Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Robert Schumann: Complete Symphonic Works, Vol. V

97718 - Robert Schumann: Complete Symphonic Works, Vol. V

aud 97.718
Bitte Qualität wählen

Robert SchumannComplete Symphonic Works, Vol. V

In Schumann’s œuvre for solo instruments and orchestra, the Konzertstücke complement his solo concertos. Confined to one movement, they are more concentrated, more pointed in their characters and freer in the development of their ideas than their bigger siblings. The covertly multi-movement piece for four horns also harnesses the formal and poetic experience of the Fourth Symphony: Schumann was a composer with open borders.more

"Heinz Holliger continues to explore Schumann’s symphonic works in a very clear and analytical way. The highlight of the CDs is the very fresh and vivid performance of the Violin Concerto." (Pizzicato)

Track List

Please choose the preferred audio format:
Stereo
Surround
Quality

Robert Schumann Konzertstück for Piano & Orchestra in D Minor, Op. 134 (15:51) Alexander Lonquich | WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln | Heinz Holliger

Robert Schumann Konzertstück for Piano & Orchestra in G Major, Op. 92 (16:03) Alexander Lonquich | WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln | Heinz Holliger

Robert Schumann Konzertstück for Four Horns & Orchestra, Op. 86 (19:45) Paul van Zelm | Ludwig Rast | Rainer Jurkiewicz | Joachim Pöltl | WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln | Heinz Holliger

Multimedia

Informationen

​Schumann's Konzertstücke complement his solo concertos. Confined to one movement, they are more concentrated, more pointed in their characters and freer in the development of their ideas than their bigger siblings.

Patricia Kopatchinskaja puts her own stamp onto this compact genre. Corresponding to her performance of the Violin Concerto (Vol. 4), she also interprets the Violin Fantasy without any Romantic bias. She traces Schumann's contrasts with a broad sound palette, clear sounds alternating with intensive vibrato, and virtuoso passages characterised by nimble agility. The Fantasy finds its expression in Kopatchinskaja's free approach.

Alexander Lonquich
's performance of the two Konzertstücke for piano follows an individual, but nonetheless Romantic reading, favouring rich sounds and carefully controlled accentuation as a means of expression.

The covertly multi-movement Konzertstück for Four Horns reveals Schumann's symphonic experience: he softens the boundaries of the symphony as a genre in the Classical-Romantic tradition.

April will see the release of the Schumann edition's final volume, showcasing the "Zwickau" Symphony as well as the complete Overtures.

Reviews

Correspondenz Robert Schumann Gesellschaft
Correspondenz Robert Schumann Gesellschaft | Nr. 39 / Januar 2017 | Gerd Nauhaus | January 1, 2017

Wir erleben ein homogenes Quartett, aus dem sich die halsbrecherisch schwierige 1. Hornpartie bei Bedarf heraushebt, das aber in lyrischen wie dramatischen Partien mühelos seinen Mann steht, so dass eine der mitreißendsten Darbietungen des Konzertstücks entsteht, die der heutige Musikmarkt zu bieten hat.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Wir erleben ein homogenes Quartett, aus dem sich die halsbrecherisch schwierige 1. Hornpartie bei Bedarf heraushebt, das aber in lyrischen wie dramatischen Partien mühelos seinen Mann steht, so dass eine der mitreißendsten Darbietungen des Konzertstücks entsteht, die der heutige Musikmarkt zu bieten hat.

Stereo
Stereo | 1/2017 Januar | Arnt Cobbers | January 1, 2017 Kritiker-Umfrage: Die zehn besten CDs 2016

Arndt Cobbers: 2. Schumann, Sämtliche Sinfonische Werke Vol. 5; Kopatchinskaja, Lonquich, WDR Sinfonieorchester, Holliger (Audite): Das alsMehr lesen

Arndt Cobbers: 2. Schumann, Sämtliche Sinfonische Werke Vol. 5; Kopatchinskaja, Lonquich, WDR Sinfonieorchester, Holliger (Audite): Das als problematisch geltende Spätwerk in fesselnden Interpretationen.
Arndt Cobbers: 2. Schumann, Sämtliche Sinfonische Werke Vol. 5; Kopatchinskaja, Lonquich, WDR Sinfonieorchester, Holliger (Audite): Das als

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung | Montag, 19. September 2016 Nr. 219 | Jan Brachmann | September 19, 2016 Redet diese Musik, träumt sie?
Zwei Editionen mit den Konzerten von Robert Schumann wetteifern um die Deutung – auf hohem Niveau

