel des Zeitgeschmacks.

American Record Guide | 19.03.2014 | David Radcliffe | March 19, 2014

Here is a mite to add to the already large Stern discography: broadcast recordings from the Lucerne festivals of 1956 and 1958. The violinist is inMehr lesen

Here is a mite to add to the already large Stern discography: broadcast recordings from the Lucerne festivals of 1956 and 1958. The violinist is in fine form, making it all sound easy which is a problem for people who believe that Tchaikovsky should sound passionate and Bartok edgy. Perhaps critics of a historicist bent should not write about such things; to us it sounds like Stern imitating Milstein imitating Heifetz. Imitation is by no means a bad thing, at least when one can discern a progress of tradition or refinement; but if there is development here it seems at best but a progress of blandness. To be sure, here is technical brilliance. But while Heifetz can still be thrilling in his arch coolness, Stern’s way with the music seems but an echo of an echo.
Here is a mite to add to the already large Stern discography: broadcast recordings from the Lucerne festivals of 1956 and 1958. The violinist is in

Fanfare | February 2014 | Jerry Dubins | February 12, 2014

This release is of particular interest to me, for as one who was born, raised, and lived most of my life in San Francisco, I probably saw and heardMehr lesen

This release is of particular interest to me, for as one who was born, raised, and lived most of my life in San Francisco, I probably saw and heard Isaac Stern perform live in concert and recital more times than any other single artist. That, of course, was because of Stern’s close ties to the city in which he grew up and studied violin under Louis Persinger, one-time teacher of Menuhin, and with Naoum Blinder, the San Francisco Symphony’s then concertmaster. In 1936, Stern made his debut with the orchestra under the baton of Pierre Monteux, and though he would soon leave San Francisco to pursue a career as one of the world’s most recognized and sought-after violin virtuosos, he returned often to the city that had nurtured him to appear with the orchestra and in recital with his long-time accompanist, Alexander Zakin.

In 1945, Stern signed a recording contract with Columbia, an association that lasted uninterrupted for 40 years, one of the longest such artist/record company alliances in history. And during those years, Stern joined forces with famous conductors, orchestras, and chamber musicians to record the entire mainstream violin concerto and chamber music repertoire, and beyond, often more than once. If you grew up in the 1950s and began collecting records in junior high and high school, as I did, the chances are you grew up with Isaac Stern spinning on your turntables. He was Columbia’s intended rival to RCA’s Heifetz, and I readily admit that I learned much of the violin literature from Stern’s recordings before I discovered those by other celebrated artists.

These versions of the Tchaikovsky and Bartók concertos – let it be stipulated that we are dealing with Bartók’s Violin Concerto No. 2, the more famous one, so it needn’t be repeated on each subsequent reference – are not only previously unreleased, they’re claimed to be quite rare, as Stern was seldom recorded live. A 1959 Brahms Concerto with Monteux and the Boston Symphony at Tanglewood was captured live and released by West Hill Radio Archives, which, I presume is still available since it was reviewed by Richard Kaplan as recently as 35:3. But that was the Brahms, not the Tchaikovsky or the Bartók and while Stern revisited the Tchaikovsky on a number of occasions with different conductors and orchestras, his track record with the Bartók, as far as I know, is limited to his one and only other version, a commercial studio recording he made two years after this one, in 1958, with Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. That, of course, makes this Audite release all the more valuable.

Of the Tchaikovsky – not counting this live performance – there are four others I’m aware of: (1) a 1949 recording with Alexander Hilsberg and the Philadelphia Orchestra; (2) a 1958 recording with the same orchestra under Eugene Ormandy, released in both mono (ML 5379) and stereo (MS 6062) and originally coupled with the Mendelssohn Concerto, but reissued a number of times in various sets and singles, including one coupled with the Sibelius Concerto; (3) a 1973 recording with Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic; and (4) the violinist’s last, a 1978 recording with Rostropovich and the National Symphony Orchestra.

Let me deal with the Bartók first, since there’s only one other Stern version to compare it to, the aforementioned studio recording with Bernstein. Before proceeding, however, I need to voice a disclaimer. I’ve had Stern’s Bartók with Bernstein on LP for longer than I can remember, but I haven’t dusted it off and listened to it in ages because, frankly, I never liked it. The reason goes back to my opening paragraph, where I reminisce about seeing and hearing Stern live on numerous occasions in San Francisco, though never in the Bartók.

It was around that same time, however, that another San Francisco-bred violinist, who also returned regularly to the city to […]
This release is of particular interest to me, for as one who was born, raised, and lived most of my life in San Francisco, I probably saw and heard

Rheinische Post
Rheinische Post | 11. Februar 2014 | Wolfram Goertz | February 11, 2014 Geiger Isaac Stern mit großen Violinkonzerten

Als der große US-amerikanische Dirigent Isaac Stern im Jahr 1981 in die Kinogeschichte einging, staunte die Welt nicht schlecht: Der DokumentarfilmMehr lesen

Als der große US-amerikanische Dirigent Isaac Stern im Jahr 1981 in die Kinogeschichte einging, staunte die Welt nicht schlecht: Der Dokumentarfilm "Von Mao zu Mozart" bot uns einen weltberühmten Geiger, der fern seines täglichen Abendlandes dem chinesischen Volk zeigte, was die Klassik für ein riesiger Brunnen ist. Es war vermutlich Stern, der damals die entscheidende asiatische Wende zu Mozart & Co. einleitete. An diese pädagogische Kompetenz fühlt man sich erinnert, da das Label audite historische Aufnahmen vom Lucerne Festival aus den Jahren 1956 und 1958 herausbringt – zuerst spielt Stern das Tschaikowski-, dann das zweite Bartók-Konzert.

