Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

French Saxophone - 20th Century Music for Saxophone & Orchestra

97500 - French Saxophone - 20th Century Music for Saxophone & Orchestra

aud 97.500
please choose the quality
Auto-Rip:
When you complete a purchase of a physical album (including CDs, vinyl and other formats), a free MP3 version of that album is added to your basket.

“Its greatest merit, in my opinion, lies in the transformable beauty of its accent, at times heavy and calm, at times passionate, dreamlike or melancholy, or indefinite [...] like the mysterious vibrations of a bell long after it has been struck.“ Hector Berlioz in an early appreciation of...more

"Dominique Tassots Interpretationen lassen keine Wünsche offen, ob impressionistische Schwüle, klangliche Innigkeit oder technische Fallen, stets passt sich Tassot den musikalischen Erfordernissen genial und mit virtuoser Sicherheit an. Ebenso Lob verdient das Münchner Rundfunkorchester unter der Stabführung von Manfred Neuman, das einfühlsam und nie in den Vordergrund sich drängen die Werke in ihrer jeweiligen spezifischen Klanglichkeit ehrlich wiedergibt." (Das Orchester)

Informationen

“Its greatest merit, in my opinion, lies in the transformable beauty of its accent, at times heavy and calm, at times passionate, dreamlike or melancholy, or indefinite [...] like the mysterious vibrations of a bell long after it has been struck.“
Hector Berlioz in an early appreciation of the saxophone

Even before jazz musicians came to appreciate the fullness of tone, richness of nuances and sonic flexibility of the saxophone, French composers made the most of the instrument’s poetic qualities praised by Berlioz. Despite this, the instrument has not to date been able to establish itself in the classical orchestra - its idiosyncratic tone, ever-present and fluctuating between vocal urgency and jazz associations, is not sufficiently compatible with the classical-romantic sonic ideal. This recording presents the works not in their customary adaptation with piano accompaniment, but in their original instrumentations for soloistic saxophone and orchestra. Only in this way can the works’ great instrumental variety and compositional originality be shown. They come from the French repertoire - with the exception of the Fantaisie-Caprice of the Belgian Absil - and were composed between 1903 and 1971. Four of the five works (with the exception of Debussy’s Rapsodie) are world premiere recordings of the original versions with orchestra or chamber ensemble.

Dominique Tassot is one of the leading saxophone soloists internationally. Invitations to perform as an orchestral soloist have led this prize winner of international competitions to numerous European symphony orchestras. A special concern of Dominique Tassot’s is the dissemination of large-scale but unknown original literature for saxophone and orchestra, which is reflected in the present production.
The conductor and hornist Manfred Neuman began his career as a hornist at the Cologne Opera before becoming a member of the Saarbrücken Radio Symphony Orchestra in 1976. His activity as a guest conductor regularly leads him to symphony orchestras at home and abroad.
The Munich Radio Orchestra was founded in 1952 and has since then constantly developed into a sound body with an enormously broad artistic spectrum. Since 1998 its Music Director has been Marcello Viotti.

Reviews

American Record Guide | September/October 2004 | Ritter | September 1, 2004

This release has four works that are offered in their original orchestral guise for the first time on CD. But what makes it so important is theMehr lesen

This release has four works that are offered in their original orchestral guise for the first time on CD. But what makes it so important is the inclusion of the massive, growling, brazen concerto of Henri Tomasi (1901-71). His father was a researcher in folk music, and Tomasi studied at the Paris Conservatory, later becoming founder of the famous group “Triton”, along with Poulenc, Prokofieff, Milhaud, and many others. This exposure to multiple cultures (the son of Corsican parents, and raised in Marseille) had an effect on his rather hard-to-define style. Saxophonists have known this work for years, so it is hard to believe that it has taken so long to get its first full recording. But now that we have it, there is a great cause for rejoicing, because this performance should set the standard for many years.

Usually when we hear saxophone and orchestra, we are hearing a chamber group or reduced forces with only a few woodwinds and the occasional brass. But Tomasi understood the power of the instrument and did not hold back when considering his instrumentation. This is a full-orchestra setting, and the lets the instrument sail above massive string lines and high-pitched trumpets. Multiple meters and loud, punctuating percussion only add to the excitement in this most assertive of all saxophone concertos. Tomasi was a prolific composer and wrote in all genres, but none that I have heard match the effectiveness of this extraordinary work.