Patricia Kopatchinskaja, die sonst gern alles gegen den Strich zu bürsten sucht, geht das Konzertstück sensibel an, als würde ihre Geige leise weinen in der Höhe zu einem Orchesterlied ohne Worte. Spannungsreich sind ihre Pianissimi, von Akzenten durchzuckt. In einer Illusion des Improvisierten hört man dem allmählichen Verfertigen der Musik beim Spielen zu. Und der große Apparat des Orchesters, die gelegentliche Brillanz der Soli haben dabei nur den Sinn, Palisaden zu ziehen rings um die Gärten dieses Traums.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Patricia Kopatchinskaja, die sonst gern alles gegen den Strich zu bürsten sucht, geht das Konzertstück sensibel an, als würde ihre Geige leise weinen in der Höhe zu einem Orchesterlied ohne Worte. Spannungsreich sind ihre Pianissimi, von Akzenten durchzuckt. In einer Illusion des Improvisierten hört man dem allmählichen Verfertigen der Musik beim Spielen zu. Und der große Apparat des Orchesters, die gelegentliche Brillanz der Soli haben dabei nur den Sinn, Palisaden zu ziehen rings um die Gärten dieses Traums.

Das Orchester | 09/2016 | Thomas Bopp | September 1, 2016

Den Interpreten gelingt so ein bis ins kleinste Detail durchdachter Ansatz, der einen frappierend natürlichen Organismus hervorbringt, wo eines aus dem anderen erwächst.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Den Interpreten gelingt so ein bis ins kleinste Detail durchdachter Ansatz, der einen frappierend natürlichen Organismus hervorbringt, wo eines aus dem anderen erwächst.

Fanfare | August 2016 | Jim Svejda | August 1, 2016

The fourth and fifth volumes of Audite’s Schumann series with Heinz Holliger and the West German Radio Symphony are in many ways the mostMehr lesen

The fourth and fifth volumes of Audite’s Schumann series with Heinz Holliger and the West German Radio Symphony are in many ways the most fascinating so far and the toughest sell. The difficulty is obvious from a glance at the repertoire list: one masterpiece, one quasi-masterpiece, and four conspicuous examples of less than top-drawer Schumann.

The version of the Piano Concerto is all we’ve come to expect from this excellent series, including alert, rhythmically flexible playing from a first-class radio orchestra (people who play to microphones for a living), a conductor who knows his business in Schumann (a firm grasp of the long line, an ability to clarify the occasionally dense inner voicing, a total lack of fear when it comes to punching the telling accent, an uncanny knack for pointing out the previously overlooked—but deeply important—detail), together with superbly realistic recorded sound that nonetheless bathes everything in an early-Romantic glow. The young Hungarian pianist Dénes Várjon takes a wonderfully fresh and unaffected approach to this familiar music; while everything feels perfectly controlled, he bends the bar line in a way that recalls the great Schumann pianists of the past (Cortot and Rubinstein especially) but nothing feels willful or self-aggrandizing. If the finale lacks the head-long excitement of Fleisher, Janis, Richter, and others, then overall it’s an immensely satisfying outing that makes you want to hear some of the solo piano music from this source. (There’s already an excellent version of the violin sonatas with Carolin Widmann on ECM 1902 and an even finer recording of the cello music with Steven Isserlis on Hyperion 67661.)

Wild child Patricia Kopatchinskaja’s presence guarantees an immensely individual look at the problematic Violin Concerto, and, as usual, she doesn’t disappoint. From her first entrance, it’s a startlingly original interpretation, with a seemingly endless variety of tone color—insured by her endless types of vibrato—down to that chilling moment in the heart of the first movement where the line is so drained of life it sounds like someone keening at a funeral. (There are other moments where the sound is so intense at the lower range of audibility that you wonder if she heard of Leonard Bernstein’s extraordinary instruction to a string section: “Play triple piano, but use the kind of vibrato you use playing triple forte.”) Holliger adds as much point and thrust as he possibly can to the outer movements—especially the opening movement, which for once never seems to drag—and although the slow movement seems less a premature anticlimax than usual, things never quite add up (as they never quite have, at least on records).

Kopatchinskaja is just as committed and persuasive in the violin Fantasie, whose gypsy-like opening flourishes are a reminder that it was written for the Hungarian-born Joseph Joachim, who actually played the piece (he refused to touch the concerto). Like the late Concert Allegro with Introduction which Schumann began writing only three days after the Fantasie was finished, it’s a work whose thematic inspiration is pretty thin gruel, as is the working out of the basic material. Like Kopatchinskaja, pianist Alexander Lonquich does everything he can to invest his part with life and interest, though well before the Concert Allegro begins you realize why—after a certain point—the composer’s widow stopped playing it in public.