Ihn begleiten Koryphäen: Lorin Maazel und Ernest Ansermet. Stern musiziert mit einer Überzeugungskraft, die erschlagend ist. Alles klingt höchst durchdacht, höchst durchglüht. Fürwahr: eine Lehrstunde.
Als der große US-amerikanische Dirigent Isaac Stern im Jahr 1981 in die Kinogeschichte einging, staunte die Welt nicht schlecht: Der Dokumentarfilm

thewholenote.com | 29 January 2014 | Bruce Surtees | January 29, 2014 Old Wine in New Bottles
Old Wine, New Bottles | Fine Old Recordings Re-Released – February 2014

These are performances to treasure.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
These are performances to treasure.

Gauchebdo | N° 1-3 | 18 Janvier 2014 | MTG | January 18, 2014 Audite fait revivre les moments inoubliables du Festival de Lucerne
MUSIQUE • La compagnie allemande sort trois concerts, dont un enregistrement de1969 de la 8ème de Dvorak par Georges Szell et la Philharmonie tchèque.

La sonorité du célèbre violoniste, ample, sans excès de vibrato, d'une incroyable justesse, sa virtuosité, plus encore son intelligence de l'oeuvre dans une parfaite entente avec Ansermet font de ce CD une unique dans la passe d'un lyrisme recueilli à une violènce rageuse, d'un chant sobre et calme à des appels tragiques, de rythmes tendus à des motifs dansants et l'on vit intensément la vérité de l'oeuvre.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
La sonorité du célèbre violoniste, ample, sans excès de vibrato, d'une incroyable justesse, sa virtuosité, plus encore son intelligence de l'oeuvre dans une parfaite entente avec Ansermet font de ce CD une unique dans la passe d'un lyrisme recueilli à une violènce rageuse, d'un chant sobre et calme à des appels tragiques, de rythmes tendus à des motifs dansants et l'on vit intensément la vérité de l'oeuvre.

Pulsion Audio | janvier 17, 2014 | Philippe Adelfang | January 17, 2014 Isaac Stern joue Tchaikovsky et Bartok

Bien que la qualité de l’enregistrement live de 1958 et 1956 n’est pas parfaite, la prise de son est assez généreuse pour traduire le violon magique de Stern. On peut écouter toute la dimension musicale et interprétative de ce grand artiste.<br /> L’accompagnement de M. Ansermet est tout à fait à son honneur, précis, très musical, absolument juste, bref une très belle expérience, une mémoire du son.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Bien que la qualité de l’enregistrement live de 1958 et 1956 n’est pas parfaite, la prise de son est assez généreuse pour traduire le violon magique de Stern. On peut écouter toute la dimension musicale et interprétative de ce grand artiste.
L’accompagnement de M. Ansermet est tout à fait à son honneur, précis, très musical, absolument juste, bref une très belle expérience, une mémoire du son.

The Strad
The Strad | January 2014 | Julian Haylock | January 1, 2014

Taped at the Lucerne Festival when Isaac Stern was at the height of hisMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Taped at the Lucerne Festival when Isaac Stern was at the height of his

ensuite Kulturmagazin | Nr. 132 | Dezember 2013 | Francois Lilienfeld | December 1, 2013 Als es noch IMF hieß…

Was da an explosiver Energie, an Schwung und Enthusiasmus geboten wird, ist geradezu unglaublich und wäre im Studio nur schwerlich möglich gewesen. Dabei kommt jedoch das gesangliche Element nicht zu kurz, und Sterns Geigenklang läßt Tschaikowskis Meisterwerk in großer Schönheit aufblühen.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Was da an explosiver Energie, an Schwung und Enthusiasmus geboten wird, ist geradezu unglaublich und wäre im Studio nur schwerlich möglich gewesen. Dabei kommt jedoch das gesangliche Element nicht zu kurz, und Sterns Geigenklang läßt Tschaikowskis Meisterwerk in großer Schönheit aufblühen.

Revue Musicale | 66e année, N° 4 (Décembre 2013) | M. Tétaz-Gramegna | December 1, 2013 Une histoire sonore du Festival de Lucerne

La sonorité de Stern, ample, sans excès de vibrato, d'une incroyable justesse, sa virtuosité, plus encore son imelligence de l'oeuvre dans une parfaite entente avec Ansermet font de ce CD une pièce unique dans la discographie des deux artistes.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
La sonorité de Stern, ample, sans excès de vibrato, d'une incroyable justesse, sa virtuosité, plus encore son imelligence de l'oeuvre dans une parfaite entente avec Ansermet font de ce CD une pièce unique dans la discographie des deux artistes.