The rest of the recital is unfortunately not as exciting. Andre Caplet is probably most known for his arrangement of the work of Debussy, and he is the author of many delightful chamber works, like his Piano Quintet. His “Legends” is very atmospheric, impressionist and Wagnerian in harmony, and bears only a slight resemblance to some of the more “mystical” (notes) work that he would produce later in his career. While the piece is charming in its introverted melodic consciousness, the whole seems to meander somewhat, and one comes away from it curiously unsatisfied.

Far better is the “Concert Music” for saxophone and 12 instruments by Marius Constant (born 1925). Of Romanian and French parentage, Constant uses a blend of intimate techniques and chamber textures to set the stage for his own unique variety of neoclassicism. The instrumentation (three brass, three strings, three woodwinds, piano and percussion), lends an Alban Berg feel to the musical grain, while reminding us more of Stravinsky in his confused pre-serial music. But Constant never for a moment abandons melody as the driving force in his work, and the four movements of this suite ably sustain the ideas he puts forth, holding the interest and flooding us with color.

Jean Absil (1893-1974) does little to assist us in our appreciation of his music with this late (1971) “Fantasy-Caprice”. Earlier in his career he was somewhat of an enfant-terrible with his (at least theoretical) embrace of atonality, but later he backed off and produced rather straight-laced, lyrical music with many ascetic qualities. Such is the case here, and while some of the effects are not without interest, the work rambles on with little to hold our aural or intellectual curiosity.

And for those so inclined, this is absolutely the best recorded performance of Debussy’s awful “Rhapsody” that I have ever heard. The bold, snarling brass and warm, vibrant strings almost made me like that piece. Well, face it, the composer did it for money, admitted he knew next to nothing about the saxophone, didn’t orchestrate it, and now has the honor of turning in about the worst piece for a solo instrument by a major composer. It has some moments, and when played like this, a lot of excitement, though it will always be an also-ran in my book. But the name is Debussy, so it will continue to be a mainstay – perhaps even the most recorded piece for saxophone. If this was my only recording, that would be just fine with me, as it is really wonderful, though it does not quite erase the names of Jean-Marie Londeix (Martinon on EMI) and Sigurd Rascher (Bernstein on Sony) – both currently available.

Audite has supplied stunning sound for Mr Tassot – a crackerjack player if ever there was one – and the Munich Radio Orchestra sounds here for all the world like the best group in the history of recordings. The Tomasi alone would sell me; other will have to decide if the plusses outweigh the minusses. The notes are excellent.
This release has four works that are offered in their original orchestral guise for the first time on CD. But what makes it so important is the

Audiophile Audition
Audiophile Audition | July-August 2004 | John Sunier | July 1, 2004

As a fan of classical saxophone it was surprising to me to see that all theMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
As a fan of classical saxophone it was surprising to me to see that all the

www.musicweb-international.com
www.musicweb-international.com | 21.05.2004 | Rob Barnett | May 21, 2004

Here is a provocatively attractive and varied collection that should appeal to saxophone buffs as well as enthusiasts of these composers and thisMehr lesen

Here is a provocatively attractive and varied collection that should appeal to saxophone buffs as well as enthusiasts of these composers and this style-genre. With the exception of the Debussy these are all uncommon works and will attract interest ... and more.

The Tomasi shows Tassot as a soloist able to coax honey and amber from the sax. The legato phrasing is notable slightly coloured with a jazzy voice. The music has the motion of sea-wrack and deep green tones. The second episode is more animated with a ‘Bolero’ stomp. The brass can be scaldingly Baxian and the boiling climaxes at 7.01 and 11.15 are redolent of La Valse (again a Ravel cross-reference). Soon we return to the warbling and rough-rolling brass - a little like Messiaen meets Bax. There are only two movements the second of which starts with a sinister Baxian chase. This is extremely effective music also reminding me of the music of Louis Aubert (the superb Tombeau de Chateaubriand - hear it on Marco Polo) and the melodramatic Bernard Herrmann. Tomasi is well worth dedicated exploration and persistence as the Lyrinx CD (LYR 227) also reviewed here further bears out. I have been working on a review of his gorgeous opera Don Juan for several months now.