All concerned are on far firmer footing in the earlier Introduction and Allegro appassionato, written well before Schumann was beginning to lose his grip on things. Lonquich responds admirably to the work’s impetuosity and high romance, though not with quite the same magical fusion of freshness and knowing finesse Jan Lisiecki achieves in his recent recording with Antonio Pappano (DG 479 5327).

The orchestra’s horn section turns in a spectacular account of the op. 86 Konzertstück, which still gets recorded far more frequently than it’s actually performed, given that its often stratospheric writing for the first horn is an endless series of clams just waiting to happen. Holliger and the soloists’ colleagues give them rousing support, though the closing bars lack the visceral excitement of Gerard Schwarz and the Seattle Symphony’s madcap dash to the end (Naxos 8.572770).

Collectors of this fine series will have snatched up both installments by now; others can proceed with minimal caution, as anything Kopatchinskaja does these days is mandatory listening.
The fourth and fifth volumes of Audite’s Schumann series with Heinz Holliger and the West German Radio Symphony are in many ways the most

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | July 2016 | Erik Levi | July 1, 2016

Patricia Kopatchinskaja is typically bold and provocative in Schumann's Violin Concerto. Largely eschewing the full-blooded sonorities favoured byMehr lesen

Patricia Kopatchinskaja is typically bold and provocative in Schumann's Violin Concerto. Largely eschewing the full-blooded sonorities favoured by other soloists, she peppers the fiery passagework in the first movement with harsh accents, and produces a dogged and relentless tone in much of the Polonaise Finale. At the opposite end of the dynamic spectrum, lyrical phrases tail off to an almost inaudible whisper, and in the middle section of the first movement the tempo is so stretched that time almost seems to stand still. Some might find her approach too schizophrenic even for a composition that purportedly straddles the borderlines between sanity and madness. Where it works really well is in the slow movement, Kopatchinskaja exposing the fragility of Schumann's writing with heartrending sensitivity.

Heinz Holliger and the WDR Sinfonieorchester are responsive partners both in the Violin Concerto and its far less problematic counterpart for piano. This latter work is presented in a relatively straightforward manner by Dénes Várjon, who emphasises its playfulness and lightness of touch, especially in the slow movement and Finale.

Holliger is particularly good at bringing out light and shade in Schumann's orchestration and highlighting inner details. This clarity of texture is evident throughout the two Konzertstücke for piano Op. 92 and Op. 134, where Holliger matches Alexander Lonquich's muscular tone with powerfully driven orchestral tuttis. The Konzertstücke for four horns, magnificently executed by the orchestra's principals, also benefits from Holliger's insights, the irresistible exuberance of the outer movements contrasting with the mellifluous expressiveness achieved in the central Romanze. Less convincing is the Fantasie for violin and orchestra, composed in the same year as the Violin Concerto but less exalted. Kopatchinskaja shows considerable charismatic imagination in projecting the rustic features of the faster section, but makes a few slips of intonation.
Patricia Kopatchinskaja is typically bold and provocative in Schumann's Violin Concerto. Largely eschewing the full-blooded sonorities favoured by

www.opusklassiek.nl | juni 2016 | Gerard Scheltens | June 1, 2016

Maar het "pièce de résistance" van deze cd is toch het Konzertstück voor vier hoorns, dat door de eigenaardige bezetting niet vaak wordt gespeeld. Maar wat een geweldig stuk ... wat een vrolijkheid... en wat een speelplezier... hier kom je helemaal van bij...Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Maar het "pièce de résistance" van deze cd is toch het Konzertstück voor vier hoorns, dat door de eigenaardige bezetting niet vaak wordt gespeeld. Maar wat een geweldig stuk ... wat een vrolijkheid... en wat een speelplezier... hier kom je helemaal van bij...

Crescendo Magazine
Crescendo Magazine | Le 22 mai 2016 | Ayrton Desimpelaere | May 22, 2016 Fin d’une très belle intégrale Schumann par Heinz Holliger

La baguette de Heinz Holliger est toujours aussi attrayante, presque envoutante tant le chef parvient à faire sortir de l’orchestre une intensité dramatique et une énergie jamais interrompue.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
La baguette de Heinz Holliger est toujours aussi attrayante, presque envoutante tant le chef parvient à faire sortir de l’orchestre une intensité dramatique et une énergie jamais interrompue.

Infodad.com | May 12, 2016 | May 12, 2016 When soloists soar

Having long since proved himself a superior oboist, Heinz Holliger is nowMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Having long since proved himself a superior oboist, Heinz Holliger is now

Gramophone
Gramophone | 03.05.2016 | David Threasher | May 3, 2016

Schumann’s Violin Concerto has one of the strangest histories of all great Romantic works. His last piece for orchestral forces, it was inspired byMehr lesen

Schumann’s Violin Concerto has one of the strangest histories of all great Romantic works. His last piece for orchestral forces, it was inspired by a meeting with the young Joseph Joachim in 1853. ‘May Beethoven’s example incite you, O wondrous guardian of the richest treasures,’ wrote the 22-year-old virtuoso, ‘to carve out a work from your deep quarry and bring something to light for us poor violinists.’