Scherzo
Scherzo | diciembre 2013 | Enrique Pérez Adrián | December 1, 2013 Históricos en Lucerna

siehe PDF!Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
siehe PDF!

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | November 2013 | Christoph Vratz | November 1, 2013 Wider die Mär vom Kriecher

Wer tief gräbt, wird fündig. Das beweisen neue Editionen mit den Dirigenten Sergiu Celibidache und Leonard Bernstein mit Aufnahmen aus den vierzigerMehr lesen

Wer tief gräbt, wird fündig. Das beweisen neue Editionen mit den Dirigenten Sergiu Celibidache und Leonard Bernstein mit Aufnahmen aus den vierziger Jahren sowie der Auftakt zu einer neuen Reihe mit Konzertmitschnitten vom Luzern-Festival.

Es begann am Abend des 23. August 1945, als Leo Borchard in Berlin auf offener Straße von einem amerikanischen Besatzungssoldaten erschossen wurde. Borchard war russischer Dirigent und während des Auftrittsverbots von Wilhelm Furtwängler Chef des Berliner Philharmonischen Orchesters. Nun schlug die Stunde des damals 33-jährigen und weitgehend unbekannten Sergiu Celibidache, frisch absolvierter Studiosus der Mathematik, Philosophie und Musik und kriegsbedingt nicht promovierter Josquin-Desprez-Forscher. Nach eigener Aussage "politisch eine Jungfrau", gelangte Celibidache ans Pult des Berliner Renommier-Orchesters, ausgestattet mit einer Lizenz für alle vier Besatzungszonen.

Sechs Tage nach Borchards Tod stand also der junge Rumäne, der bis dahin lediglich einigen Hochschul- und Laienorchestern vorgestanden hatte, vor seinem neuen Orchester und dirigierte Werke von Rossini, Weber, Dvorak. Mehr als 400 weitere Male hat Celibidache die Philharmoniker dirigiert und sie für Furtwänglers Comeback fit gehalten bzw. sie auf die ihm eigene Weise auf Zack gebracht. Als der schließlich entnazifizierte Chef wieder auf seinen alten Posten zurückkehren konnte, fand er ein topgeschultes Orchester vor.

Eine der speziellen Herausforderungen dieser Interimszeit bestand darin, Musiker und Publikum mit Komponisten bekannt zu machen oder vielmehr zu versöhnen, die während des Dritten Reichs als unerwünscht galten: Hindemith, Strawinsky, Bartok, Prokofjew oder Darius Milhaud. Das musikalische Berlin lag dem vitalen Schlacks, der sich mit virtuosem Temperament am Pult gebierte, schnell zu Füßen, da er die vom Krieg ausgemergelten Musiker, wild die Arme in die Luft werfend, neu antrieb und motivierte.

Nun war Celibidache sein Leben lang auch ein reger Widerspruchsgeist, nicht zuletzt in eigener Sache: Er liebte die orchestrale Perfektion, lehnte aber das Medium der Schallplatte ab, obwohl gerade dort jene Perfektion erwünscht war, die er so liebte. Nicht erwehren konnte er sich gegen eine Reihe von Live-Mitschnitten, die posthum dem Schallplatten- bzw. CD-Markt zugeführt wurden, darunter insbesondere die Dokumente seiner Münchner Zeit. Jetzt liegt eine zwölf CDs umfassende Edition mit Nachkriegsaufnahmen aus Celibidaches Berliner Zeit vor, mit Aufnahmen dreier Berliner Orchester: den Philharmonikern, dem Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester und dem Radio-Symphonieorchester des RIAS.

Man begegnet in dieser Box einigen Raritäten wie Cesar Cuis "In modo populari" oder Reinhold Glieres Konzert für Koloratursopran und Orchester, Rudi Stephans "Musik für Orchester" oder Walter Pistons zweiter Sinfonie. Hinzu kommen Werke, die man mit Celibidache, gemessen an seinen späteren Jahren, nicht unbedingt in Verbindung bringt, etwa ein Violinkonzert von Vivaldi oder eine Suite nach Purcells "King Arthur". Auf der anderen Seite stehen Werke, die den großen Eigenwilligen immer wieder begleitet haben, Felix Mendelssohns "Italienische", Richard Strauss' "Till Eulenspiegel" oder Werke von Tschaikowsky, Brahms und Beethoven.

Es ist sicher schwierig, aus diesem insgesamt heterogenen Repertoire und in der Zusammenarbeit mit drei Orchestern bereits eine unverwechselbare Handschrift erkennen zu können; dennoch gibt es Kennzeichen, die auf den furiosen, individualistischen und unbeugsamen Stil dieses Dirigenten schließen lassen. Werke wie Tschaikowskys Zweite oder Hector Berlioz' "Corsaire"-Ouvertüre zeigen bereits die ganze Spannbreite des großen Sensibilissimus und des sperrigen Draufgängers, der zwischen diesen Polen ständig eine Form von Wahrheit und Vollkomme suchte. Als exemplarisches Beispiel für diese Haltung darf das Finale aus Mendelssohns Vierter gelten: Hier dürften in den Proben die Fetzen geflogen sein, bis alles so saß, wie es nun, in der Aufnahme vom November 1953, sitzt, bis die Streicher wie ein Mann durch das kleine Fugato wirbelten und die Holzbläser mit delikatester Präzision ihren Saltarello tanzten.