I was much looking forward to the Caplet having heard his scorchingly imaginative and tragic Epiphanie for cello and orchestra last year. This Légende dates from much earlier in the composer's short life at a time when the saxophone enjoyed its first solo celebrity. It is a rhapsodically extended piece with a pleasing serenading character but without the scorch and acid of Epiphanie. The work was uncovered as recently as 1988 by Londeix. This is the first recording of its version with orchestra. The version for saxophone and alto saxophone, string quintet, oboe, clarinet and bassoon (1903) was recorded by Arno Bornkamp (saxophone) on Brilliant 6476. It has the liquidly mellifluous yearn and yield of the Glazunov concerto crossed with the idyllic Delius. The Absil is the most recent piece here, light on the palate but a little dry.

Marius Constant had a French father and a Rumanian mother. He studied in Paris with Tony Aubin and Olivier Messiaen. He also studied with Jean Fournet (whose outstanding Debussy on Supraphon Archive, I have just reviewed) and Arthur Honegger. While we Brits brag about BBC Radio 3 and its illustrious predecessor, The Third Programme, France had ‘France Musique’, a station which grew under Constant’s direction. The Musique de Concert is for sax plus three each woodwind and brass plus strings, piano and percussion. The whole thing is done in just over ten minutes across five varied and jewelled movements in which the musical influences are compendious from Swingle-style Bach, to jazz, to avant-garde alienation, to rhythmic and dissonant ‘pepper’. Finally comes the Debussy. This is all plush and dripping honey, gurgling dances and warm dawns. The orchestra score a wondrous warmth at 2.19.

That’s four of the five pieces appearing here in world premiere recordings. The Debussy provides the ‘sheet anchor’ of comparative familiarity.

I really liked this collection. It is well played in every department. The selection reflects an audacity and valour rare in today’s industry.
Here is a provocatively attractive and varied collection that should appeal to saxophone buffs as well as enthusiasts of these composers and this

klassik-heute.com
klassik-heute.com | 21.05.2004 | Wolfgang Stähr | May 21, 2004

„Premiere Recording“: viermal leuchtet dieser Hinweis in lindgrünerMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
„Premiere Recording“: viermal leuchtet dieser Hinweis in lindgrüner

Das Orchester | 5/2004 | Werner Bodendorff | May 1, 2004

Ersteinspielungen bergen stets einen eigentümlichen Reiz, besonders wennMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ersteinspielungen bergen stets einen eigentümlichen Reiz, besonders wenn

www.ResMusica.com
www.ResMusica.com | 21.03.2004 | Maxime Kaprielian | March 21, 2004 Henri Tomasi, Le Retour

Henri Tomasi (1901-1971) fait partie de ces compositeurs françaisMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Henri Tomasi (1901-1971) fait partie de ces compositeurs français

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | 2/2004 | Rémy Franck | February 1, 2004

Der französische Saxophonist Dominique Tassot – er unterrichtet in Mézières-Charleville – spielt auf dieser thematisch wohlgeformten CD dieMehr lesen

Der französische Saxophonist Dominique Tassot – er unterrichtet in Mézières-Charleville – spielt auf dieser thematisch wohlgeformten CD die Saxophon-Konzerte von Henri Tomasi und Marius Constant, ‚Légende’ von André Caplet, ‚Fantasie-Caprice’ von Jean Absil und die ‚Rhapsodie’ von Claude Debussy. Das ist ein wichtiges Repertoire, das zum Teil noch nie auf einer CD zu hören war und in tadellosen Interpretationen vorgelegt wird. Da ist kein Platz für Eitelkeiten, falsche Gesten, Prätentiöses, nur das Wesentliche zählt, und es gelingt. Dies mag zuerst am authentischen Saxophonspiel Tassots liegen, aber gewiss auch an den Stimmungen, die Manfred Neuman aus dem Münchner Rundfunkorchester hervorlockt. Zudem wurde das Saxophon in eine für mich geradezu optimale Balance mit dem Orchester gebracht.
Der französische Saxophonist Dominique Tassot – er unterrichtet in Mézières-Charleville – spielt auf dieser thematisch wohlgeformten CD die

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 2/2004 | Svenja Klaucke | February 1, 2004 Rehabilitation?