This coincided with a particularly stressful period in Schumann’s personal and professional life, not least the fallout from his deficiencies as a conductor with the Düsseldorf Musikverein. He was plagued by illness; but work on music for Joachim—two sonatas, the Phantasie, Op 131, and the Concerto—invigorated him and he remarked often on his ability to concentrate diligently on the music for his young new fiddler friend.
Joachim never performed the concerto, though. With Schumann’s decline and suicide attempt, the violinist considered the work to be ‘morbid’ and the product of a failing mind; he wrote that it betrayed ‘a certain exhaustion, which attempts to wring out the last resources of spiritual energy’. This attitude evidently rubbed off on Clara and Brahms, who omitted it from the complete edition of Schumann’s works. Joachim retained the manuscript and bequeathed it to the Prussian State Library in Berlin upon his death in 1907, stating in his will that it should be neither played nor published until 1956, 100 years after Schumann’s death.

It was in 1933, however, that it came to light. This is where the story turns very peculiar. The violinist sisters Jelly d’Arányi and Adila Fachiri held a séance in which the shade of Schumann asked that they recover and perform a lost piece of his; then Joachim’s ghost handily popped up to mention that they might look in the Prussian State Library. A copy of the score was sent to Yehudi Menuhin, who pronounced it the ‘missing link’ in the violin literature between Beethoven and Brahms, and announced he would give its premiere in October 1937. D’Arányi claimed precedence on account of Schumann’s imprimatur (albeit from the other side), and the German State invoked their copyright on the work and demanded a German soloist have the honour. Georg Kulenkampff was eventually entrusted with the world premiere; Menuhin introduced it in the US and d’Arányi in the UK.
It’s long been considered a problematic work, owing partly to Joachim’s opinion of it, partly to some supposedly heavy scoring and partly to the awkward gait of the polonaise finale, which can too easily become a graveyard for dogged soloists. Nevertheless, it’s something of a rite of passage for recording violinists, and two of the finest present it on new discs, as Patricia Kopatchinskaja goes head-to-head with Thomas Zehetmair. Kopatchinskaja (with the Cologne WDR SO under Heinz Holliger in Vol 4 of his series of Schumann’s ‘Complete Symphonic Works’) displays the full range of sounds she is able to draw from her instrument, spinning something almost hallucinatory in the slow movement. The tone employed by Zehetmair (directing the Orchestre de Chambre de Paris) is more focused, more centred, as would appear to be his outlook on the work: all three movements are 40 seconds to a minute faster than Kopatchinskaja. Nevertheless, her concentration and imagination sustain the performance, and Holliger and his players follow her lead in creating some wondrous sounds, demonstrating yet again that Schumann’s orchestration isn’t as leaden as it’s often made out to be.

On first hearing, I wasn’t sure if I’d wish to revisit Kopatchinskaja’s disc in a hurry. But there’s something magnetic about her vision of the work, about the abandon with which she plays, never shunning an ugly tone when it’s called for. Zehetmair’s tidier, more dapper performance avoids such ugliness and makes choosing between the two an invidious choice. Holliger couples an energetic performance of the Piano Concerto with Dénes Várjon, incorporating in the first movement some features of the earlier Phantasie on which it was based, and which some might prefer to the self-conciously individual recent readings by Ingrid Fliter (reviewed on page 40) or Stephen Hough (Hyperion, 4/16). Zehetmair offers a lithe, spontaneous Spring Symphony and the fiddle Phantasie that Joachim did play.

Pat Kop also offers this latter work, on Vol 5 of Holliger’s series. Again, she takes a more spacious, more reactive approach than Zehetmair; elsewhere on the disc, Alexander Lonquich is similarly more inclined to let the music breathe in Schumann’s two single-movement concertante piano works than, say, the tauter Jan Lisiecki (DG, 1/16). The real draw here, though, is the Konzertstück for four horns and orchestra, in a performance that makes a truly joyful noise, even if it’s perhaps less sleek than Barenboim in Chicago or less steampunk than John Eliot Gardiner with a quartet of period piston horns.