Dagegen wirkt etwa der Mitschnitt von Chopins zweitem Klavierkonzert mit dem Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester und Raoul Koczalski als Solist ein wenig unbeholfen; das Maestoso im Kopfsatz gerät stellenweise zu rassig, das orchestrale Tutti im Allegro vivace beinahe draufgängerisch. In etlichen Mitschnitten zeigt sich, dass das Bild vom tempodehnenden Celibidache, vor allem in diesen frühen Einspielungen, eine Mär ist. Ob in Bizets C-Dur-Sinfonie, in Brahms' Vierter oder insbesondere in den beiden Ecksätzen von Prokofjews "Klassischer Sinfonie": Zwar ist Celibidache gewiss nicht auf der Suche nach neuen Geschwindigkeitsrekorden, doch wie er Dynamik und Spannkraft, rhythmische Präzision und das innere Tempo des Musizierens zueinander in Beziehung stellt, macht ihn nicht zum Beschwörer von Kriechformaten.

Am 29. und 30. November 1954 leitete Celibidache letztmalig die Philharmoniker, bevor am 30. November Wilhelm Furtwängler starb. Still und nicht wirklich heimlich rechnete er sich Chancen aus, dessen Posten übernehmen zu können. Doch die Mehrheit des Orchesters stand seinem Drill skeptisch gegenüber, einige flüsterten sogar hinter vorgehaltener Hand, er sei ein russischer Spion. Furtwänglers Nachfolger wurde Karajan, der einer kommerziellen und medialen Verbreitung von Konzerten und Schallplattenproduktionen weit offener gegenüberstand als der sich konsequent weigernde Celibidache.
[…]
Im Jahr seines 75. Geburtstages hat das Lucerne Festival mit einer eigenen CD-Reihe begonnen, die beim Label Audite erscheint. Otto Klemperer und Clara Haskil sind mit Mozarts d-MolI-Konzert KV 466 zu hören, eine Aufführung, die der Solistin als "unvergesslich" in Erinnerung geblieben ist. Robert Casadesus fand in Dimitri Mitropoulos einen kongenialen Partner für Beethovens fünftes Klavierkonzert – dies war zugleich der erste Auftritt der Wiener Philharmoniker in Luzern. George Szell ist mit zwei Werken vertreten, mit der achten Sinfonie von Dvorák (deren "Grazioso"-Charakter im dritten Satz hier auf beispielhafte Weise eingefangen wurde!) und der Ersten von Brahms, aufgezeichnet im August 1969 (mit der Tschechischen Philharmonie) bzw. 1962 (mit dem Schweizer Festival-Orchester). Isaac Stern spielt das Violinkonzert von Tschaikowsky und das zweite Konzert von Bartók, begleitet von Ernest Ansermet und Lorin Maazel. Nach diesem verheißungsvollen Beginn darf man der Fortsetzung dieser Serie mit großer Neugierde entgegensehen.
Wer tief gräbt, wird fündig. Das beweisen neue Editionen mit den Dirigenten Sergiu Celibidache und Leonard Bernstein mit Aufnahmen aus den vierziger

Musica | numero 251 - novembre 2013 | Riccardo Cassani | November 1, 2013

Per quanto riguarda la qualità audio è motivo di felicità scoprire che gli archivi della Radio Svizzera hanno conservato con cura e diligenza questo materiale. In particolare la registrazione ciaikovskiana del ’58 offre una qualità assolutamente paragonabile alle registrazioni commerciali coeve sia nella dinamica dinamica sia nella resa timbrica. L’equilibrio tra solista e orchestra (senza trucco e senza inganno) è in entrambi i casi assolutamente perfetto e solo una leggera saturazione rende appena meno godibile la registrazione bartókiana di due anni precedente.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Per quanto riguarda la qualità audio è motivo di felicità scoprire che gli archivi della Radio Svizzera hanno conservato con cura e diligenza questo materiale. In particolare la registrazione ciaikovskiana del ’58 offre una qualità assolutamente paragonabile alle registrazioni commerciali coeve sia nella dinamica dinamica sia nella resa timbrica. L’equilibrio tra solista e orchestra (senza trucco e senza inganno) è in entrambi i casi assolutamente perfetto e solo una leggera saturazione rende appena meno godibile la registrazione bartókiana di due anni precedente.

www.musicweb-international.com
www.musicweb-international.com | 13 oct 2013 | Stephen Greenbank | October 13, 2013

Isaac Stern was a violinist with more than one string to his bow – if you’ll excuse the pun. He was a multi-talented musician who forged a careerMehr lesen

Isaac Stern was a violinist with more than one string to his bow – if you’ll excuse the pun. He was a multi-talented musician who forged a career as a soloist, chamber musician and teacher, and excelled in all three. Never one to be confined by limiting boundaries, his talents over-spilled into other areas. He sponsored and mentored young violinists, including the likes of Perlman and Zukerman. In 1960, he spearheaded a campaign, together with the philanthropist Jacob Kaplan to save New York’s Carnegie Hall from demolition. Here he demonstrated his great organisational ability, highlighted by his shrewd networking and communication skills. As a friend of politicians and leaders, he was an inspiration behind the America-Israel Foundation which, to this day, provides scholarships for young musicians.