Im Jazz hat es längst die unterschiedlichsten Belastungsproben bestanden, von den romantischen Gedankengängen eines Stan Getz bis zu denMehr lesen

Im Jazz hat es längst die unterschiedlichsten Belastungsproben bestanden, von den romantischen Gedankengängen eines Stan Getz bis zu den bruitistischen Zerlegungen von Peter Brötzmann. In der Klassik hingegen spielt das Saxophon eine merkwürdig traurige Rolle. Denn wenn nicht gerade Blues, Rag und Foxtrott unter den Orchestersatz gemischt wurden, war das Saxophon so ziemlich verloren. Auf Dauer reichten da weder die Klangfarben-Veredelungen noch eine lyrische Geschmeidigkeit aus, die besonders in Frankreich dem Saxophon von einer durchaus prominenten Komponistenschar anvertraut worden war.
Fünf Werke aus dem 20. Jahrhundert hat jetzt Altsaxophonist Dominque Tassot ausgewählt, um für ein wenig Wiedergutmachung zu sorgen. Wobei Tassot bis auf Debussys Rhapsodie gleich vier Weltersteinspielungen bietet. Doch so weit gespannt diese Chronologie des Saxophon-Spiels ist, so ist der Ausdrucksradius eindimensional und auf Dauer kaum aufregend. Denn was André Caplets „Légende“ von 1903 und die jüngste Komposition von Jean Absil („Fantaisie-Caprice“ von 1971) zusammenhält, trifft nahezu auf alle anderen Stücke zu. Arabeske Nobelesse, rhythmische Gebilde aus Varieté und Jazz, poetische Schmiegsamkeit und diese für das Saxophon typische Pierrot-Haltung sind in unterschiedlichen Portionen und Proportionen verteilt. Allein Debussys schwül-orientalische Rhapsodie sorgt hier für einen künstlerischen Eigenwert des Saxophons, das bei Dominique Tassot mit vollem, runden Ton glänzen und überaus charmant sein kann.
Im Jazz hat es längst die unterschiedlichsten Belastungsproben bestanden, von den romantischen Gedankengängen eines Stan Getz bis zu den

Stereoplay
Stereoplay | 1/2004 | Holger Arnold | January 1, 2004

Durch seinen Siegeszug in der Militär- und Unterhaltungsmusik sowie imMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Durch seinen Siegeszug in der Militär- und Unterhaltungsmusik sowie im

Classix
Classix | # 7 | Felix F. Falk | January 1, 2004 Erfrischend

Mit seinem speziellen Ton, der selbst Debussy rätselhaft war, blieb dasMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mit seinem speziellen Ton, der selbst Debussy rätselhaft war, blieb das

Saarländischer Rundfunk
Saarländischer Rundfunk | 13.12.2003 | Dr. Friedrich Spangenmacher | December 13, 2003

...<br /> Kommen wir zur nächsten CD mit Saxophonkonzerten Frankreichs aus demMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
...
Kommen wir zur nächsten CD mit Saxophonkonzerten Frankreichs aus dem

Crescendo
Crescendo | 6/2003 | Katharina Honke | December 1, 2003

Eine Bigband ohne Saxophon? Undenkbar! Ein Sinfonieorchester mit Saxophon?Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Eine Bigband ohne Saxophon? Undenkbar! Ein Sinfonieorchester mit Saxophon?

Deutschlandfunk
Deutschlandfunk | Die neue Platte vom 12.10.2003 | Ludwig Rink | October 12, 2003 BROADCAST Die neue Platte: French Saxophone - 20th Century Music for Saxophone & Orchestra
Dominique Tassot, Saxophon und das Münchner Rundfunkorchester

Die Beziehungen zwischen der philharmonischen Welt der großen Orchester und dem Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts erfundenen Saxophon sind nicht besondersMehr lesen

Die Beziehungen zwischen der philharmonischen Welt der großen Orchester und dem Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts erfundenen Saxophon sind nicht besonders eng. Das Label "audite" bietet jetzt ab November eine CD an, die Begegnungen von Saxophon und Orchester dokumentiert.