These days, you’re as likely to find—on disc, at least—the Cello Concerto co-opted by violinists. Jean-Guihen Queyras returns it to the bass clef, though, completing the series of the three concertos and piano trios with Isabelle Faust, Alexander Melnikov and the Freiburg Baroque Orchestra under Pablo Heras-Casado. Queyras gives the best possible case for the concerto, making a virtue of the relative short-windedness of period instruments but exploiting their greater ensemble clarity. Where the gut strings really tell, though, is in the First Piano Trio—especially at those points at which Schumann asks for new sounds, such as in the first-movement development, where he tells the string players to play at the bridge for an eerie, glassy sound. I’ve enjoyed all the discs in this series without necessarily preferring them to certain older (modern-instrument) favourites. The combination of Queyras’s concerto and the wonderful, driven D minor Trio, though, leads me to suspect that this is the most persuasive of the three.
Schumann’s Violin Concerto has one of the strangest histories of all great Romantic works. His last piece for orchestral forces, it was inspired by

ClicMag
ClicMag | N° 38 Mai 2016 | Pascal Edeline | May 1, 2016

Une fois de plus, Holliger concilie l'aspect réfléchi, apollinien, de la lisibilité des lignes et l'aspect dionysiaque de la ferveur, de l'effusion lyrique émanant comme une voix unanime des solistes et de l'orchestre, mais sa direction solaire magnifiant le contraste et la clarté pourrait laisser de marbre les nostalgiques des timbres fondus, des legato sinueux, des élans remontant des profondeurs obscures, des tensions intériorisées, des paysages nimbés de mystère. Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Une fois de plus, Holliger concilie l'aspect réfléchi, apollinien, de la lisibilité des lignes et l'aspect dionysiaque de la ferveur, de l'effusion lyrique émanant comme une voix unanime des solistes et de l'orchestre, mais sa direction solaire magnifiant le contraste et la clarté pourrait laisser de marbre les nostalgiques des timbres fondus, des legato sinueux, des élans remontant des profondeurs obscures, des tensions intériorisées, des paysages nimbés de mystère.

Thüringen Kulturspiegel
Thüringen Kulturspiegel | Mai 2016 | Dr. Eberhard Kneipel | May 1, 2016 AIte Schönheit - neuer Glanz
Die Gesamtaufnahme von Robert Schumanns Orchesterwerken beim Edel-Label audite

Erster Anlauf, erstaunliche Experimente, imponierende Meisterwerke: Ein außergewöhnliches und an Entdeckungen reiches Hör-Erlebnis ist zu haben – auch dank audite!Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Erster Anlauf, erstaunliche Experimente, imponierende Meisterwerke: Ein außergewöhnliches und an Entdeckungen reiches Hör-Erlebnis ist zu haben – auch dank audite!

Der neue Merker
Der neue Merker | 26. April 2016 | Dr. Ingobert Waltenberger | April 26, 2016

Alexander Lonquich am Flügel bringt genau jenen melancholisch-jubelnden Ton, jenes fantastische Fabulieren voller zarter Farben ein, „polarisierend zwischen Trotz und Melancholie auf der einen, Traum und Sehnsucht auf der anderen Seite.“ Heinz Holliger als Seele des Unterfangens ist ein idealer Dirigent und Begleiter, der sich dem Schumann‘schen Kosmos beeindruckend anverwandt hat.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Alexander Lonquich am Flügel bringt genau jenen melancholisch-jubelnden Ton, jenes fantastische Fabulieren voller zarter Farben ein, „polarisierend zwischen Trotz und Melancholie auf der einen, Traum und Sehnsucht auf der anderen Seite.“ Heinz Holliger als Seele des Unterfangens ist ein idealer Dirigent und Begleiter, der sich dem Schumann‘schen Kosmos beeindruckend anverwandt hat.

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | April 2016 | Michael Kube | April 1, 2016

Nach fast anderthalb Jahren setzt das Label audite seinen Schumann-Zyklus mit einer Doppelfolge fort. Aufgrund der Besetzung und der Werke fraglos einMehr lesen

Nach fast anderthalb Jahren setzt das Label audite seinen Schumann-Zyklus mit einer Doppelfolge fort. Aufgrund der Besetzung und der Werke fraglos ein Kraftakt für alle Beteiligten – doch mit einer anhaltenden Poesie verbunden, die einem Schumann, seine vielfach als problematisch eingeredete Instrumentation und sein Spätwerk näher als zuvor erscheinen lassen. War dies schon bei den Sinfonien und dem Cellokonzert zu erfahren, die Heinz Holliger ohne die seit über einem Jahrhundert gepflegten aufführungspraktischen Retuschen mühelos zu verblüffender Lebendigkeit erweckt hat, so stellen er und das WDR-Sinfonieorchester sich nun in den Dienst der übrigen konzertanten Werke.