Born in the Ukraine in 1920, his family moved shortly after to the USA, where they settled in San Francisco. Of all his teachers, he credited Naoum Blinder as his most important influence. Whilst Stern specialised in the Classical and Romantic repertoire, he also had an interest in contemporary music, giving premieres of works by William Schuman, Peter Maxwell Davies and Penderecki. As a chamber musician, he established an enduring duo partnership with the pianist Alexander Zakin. He also formed a piano trio with Eugene Istomin (piano) and Leonard Rose (cello). They produced some very fine recordings of works by Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn and Brahms.

The Audite label has just celebrated its fortieth birthday and coinciding with this is releasing, in collaboration with the Swiss Festival authorities, a series of live broadcast recordings from the Lucerne Festival. The aim is to make available some of their vast archive, selecting performances of artistic merit by great concert artists. Most of these are seeing the light of day on CD for the first time. Many will be overjoyed to have these two Stern events, as live representations of the violinist are very sparse in his discography. Also, it is good to hear Stern at his zenith, when he was technically on top form. In later life, his instrumental facility became somewhat hampered by lack of practice due to his multitude of other interests.

He was a regular guest at the Lucerne Festival and appeared ten times between 1948 and 1988, both as soloist and as chamber musician. What we hear on this CD dates from the 1950s; the Bartók from 1956, conducted by Ansermet, and the Tchaikovsky from two years later with the young Maazel, who was making his Lucerne debut at this very concert.

Stern had a particular affinity for the Mendelssohn and Tchaikovsky concertos. Indeed the latter he recorded three times. For my money his 1958 studio recording with Ormandy and the Philadelphia is the most rewarding. The instance featured here is strongly argued and virile, at times gripping and highly charged. Stern is all passion and burnished intensity. The second movement is ravishingly played, with the melancholic and reflective qualities emphasised. In the third movement, he ratchets up the energy, with scintillating élan, rhythmic drive and technical brilliance. Maazel provides admirable support.

The Bartók second was a relative novelty in the 1950s. Composed in 1937-38, and dedicated to the Hungarian violinist Zoltán Székely, it was premiered in Amsterdam the following year with Székely and the Concertgebouw conducted by Mengelberg. Prior to this Stern concert, the Swiss Festival Orchestra had played the concerto with Menuhin in 1947. Again, the conductor was Ansermet. Their relative unfamiliarity with the score manifests itself in some intonation problems with the orchestra, and a premature entry of the harp at the beginning of the second movement. Apparently, Stern’s E string broke at the end of the first movement, but in no way did this throw him off course. This is extremely compelling and satisfying playing.

Stern’s robust and muscular tone is ideal for this concerto. His impulse-type vibrato allows him a range of tonal colour well-suited to a canvas such as this. Similarly, his bow arm enables a powerful sonority. Hwhat we hear is idiomatic, stylistically nuanced and technically secure. Like Menuhin, who has championed this concerto, with several recordings under his belt, Stern’s eloquent, expressive phrasing emphasises the rhapsodic nature of the work. All of these elements are more evident and to the fore than in his studio recording with Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic from 1958, which is in less than ideal sound and balance.

Considering that these performances originate from the mid-1950s, they are in remarkably good sound and form very welcome additions to the violinist’s discography. Norbert Hornig has provided some very enlightening and informative liner-notes. I eagerly await other treasures emanating from this source.
Isaac Stern was a violinist with more than one string to his bow – if you’ll excuse the pun. He was a multi-talented musician who forged a career

Badisches Tagblatt
Badisches Tagblatt | Mittwoch, 09. Oktober 2013 | Karl Nagel | October 9, 2013 Sternstunden der Musik aus Luzerner Festspielzeit

Was da an Feinheiten auch mit dem großen Harfensolo am Anfang zu hören ist, und wie Isaak Stern alle Feinheiten auf den Punkt bringt, ist bestechend. Die alte Aufnahme klingt wie eine gerade aufgenommene CD.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Was da an Feinheiten auch mit dem großen Harfensolo am Anfang zu hören ist, und wie Isaak Stern alle Feinheiten auf den Punkt bringt, ist bestechend. Die alte Aufnahme klingt wie eine gerade aufgenommene CD.

auditorium
auditorium | october 2013 | October 1, 2013 Isaac Stern plays Tchaikovsky and Bartók

koreanische Rezension siehe PDF!Mehr lesen

koreanische Rezension siehe PDF!
koreanische Rezension siehe PDF!