Das von dem rührigen französischen Instrumentenbauer Adolphe Sax entwickelte konische Blechblasinstrument mit einfachem Rohrblatt fand zwar nach seiner Patentierung 1846 relativ schnell Eingang in die Militärkapellen der Zeit, jedoch kaum ein Komponist integrierte es - und wenn, dann nur gelegentlich - ins Sinfonieorchester. Nur in wenigen Opern- oder Orchesterpartituren wird es verlangt: so unter anderem. in einigen Werken von Meyerbeer, Massenet, Ambroise Thomas, Bizet, Debussy, Ravel, Strawinsky, Hindemith, Bartok, Berg oder Honegger. Im Jazz sieht die Sache ganz anders aus, den kann man sich im kleinen Ensemble oder der Big-Band ohne Saxophon kaum vorstellen, und die Namen großer Solisten wie Sidney Bechet, Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, Gerry Mulligan oder John Coltrane sind weit über die Fangemeinde hinaus bekannt. Klassische Werke für Saxophon und Klavier gibt es eine ganze Reihe, und auch Solokonzerte für Saxophon und Orchester hört man gelegentlich im Konzertsaal: relativ bekannt wurden da Werke von Jacques Ibert, Claude Debussy, Alexander Glasunow und Frank Martin. Das in Detmold ansässige Label "audite" bietet jetzt ab November eine CD an, die manche Begegnungen von Saxophon und Orchester im 20. Jahrhundert dokumentiert - und diese Begegnungen fanden vor allem in Frankreich statt.

Musikbeispiel: Henri Tomasi - 'Cadence’ aus: Concerto für Saxophon und Orchester

Das ist Dominique Tassot, der Solist unserer heutigen Sendung. Er ist 43 Jahre alt, studierte in Metz und am Pariser Conservatoire, gewann verschiedene Wettbewerbe, ist Mitglied eines Saxophon-Quartetts und war an mehreren Produktionen und Uraufführungen beteiligt. Heute unterrichtet er als Professor am Konservatorium der Ardennen-Stadt Charleville und ist als Solist und Kammermusiker tätig. Zusammen mit dem deutschen Hornisten und Dirigenten Manfred Neuman fasste er den Plan, unter dem Motto "French Saxophone" Solokonzerte des 20. Jahrhunderts für Saxophon und Orchester beispielhaft aufzunehmen. Heraus kam eine CD, die insgesamt 5 Konzerte bietet, von denen bis auf eins, die Rhapsodie von Debussy, alle erstmals auf Platte erscheinen. Dabei sind Debussys Werk und die "Légende" von André Caplet in diesem Jahr 100 Jahre alt, das "Concerto" von Henri Tomasi stammt von 1949, die von der Tonsprache "modernste" "Musique de Concert" von Marius Constant ist fast 50 Jahre alt, während das "jüngste" Stück die 1971 komponierte "Fantaisie-Caprice" des Belgiers Jean Absil ist. Mit vier Ersteinspielungen also bereits eine fürs Repertoire wichtige Aufnahme, ist die technische und musikalische Qualität der CD hervorzuheben. Dafür bürgt neben dem souveränen und in diesem Stil hocherfahrenen Solisten auch das Münchner Rundfunkorchester, das in der Hierarchie des Bayerischen Rundfunks zwar erst nach dem Rundfunksinfonieorchester kommt, dem es aber gelingt, sich in einer Vielzahl geschickt genutzter Repertoire-Nischen immer wieder mit makellosen Aufnahmen zu Wort zu melden.

Musikbeispiel: Marius Constant - ‘Intermezzo’ aus: "Musique de Concert" für Saxophon und Orchester

Soweit ein "Intermezzo" aus der "Musique de Concert" für Saxophon und zwölf Instrumente von Marius Constant. Von großer formaler Klarheit ist die Fantaisie-Caprice des Belgiers Jean Absil: In jungen Jahren ein glühender Verfechter von Polytonalität und Atonalität, klingt dieses Alterswerk wie eine Rückkehr in romantische Gefilde.