Wie so oft erweist sich alles nur als eine Frage der Interpretation – von der Verständigkeit gegenüber dem Notentext über das aufmerksame Zusammenwirken bis hin zur passgenauen Artikulation und das rechte Tempo. In diesem Sinne gelingt es Holliger und seinen Solisten mit den Konzertstücken für Klavier op. 92 und op. 134 (Alexander Lonquich) sowie der Violin-Fantasie op. 131 tatsächlich zu überzeugen: Man hört einen Komponisten, dem das virtuose Element eigentümlich fremd und doch so nah war, dem am Ende aber der poetische Gedanke mehr zählte als jede leere Phrase. Hier begegnen sich über mehr als 150 Jahre hinweg die Komponisten Schumann und Holliger auf ästhetischer Ebene – der Dirigent Holliger aber weiß, wie auch der rechte Tonfall in einer klanglich agilen, in nahezu jedem Moment die Aufmerksamkeit bannenden Aufnahme festzuhalten ist. Umso mehr muss der stark aufgeraute, bisweilen kantige Zugriff von Patricia Kopatchinskaja im Violinkonzert verstören, der nicht gerade vor wohliger Wärme sprüht; das kühle Solo des langsamen Satzes lehrt einen gar das Frösteln. Daneben vermag Dénes Várjon im delikat angegangenen Klavierkonzert mit seinem eher vorsichtigen, keineswegs griffigen Forte nicht vollständig zu überzeugen.
Nach fast anderthalb Jahren setzt das Label audite seinen Schumann-Zyklus mit einer Doppelfolge fort. Aufgrund der Besetzung und der Werke fraglos ein

Musica | N° 275 - aprile 2016 | Giuseppe Rossi | April 1, 2016

Un rinnovato interesse per le opere orchestrali di Robert Schumann ha vistoMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Un rinnovato interesse per le opere orchestrali di Robert Schumann ha visto

Record Geijutsu
Record Geijutsu | APR. 2016 | April 1, 2016

Japanische Rezension siehe PDF!Mehr lesen

Japanische Rezension siehe PDF!
Japanische Rezension siehe PDF!

Stuttgarter Zeitung
Stuttgarter Zeitung | 22.03.2016 | Dr. Uwe Schweikert | March 22, 2016 Eine Großtat für Robert Schumann
Heinz Holliger und das WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln nehmen das gesamte sinfonische Werk auf

Man sagt wohl nicht zu viel, wenn man diese CDs als die wichtigste Schumann-Einspielung seit langem rühmt. Sie beweist, dass es keines historischen Instrumentariums und auch keines Spezialistenensembles bedarf, um die Werke aus dem Geist der Zeit für heute aufs Neue zu verlebendigen.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Man sagt wohl nicht zu viel, wenn man diese CDs als die wichtigste Schumann-Einspielung seit langem rühmt. Sie beweist, dass es keines historischen Instrumentariums und auch keines Spezialistenensembles bedarf, um die Werke aus dem Geist der Zeit für heute aufs Neue zu verlebendigen.

The Guardian
The Guardian | Thursday 17 March 2016 | Andrew Clements | March 17, 2016 Schumann: Konzertstücke; Fantasies
CD review – questing and luxuriant

The work for four horns stands out, if only for the novelty of its scoring, and Holliger’s performance – with a fabulously secure quartet of soloists – luxuriates in the sonorities it generates, while in the two works with piano, the soloist Alexander Lonquich finds moments of poetic beauty in the lyrical interludes. Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The work for four horns stands out, if only for the novelty of its scoring, and Holliger’s performance – with a fabulously secure quartet of soloists – luxuriates in the sonorities it generates, while in the two works with piano, the soloist Alexander Lonquich finds moments of poetic beauty in the lyrical interludes.

Musik & Theater | 03/04 März/April 2016 | Reinmar Wagner | March 1, 2016 Feuerwerk an Ideen

[...] wenn Patricia Kopatchinskaja mit dabei ist, dann erhält die Bezeichnung Fantasie erst ihre wahre Bedeutung: Ein Feuerwerk an Ideen – manche spektakulär, manche nur Nuancen – lebendig, rhythmisch aufsässig präsentiert oder in lässiger Nonchalance gibt dieser Musik improvisatorischen Charakter.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
[...] wenn Patricia Kopatchinskaja mit dabei ist, dann erhält die Bezeichnung Fantasie erst ihre wahre Bedeutung: Ein Feuerwerk an Ideen – manche spektakulär, manche nur Nuancen – lebendig, rhythmisch aufsässig präsentiert oder in lässiger Nonchalance gibt dieser Musik improvisatorischen Charakter.