Classical Recordings Quarterly | Autumn 2013 | Norbert Hornig | October 1, 2013

Now 40 years old, the Audite label, based in Detmold in Germany, has built up a remarkable catalogue of classical recordings. Audiophile connoisseursMehr lesen

Now 40 years old, the Audite label, based in Detmold in Germany, has built up a remarkable catalogue of classical recordings. Audiophile connoisseurs can find many new recordings of the highest standards on Audite SACDs, as well as a steadily growing number of carefully remastered historical recordings, especially from German broadcasting archives – the former RIAS for example. It is important to stress that Audite has access to original tapes, and so the sound quality on its editions is better than on unlicensed versions of the same performances from second-generation sources available elsewhere.

On 23 June the label celebrated its birthday in Berlin. This was a convenient opportunity to introduce a new series of historical recordings from the Luzern Festival, which was founded in 1938. In cooperation with Audite the Swiss Festival authorities are now releasing outstanding concert recordings of great artists who have shaped its history and tradition. Most of the recordings are previously unreleased, and come from the archive of Swiss Radio and Television (SRF), which has regularly broadcast events from the Luzern Festival. The first three CDs are newly available, and they are real highlights. Clara Haskil is the soloist in Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20, KV 466, with Otto Klemperer conducting the Philharmonia Orchestra (1959). This wise, reflective reading is coupled with Beethoven’s Emperor Concerto, with Robert Casadesus and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra und Dimitri Mitropoulos, from 1957 (CD 95.623).

The second CD is dedicated to Isaac Stern. Live recordings with Stern are true rarities. At Luzern Festivals in 1956 and 1958 he played the Second Violin Concerto of Béla Bartók (1956) and the Tchaikovsky Concerto (1958). These are fiery and full-blooded interpretations. The Swiss Festival Orchestra is conducted respectively by Ernest Ansemet and Lorin Maazel, whose Festival debut this was (CD 95.624).

The third release is released in homage to George Szell, who conducts the Swiss Festival Orchestra in Brahms’s First Symphony (1962) and the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra in Dvorák’s Symphony No. 8, taped in 1969. There was always a special kind of chemistry between Czech performers and Dvorák. Every accent is in the right place, and the music comes directly from the heart. Nothing will go wrong here and when a conductor like Szell takes the baton something outstanding is likely to happen (CD 95.625).

A set of seven CDs from Audite is of special interest to chamber music enthusiasts and admirers of the Amadeus Quartet. From the beginning of its career this ensemble regularly came to the RIAS studios at Berlin, and over 20 years recorded a cross-section of its repertoire. Audite is releasing these documents in six volumes. The first is dedicated to Beethoven (CD 21.424). Between 1950 and 1967 the Amadeus Quartet recorded the whole cycle in Berlin, except Op. 74. The set is supplemented by the String Quintet, Op. 29, with viola player Cecil Aronowitz. Listeners have the opportunity here to follow the development and changes in the Amadeus style over a span of two decades. It is important to stress that all the movements were recorded in single unedited takes. It is interesting to have these Beethoven recordings as companions to the studio recordings made for DG by the Quartet between 1959 and 1963. […]
Now 40 years old, the Audite label, based in Detmold in Germany, has built up a remarkable catalogue of classical recordings. Audiophile connoisseurs

Classica – le meilleur de la musique classique & de la hi-fi
Classica – le meilleur de la musique classique & de la hi-fi | n° 156 octobre 2013 | Stéphane Friédérich | October 1, 2013

Voilà des témoignages qui délecteront les mélomanes. Deux d'entre euxMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Voilà des témoignages qui délecteront les mélomanes. Deux d'entre eux

Audiophile Audition
Audiophile Audition | September 25, 2013 | Gary Lemco | September 25, 2013

Stern milks the broad strokes of the Finale’s opening bars, and then he cuts loose with a scintillating rendition of the vivacissimo section, adding a spicy punch to the Russian dance supported by the French horn. Just when we assume the height of speed and audacity has reached the stratosphere, Stern and Maazel manage to find another level of aether to ascend. Quite a ride for Tchaikovsky, this performance!Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Stern milks the broad strokes of the Finale’s opening bars, and then he cuts loose with a scintillating rendition of the vivacissimo section, adding a spicy punch to the Russian dance supported by the French horn. Just when we assume the height of speed and audacity has reached the stratosphere, Stern and Maazel manage to find another level of aether to ascend. Quite a ride for Tchaikovsky, this performance!

Der Landbote | Montag, 16. September 2013 | Herbert Büttiker | September 16, 2013 Der Nachhall des Festvivals

Mit dem 27. Sinfoniekonzert ist das Lucerne Festival gestern zu EndeMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mit dem 27. Sinfoniekonzert ist das Lucerne Festival gestern zu Ende

Neue Luzerner Zeitung | Montag, 16. September 2013 / Nr. 213 | Fritz Schaub | September 16, 2013 Anfänge der Festival-Starparade

Nach Clara Haskil und Robert Casadesus sind jetzt auch Isaac Stern, LorinMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Nach Clara Haskil und Robert Casadesus sind jetzt auch Isaac Stern, Lorin

Scherzo
Scherzo | Año XXVIII - Nº 288 - Septiembre 2013 | September 1, 2013 Audite: 40 años de un buscador de tesoros

En junio de este año, la firma alemana Audite —sello del año en losMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
En junio de este año, la firma alemana Audite —sello del año en los