Musikbeispiel: Jean Absil - aus: "Fantaisie-Caprice" für Saxophon und Orchester

Im ebenso umfangreichen wie lesenswerten Booklet-Text zur CD schildert Autor Michael Struck-Schloen anschaulich die Entstehungsgeschichte der beiden ältesten der hier eingespielten Konzerte. Er schreibt: " Einen ... kuriosen, gleichwohl folgenreichen Fall von Geburtshilfe leistete ... die Französin Elise Boyer, die 1887 den Bostoner Arzt Richard Hall ehelichte und später – als "Therapie" gegen ihre progressive Gehörlosigkeit – das Saxophon erlernte. Weil Literatur für das Instrument verschwindend gering war, ging Elise Boyer-Hall die vornehmsten französischen und belgischen Komponisten um neue Werke an. Nur Wenige (darunter Gabriel Fauré und Ernest Chausson) konnten den Lockungen des üppigen Auftragshonorars widerstehen, und so gingen bei der Dame in Boston schließlich Partituren von Claude Debussy, André Caplet, Florent Schmitt und Vincent d’Indy ein, die heute zum "klassischen" Stamm des Saxophon-Repertoires zählen."
Da es sich bei Madame Boyer nicht um einen Profi, sondern um eine engagierte Amateur-Spielerin handelte, stellt das Stück von Caplet den Solopart nicht in den Vordergrund, sondern bettet das Saxophon sozusagen ein in die Gruppe der Holzbläser im Orchester, die hier aus Oboe, Klarinette und Fagott besteht. Trotz des vielsagenden Titels "Légende" hat Caplet keine Programm-Musik komponiert, sondern wollte damit wohl eher den insgesamt romantischen Ton dieses 1905 von Elise Boyer-Hall in Boston uraufgeführten Stückes charakterisieren.

Musikbeispiel: André Caplet - aus: "Légende" für Saxophon und Orchester

Für Claude Debussy war die Auftragsarbeit für Elise Boyer-Hall wohl eher eine etwas lästige Pflicht, die sich auch länger hinzog. Etwas herablassend berichtet er 1903 einem Freund: "Das Saxophon ist ein Rohrblatt-Tier, mit dessen Gewohnheiten ich wenig vertraut bin. Liebt es die romantische Süße der Klarinetten oder die etwas grobschlächtige Ironie des Sarrusofons? Am Ende habe ich es melancholische Weisen murmeln lassen, zum Wirbel einer Militärtrommel."

Als Titel zog Debussy "Arabische", "Maurische" oder "Orientalische" Rhapsodie in Betracht, um es schließlich beim neutraleren Begriff "Rhapsodie" zu belassen.

Musikbeispiel: Claude Debussy - aus: "Rapsodie" für Saxophon und Orchester

Die Neue Platte – heute mit französischer Saxophon-Musik des 20. Jahrhunderts, gespielt von Dominique Tassot und dem Münchner Rundfunkorchester unter der Leitung von Manfred Neuman.
Die Beziehungen zwischen der philharmonischen Welt der großen Orchester und dem Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts erfundenen Saxophon sind nicht besonders

DeutschlandRadio
DeutschlandRadio | 12.10.2003 | Ludwig Rink | October 12, 2003

Die neue Platte – heute mit Musik für Saxophon und Orchester, und dazu begrüßt Sie am Mikrofon Ludwig Rink. Die Beziehungen zwischen derMehr lesen