Vorarlberger Nachrichten | 19. Februar 2016 | Fritz Jurmann | February 19, 2016 MusikTipps von Fritz Jurmann

[...] auch hier setzt [Kopatchinskaja] in [Schumanns] späten, oft verkannten Violinkonzert d-Moll mit vibratoarmem Spiel und leeren Saiten deutliche Akzente. Experimentelle Züge dienen der Künstlerin als Leitbild für ihre stark individuelle Lesart jenseits aller klischeehaft romantisierten Hörgewohnheiten. Desgleichen verfährt sie mit seiner Fantasie für Violine, die ihrer ungezügelten Spielweise besonders entgegenkommt.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
[...] auch hier setzt [Kopatchinskaja] in [Schumanns] späten, oft verkannten Violinkonzert d-Moll mit vibratoarmem Spiel und leeren Saiten deutliche Akzente. Experimentelle Züge dienen der Künstlerin als Leitbild für ihre stark individuelle Lesart jenseits aller klischeehaft romantisierten Hörgewohnheiten. Desgleichen verfährt sie mit seiner Fantasie für Violine, die ihrer ungezügelten Spielweise besonders entgegenkommt.

Rondo
Rondo | Nr. 936 // 16. - 22.04.2016 | Guido Fischer | February 19, 2016

Ins hymnische Land der Schwärmerei lädt [...] das Konzertstück für vier Hörner ein – dank der vier Bravour-Hornisten des WDR Sinfonieorchesters Köln.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ins hymnische Land der Schwärmerei lädt [...] das Konzertstück für vier Hörner ein – dank der vier Bravour-Hornisten des WDR Sinfonieorchesters Köln.

www.ilcorrieremusicale.it | 18 febbraio 2016 | Stefano Cascioli | February 18, 2016

Senza dubbio è un Cd piuttosto singolare, che, vista la proposta di brani ben poco conosciuti, ha i tratti delle incisioni “di riempimento” (necessarie in ogni integrale che si rispetti), ma non per questo è una proposta meno interessante, anzi gli accostamenti sono davvero suggestivi, e chiariscono ancor meglio alcune peculiarità del complesso pensiero schumanniano.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Senza dubbio è un Cd piuttosto singolare, che, vista la proposta di brani ben poco conosciuti, ha i tratti delle incisioni “di riempimento” (necessarie in ogni integrale che si rispetti), ma non per questo è una proposta meno interessante, anzi gli accostamenti sono davvero suggestivi, e chiariscono ancor meglio alcune peculiarità del complesso pensiero schumanniano.

www.pizzicato.lu | 11/02/2016 | Alain Steffen | February 11, 2016 Holligers moderner Schumann

Ich habe mit Heinz Holliger als Dirigent nicht selten meine Schwierigkeiten. Gerade im romantischen Repertoire ist er mir oft zu kühl und zuMehr lesen

Ich habe mit Heinz Holliger als Dirigent nicht selten meine Schwierigkeiten. Gerade im romantischen Repertoire ist er mir oft zu kühl und zu analytisch. Seine Schumann-Aufnahmen bei Audite sind aber sehr gut gelungen. Im Vol. IV stehen das Violinkonzert und das Klavierkonzert auf dem Programm. Insbesondere das Violinkonzert mit Patricia Kopatchinskaya wird zu einem Erlebnis. Mit zügigen Tempi und einer herrlichen Phrasierungskunst überzeugt die Violinistin auf der ganzen Linie und macht aus dem schwarzen Schaf der Violinliteratur einen echten Renner.

Wie schon Isabelle Faust räumt auch Kopatchinskaya mit den Klischees auf und zeigt uns Schumanns Musik in einem sehr frischen und dynamischen Gewand. Holliger dirigiert erstaunlich musikantisch, verzichtet aber wie gewohnt auf zu starke romantische Exkurse. So stehen vor allem ein aktzentreiches und klares Musizieren im Vordergrund.
Mit dem gleichen Konzept geht Holliger auch das beliebte Klavierkonzert an. Genussvoll lässt er das hervorragend disponierte WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln aufspielen, sieht aber seinen Schumann auch hier durch eine strengere klassischere Brille. Was der Musik aber sehr gut tut. Dénes Varjon spielt das Konzert sehr virtuos und mit einer sehr deutlichen Artikulation. Ob man jetzt dieses eher unromantische Interpretationskonzept mag oder lieber die Werke in der klassischen Optik sieht sei einem jeden überlassen. Für mich jedenfalls kommt das Violinkonzert in der Interpretation Kopatchinskaya/Holliger sehr nahe an das Referenzniveau heran.