Musica | Numero 249 - settembre 2013 | September 1, 2013

[...] e ne emergono gioielli come questo CD, dedicato al grande Isaac Stern alle prese, fra il 1956 e il ’58, con due caposaldi come il Concerto di Ciaikovski e il Secondo di Bartók.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
[...] e ne emergono gioielli come questo CD, dedicato al grande Isaac Stern alle prese, fra il 1956 e il ’58, con due caposaldi come il Concerto di Ciaikovski e il Secondo di Bartók.

www.pizzicato.lu | 19/08/2013 | Remy Franck | August 19, 2013 Isaac Stern live in Luzern

Zwei ganz spontane, charakteristische und persönliche Interpretationen mit Isaac Stern (1920-2001) sind auf dieser CD zu hören, der zweiten in derMehr lesen

Zwei ganz spontane, charakteristische und persönliche Interpretationen mit Isaac Stern (1920-2001) sind auf dieser CD zu hören, der zweiten in der neuen Reihe der historischen Aufnahmen vom ‘Lucerne Festival’.

Der 28-jährige Lorin Maazel dirigiert zunächst Tchaikovskys Violinkonzert, in dem Stern mit unglaublich langen Legato-Phrasen fasziniert. Er verausgabt sich dabei so sehr, dass er bei den ersten Staccati nach einer so langen Legatorede eines etwas abwürgt: Zeichen von Menschlichkeit, genau wie einige andere Ungenauigkeiten im Zusammenspiel mit dem Orchester. Gegen Ende des Satzes reißt Stern eine Saite. Er spielt die restliche halbe Minute weiter, zwangsläufig unter Auslassung vieler Töne.

Auch mit Akzenten und kleinen Verzierungen erheischt der Geiger ständig Aufmerksamkeit. So wird beispielweise die Canzonetta belebt.

Der dritte Satz ist maximal tänzerisch und folkloristisch angelegt, aber auch hochvirtuos und fulminant. Stern gleicht einem Flugzeug, das bei genügender Geschwindigkeit vom Boden abhebt. Erstaunlich, dass dieser Flug durchs Finale beim Luzerner Publikum kaum Begeisterung auslöste.

In höchstem Maße intensiv und expressiv erklingt Béla Bartoks 2. Violinkonzert unter Ernest Ansermet. Was da im Orchester alles passiert, wie es da brodelt und ächzt (vor allem in den beiden Ecksätzen) ist stupend. Es ist nicht auszudenken, welche Wirkung diese Aufnahme hätte, wenn sie technisch besser wäre als das, was der Schweizer Rundfunk damals bewerkstelligte. Vor allem die schlechte Balance zwischen den bevorzugten Streichern und den benachteiligten Bläsern fällt hier ins Gewicht. Die Restaurierung durch Ludger Böckenhoff ist dennoch außergewöhnlich gut und gibt der Musik viel Relief.

Isaac Stern’s expressive and spontaneous performances are thrilling. Young Lorin Maazel is impetuous and Ernest Ansermet makes Bartok’s music boil.

Isaac Stern est captivant dans ces lectures engages et spontanées. Le jeune Lorin Maazel est impétueux dans Tchaikovsky et Ernest Ansermet fait bouillir la musique de Bartok.
Zwei ganz spontane, charakteristische und persönliche Interpretationen mit Isaac Stern (1920-2001) sind auf dieser CD zu hören, der zweiten in der

Gesellschaft Freunde der Künste | 10.08.2013 | August 10, 2013 Tchaikovsky & Bartók
Musik Klassik: Live-Einspielungen von Isaac Stern – LUCERNE FESTIVAL Historic Performances Vol. II

„To make the violin speak", die „Violine zum Sprechen bringen", so lautete kurz und bündig die künstlerische Maxime des Geigers IsaacMehr lesen

„To make the violin speak", die „Violine zum Sprechen bringen", so lautete kurz und bündig die künstlerische Maxime des Geigers Isaac Stern.

Diese Live-Einspielungen des Zweiten Violin­konzerts von Béla Bartók und des D-Dur-Konzerts von Peter Tschaikowsky, die 1956 und 1958 bei LUCERNE FESTIVAL entstanden, verdeutlichen geradezu exemplarisch, wie Stern seine Vorstellung von musikalischer Rhetorik auf dem Konzertpodium Wirklichkeit werden ließ.