Die neue Platte – heute mit Musik für Saxophon und Orchester, und dazu begrüßt Sie am Mikrofon Ludwig Rink. Die Beziehungen zwischen der philharmonischen Welt der großen Orchester und dem Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts erfundenen Saxophon sind nicht besonders eng. Das von dem rührigen französischen Instrumentenbauer Adolphe Sax entwickelte konische Blechblasinstrument mit einfachem Rohrblatt fand zwar nach seiner Patentierung 1846 relativ schnell Eingang in die Militärkapellen der Zeit, jedoch kaum ein Komponist integrierte es - und wenn, dann nur gelegentlich - ins Sinfonieorchester. Nur in wenigen Opern- oder Orchesterpartituren wird es verlangt: so u.a. in einigen Werken von Meyerbeer, Massenet, Ambroise Thomas, Bizet, Debussy, Ravel, Strawinsky, Hindemith, Bartok, Berg oder Honegger. Im Jazz sieht die Sache ganz anders aus, den kann man sich im kleinen Ensemble oder der Big-Band ohne Saxophon kaum vorstellen, und die Namen großer Solisten wie Sidney Bechet, Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, Gerry Mulligan oder John Coltrane sind weit über die Fangemeinde hinaus bekannt. Klassische Werke für Saxophon und Klavier gibt es eine ganze Reihe, und auch Solokonzerte für Saxophon und Orchester hört man gelegentlich im Konzertsaal: relativ bekannt wurden da Werke von Jacques Ibert, Claude Debussy, Alexander Glasunow und Frank Martin. Das in Detmold ansässige Label „audite“ bietet jetzt ab November eine CD an, die manche Begegnungen von Saxophon und Orchester im 20. Jahrhundert dokumentiert - und diese Begegnungen fanden vor allem in Frankreich statt.
(Musikbeispiel: Henri Tomasi - 'Cadence’ aus: Concerto für Saxophon und Orchester)
Das ist Dominique Tassot, der Solist unserer heutigen Sendung. Er ist 43 Jahre alt, studierte in Metz und am Pariser Conservatoire, gewann verschiedene Wettbewerbe, ist Mitglied eines Saxophon-Quartetts und war an mehreren Produktionen und Uraufführungen beteiligt. Heute unterrichtet er als Professor am Konservatorium der Ardennen-Stadt Charleville und ist als Solist und Kammermusiker tätig. Zusammen mit dem deutschen Hornisten und Dirigenten Manfred Neuman fasste er den Plan, unter dem Motto „French Saxophone“ Solokonzerte des 20. Jahrhunderts für Saxophon und Orchester beispielhaft aufzunehmen. Heraus kam eine CD, die insgesamt 5 Konzerte bietet, von denen bis auf eins, die Rhapsodie von Debussy, alle erstmals auf Platte erscheinen. Dabei sind Debussys Werk und die „Légende“ von André Caplet in diesem Jahr 100 Jahre alt, das „Concerto“ von Henri Tomasi stammt von 1949, die von der Tonsprache „modernste“ „Musique de Concert“ von Marius Constant ist fast 50 Jahre alt, während das „jüngste“ Stück die 1971 komponierte „Fantaisie-Caprice“ des Belgiers Jean Absil ist. Mit vier Ersteinspielungen also bereits eine fürs Repertoire wichtige Aufnahme, ist die technische und musikalische Qualität der CD hervorzuheben. Dafür bürgt neben dem souveränen und in diesem Stil hocherfahrenen Solisten auch das Münchner Rundfunkorchester, das in der Hierarchie des Bayerischen Rundfunks zwar erst nach dem Rundfunksinfonieorchester kommt, dem es aber gelingt, sich in einer Vielzahl geschickt genutzter Repertoire-Nischen immer wieder mit makellosen Aufnahmen zu Wort zu melden.
(Musikbeispiel: Marius Constant - ‘Intermezzo’ aus: „Musique de Concert“ für Saxophon und Orchester)
Soweit ein „Intermezzo“ aus der „Musique de Concert“ für Saxophon und zwölf Instrumente von Marius Constant. Von großer formaler Klarheit ist die Fantaisie-Caprice des Belgiers Jean Absil: In jungen Jahren ein glühender Verfechter von Polytonalität und Atonalität, klingt dieses Alterswerk wie eine Rückkehr in romantische Gefilde.
(Musikbeispiel: Jean Absil - aus: „Fantaisie-Caprice“ für Saxophon und Orchester)
Im ebenso umfangreichen wie lesenswerten Booklet-Text zur CD schildert Autor Michael Struck-Schloen anschaulich die Entstehungsgeschichte der beiden ältesten der hier eingespielten Konzerte. Er schreibt: „ Einen ... kuriosen, gleichwohl folgenreichen Fall von Geburtshilfe leistete ... die Französin Elise Boyer, die 1887 den Bostoner Arzt Richard Hall ehelichte und später – als „Therapie“ gegen ihre progressive Gehörlosigkeit – das Saxophon erlernte. Weil Literatur für das Instrument verschwindend gering war, ging Elise Boyer-Hall die vornehmsten französischen und belgischen Komponisten um neue Werke an. Nur Wenige (darunter Gabriel Fauré und Ernest Chausson) konnten den Lockungen des üppigen Auftragshonorars widerstehen, und so gingen bei der Dame in Boston schließlich Partituren von Claude Debussy, André Caplet, Florent Schmitt und Vincent d’Indy ein, die heute zum „klassischen“ Stamm des Saxophon-Repertoires zählen.“
Da es sich bei Madame Boyer nicht um einen Profi, sondern um eine engagierte Amateur-Spielerin handelte, stellt das Stück von Caplet den Solopart nicht in den Vordergrund, sondern bettet das Saxophon sozusagen ein in die Gruppe der Holzbläser im Orchester, die hier aus Oboe, Klarinette und Fagott besteht. Trotz des vielsagenden Titels „Légende“ hat Caplet keine Programm-Musik komponiert, sondern wollte damit wohl eher den insgesamt romantischen Ton dieses 1905 von Elise Boyer-Hall in Boston uraufgeführten Stückes charakterisieren.
(Musikbeispiel: André Caplet - aus: „Légende“ für Saxophon und Orchester)
Für Claude Debussy war die Auftragsarbeit für Elise Boyer-Hall wohl eher eine etwas lästige Pflicht, die sich auch länger hinzog. Etwas herablassend berichtet er 1903 einem Freund: „Das Saxophon ist ein Rohrblatt-Tier, mit dessen Gewohnheiten ich wenig vertraut bin. Liebt es die romantische Süße der Klarinetten oder die etwas grobschlächtige Ironie des Sarrusofons? Am Ende habe ich es melancholische Weisen murmeln lassen, zum Wirbel einer Militärtrommel.“ Als Titel zog Debussy „Arabische“, „Maurische“ oder „Orientalische“ Rhapsodie in Betracht, um es schließlich beim neutraleren Begriff „Rhapsodie“ zu belassen.
(Musikbeispiel: Claude Debussy - aus: „Rapsodie“ für Saxophon und Orchester)
Die Neue Platte – heute mit französischer Saxophon-Musik des 20. Jahrhunderts, gespielt von Dominique Tassot und dem Münchner Rundfunkorchester unter der Leitung von Manfred Neuman.
Die neue Platte – heute mit Musik für Saxophon und Orchester, und dazu begrüßt Sie am Mikrofon Ludwig Rink. Die Beziehungen zwischen der