Stern konzertierte nie in Deutschland, in der Schweiz hingegen regelmäßig. Bei LUCERNE FESTIVAL war er Stammgast und trat dort zwischen 1948 und 1988 als Solist und Kammermusiker insgesamt zehn Mal auf, auch im Klaviertrio mit Eugene Istomin und Leonard Rose. Es gibt nur wenige Live-Aufnahmen mit Isaac Stern. Die Tschaikowsky- und Bartók-Einspielungen aus Luzern, die nun erstmals veröffentlicht werden, sind daher von besonderem dokumentarischen Wert und wichtige Bausteine in der umfangreichen Diskographie des 2001 verstorbenen Geigers.
„To make the violin speak", die „Violine zum Sprechen bringen", so lautete kurz und bündig die künstlerische Maxime des Geigers Isaac

Die Presse
Die Presse | 09.08.2013 | Wilhelm Sinkovicz | August 9, 2013 Festspiele Luzern: Szell, Stern, Ansermet und der junge Maazel
Aus den Archiven kommen nun bedeutende Dokumente einer eminenten Tradition

Das Tschaikowsky-Konzert unter der Leitung des jungen Lorin Maazel [...] ist vielleicht die effektvollste Darstellung dieses Werks, die derzeit auf CD greifbar ist, perfekt geschliffen nicht nur dank Sterns scharfkantig-klarem Ton, sondern auch dank der Attacke des jungen Dirigenten, der im Finale sogar zu einem veritablen Tempowettstreit mit dem Solisten anzusetzen scheint. Fazit: Unentschieden, aber ein atemberaubendes Match.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Tschaikowsky-Konzert unter der Leitung des jungen Lorin Maazel [...] ist vielleicht die effektvollste Darstellung dieses Werks, die derzeit auf CD greifbar ist, perfekt geschliffen nicht nur dank Sterns scharfkantig-klarem Ton, sondern auch dank der Attacke des jungen Dirigenten, der im Finale sogar zu einem veritablen Tempowettstreit mit dem Solisten anzusetzen scheint. Fazit: Unentschieden, aber ein atemberaubendes Match.

Basler Zeitung
Basler Zeitung | Montag, 5. August 2013 | Daniel Szpilman | August 5, 2013 Luzern ehrt die großen Meister
Historische Aufnahmen aus den Archiven des Lucerne Festival kommen auf den Markt

Die Aufnahmen spiegeln genau das, was auch die Musiker des vergangenen Jahrhunderts repräsentierten: Eleganz, Klangvielfalt und Individualität.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Aufnahmen spiegeln genau das, was auch die Musiker des vergangenen Jahrhunderts repräsentierten: Eleganz, Klangvielfalt und Individualität.

deropernfreund.de | 03.08.2013 | Egon Bezold | August 3, 2013

der große Alleskönner und Vollblutmusiker Isaac Stern, der ja die geigerische Erzählkunst so meisterlich zu realisieren verstand, spielte im August 1956 unter der Stabführung von Ernest Ansermet Béla Bartóks Violinkonzert Nr. 2, Sz.112 mit der ganzen Emotionalität seiner musikalischen Persönlichkeit. Mit großer Fantasie lässt er die Farben leuchten, enthüllt technisch superb den ganzen Reichtum der Komposition.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
der große Alleskönner und Vollblutmusiker Isaac Stern, der ja die geigerische Erzählkunst so meisterlich zu realisieren verstand, spielte im August 1956 unter der Stabführung von Ernest Ansermet Béla Bartóks Violinkonzert Nr. 2, Sz.112 mit der ganzen Emotionalität seiner musikalischen Persönlichkeit. Mit großer Fantasie lässt er die Farben leuchten, enthüllt technisch superb den ganzen Reichtum der Komposition.

Gramophone
Gramophone | October 2013 | Rob Cowan Scarred but scorching

I've always thought of lsaac Stern as a sort of Marlon Brando among violinists, a punchy, intense, uncompromisingly direct player with a muscularMehr lesen

I've always thought of lsaac Stern as a sort of Marlon Brando among violinists, a punchy, intense, uncompromisingly direct player with a muscular tone, though the upper reaches of that tone can sound both sweet and serenely pure. Stern's Sony recording of Bartók's Second Concerto under Bernstein is a vintage classic. Whether or not you will (or can) respond to this flawed Lucerne Festival performance under Ansermet (1956) will depend on your ability to tolerate performing mishaps. Odd tuning problems abound (from both Stern and the Suisse Romande Orchestra) and there are places where it sounds more like a collision than an act of musical collaboration: for example, towards the end of the first movement, Stern's E string suddenly snaps. However, there are so many genuinely poetic passages and so many instances where Ansermet captures the work's dramatic drift that I will certainly want this recording in my collection. I wasn't in the least surprised when the audience responded with such wild enthusiasm: the performance truly is a battle fought and won. The Tchaikovsky Concerto under Maazel (1958) is something else again, suave, honeyed, warmly expressed and for the most part brilliantly despatched. Mind you, when Maazel cues the finale at what sounds like an impossibly fast tempo, Stern momentarily sounds fazed, though he soon regains composure and the Concerto's (cut) closing pages go off like a rocket. What's for sure is that this well-recorded document enshrines real performances that get to the heart of the matter, warts and all.
I've always thought of lsaac Stern as a sort of Marlon Brando among violinists, a punchy, intense, uncompromisingly direct player with a muscular

Record Geijutsu
Record Geijutsu | January 2014

japanische Rezension siehe PDFMehr lesen

japanische Rezension siehe PDF
japanische Rezension siehe PDF

Merchant Infos

Isaac Stern plays Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto, Op. 35 and Bartók: Violin Concerto No. 2, Sz. 112
article number: 95.624
EAN barcode: 4022143956248
price group: BCB
release date: 9. August 2013
total time: 69 min.

More from these Composers

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...