Merchant Infos

French Saxophone - 20th Century Music for Saxophone & Orchestra
article number: 97.500
EAN barcode: 4022143975003
price group: BCA
release date: 1. November 2003
total time: 63 min.

News

date /
Typ
title
Rating
Mar 7, 2005
Award

Klangqualität: 8/10 - French Saxophone - 20th Century Music for Saxophone & Orchestra
Mar 7, 2005
Award

Klang: 4/5 - French Saxophone - 20th Century Music for Saxophone & Orchestra
Mar 7, 2005
Award

4/5 Noten - French Saxophone - 20th Century Music for Saxophone & Orchestra
Mar 7, 2005
Award

Wertung Interpretation: 9/10 - French Saxophone - 20th Century Music for Saxophone & Orchestra
Mar 14, 2016
Review

Deutschlandfunk
BROADCAST Die neue Platte: French Saxophone - 20th Century Music for Saxophone & Orchestra
Mar 7, 2005
Review

American Record Guide
This release has four works that are offered in their original orchestral guise...
Mar 7, 2005
Review

Audiophile Audition
As a fan of classical saxophone it was surprising to me to see that all the...
Mar 7, 2005
Review

www.musicweb-international.com
Here is a provocatively attractive and varied collection that should appeal to...
Mar 7, 2005
Review

www.ResMusica.com
Henri Tomasi, Le Retour
Mar 7, 2005
Review

klassik-heute.com
„Premiere Recording“: viermal leuchtet dieser Hinweis in lindgrüner Schrift...
Mar 7, 2005
Review

Das Orchester
Ersteinspielungen bergen stets einen eigentümlichen Reiz, besonders wenn es...
Mar 7, 2005
Review

Saarländischer Rundfunk
... Kommen wir zur nächsten CD mit Saxophonkonzerten Frankreichs aus dem 20ten...
Mar 7, 2005
Review

Classix
Erfrischend
Mar 7, 2005
Review

Fono Forum
Rehabilitation?
Mar 7, 2005
Review

Pizzicato
Der französische Saxophonist Dominique Tassot – er unterrichtet in...
Mar 7, 2005
Review

Stereoplay
Durch seinen Siegeszug in der Militär- und Unterhaltungsmusik sowie im Jazz ist...
Mar 7, 2005
Review

Crescendo
Eine Bigband ohne Saxophon? Undenkbar! Ein Sinfonieorchester mit Saxophon?...
Mar 7, 2005
Review

DeutschlandRadio
Die neue Platte – heute mit Musik für Saxophon und Orchester, und dazu...

More from

More from this Genre

...