Vol V. präsentiert etwas weniger attraktive Werke. Hier sticht insbesondere das Konzertstück für vier Hörner ins Auge. Holliger und seine Solisten wollen von Jägerromantik nichts wissen und spielen das Stück äußerst präzise und klar. Der Wohlklang der Hörner ist zwar präsent, ist aber mehr das Resultat einer analytischen und architektonisch begründeten Interpretation als das einer rein atmosphärisch orientierten. Alexander Lonquich spielt die beiden Konzertstücke für Klavier und Orchester op. 92 & 114 mit schönem Ton und ausgewogenem Ausdruck, Kopatchinskaya ist in der Fantasie für Violine und Orchester wieder einmal überragend. Heinz Holliger kann diesen drei Werken deutlich weniger interessante Aspekte abgewinnen als dem Violinkonzert oder dem Klavierkonzert.

Heinz Holliger continues to explore Schumann’s symphonic works in a very clear and analytical way. The highlight of the CDs is the very fresh and vivid performance of the Violin Concerto.
Ich habe mit Heinz Holliger als Dirigent nicht selten meine Schwierigkeiten. Gerade im romantischen Repertoire ist er mir oft zu kühl und zu

Merchant Infos

Robert Schumann: Complete Symphonic Works, Vol. V
article number: 97.718
EAN barcode: 4022143977182
price group: BCA
release date: 18. March 2016
total time: 67 min.

News

date /
Typ
title
Rating
Jan 10, 2018
Info

Qobuz campaign
Jun 14, 2016
Award

Performance 4/5 - Robert Schumann: Complete Symphonic Works, Vol. V
Feb 6, 2016
Award

Son: 10 Livret: 10 Répertoire: 10 Interpretation: 10 - Robert Schumann: Complete Symphonic Works, Vol. V
Apr 20, 2016
Award

Rondo - 5/5 - Robert Schumann: Complete Symphonic Works, Vol. V
Mar 29, 2016
Award

4/5 Sterne - Robert Schumann: Complete Symphonic Works, Vol. V
Mar 14, 2016
Award

Empfehlung des Monats _ ROT - Robert Schumann: Complete Symphonic Works, Vol. V
Nov 2, 2016
Award

4/5 Noten - Robert Schumann: Complete Symphonic Works, Vol. V
May 15, 2017
Review

Das Orchester
Über Schumanns d-Moll-Violinkonzert, das der Komponist 1853 wenige Monate vor...
Mar 15, 2017
Review

Correspondenz Robert Schumann Gesellschaft
Die fünfte und vorletzte Folge von Heinz Holligers Aufnahmen sämtlicher...
Jan 23, 2017
Review

Stuttgarter Zeitung
Eine Großtat für Robert Schumann
Jul 12, 2016
Review

Stereo
Kritiker-Umfrage: Die zehn besten CDs 2016
Sep 27, 2016
Review

Thüringen Kulturspiegel
AIte Schönheit - neuer Glanz
Sep 21, 2016
Review

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Redet diese Musik, träumt sie?
Sep 14, 2016
Review

Fanfare
The fourth and fifth volumes of Audite’s Schumann series with Heinz Holliger...
Jul 9, 2016
Review

Record Geijutsu
Japanische Rezension siehe PDF!...
Jun 15, 2016
Review

Infodad.com
When soloists soar
Jun 15, 2016
Review

Gramophone
Schumann’s Violin Concerto has one of the strangest histories of all great...
Jun 14, 2016
Review

BBC Music Magazine
Patricia Kopatchinskaja is typically bold and provocative in Schumann's Violin...
Aug 6, 2016
Review

www.opusklassiek.nl
Bij deel IV van Holligers' complete Schumann was de magnetische Patricia...
Feb 6, 2016
Review

Crescendo Magazine
Fin d’une très belle intégrale Schumann par Heinz Holliger
May 25, 2016
Review

Der neue Merker
Robert Schumann hat Hochkonjunktur, gemeinsam mit Brahms ist er aktuell ein...
May 24, 2016
Review

ClicMag
La fluidité de la phrase et le raffinement sonore situent le Konzertstück op....
Apr 20, 2016
Review

Rondo
Im Rahmen der Gesamteinspielung der Orchesterwerke von Robert Schumann stehen...
Mar 29, 2016
Review

The Guardian
Schumann: Konzertstücke; Fantasies
Mar 29, 2016
Review

Musica
Un rinnovato interesse per le opere orchestrali di Robert Schumann ha visto...
Mar 14, 2016
Review

Fono Forum
Nach fast anderthalb Jahren setzt das Label audite seinen Schumann-Zyklus mit...
Jan 3, 2016
Review

Musik & Theater
Feuerwerk an Ideen
Feb 24, 2016
Review

www.ilcorrieremusicale.it
Il quinto volume del corpus sinfonico di Schumann che Heinz Holliger e la WDR...
Feb 22, 2016
Review

Vorarlberger Nachrichten
MusikTipps von Fritz Jurmann
Nov 2, 2016
Review

www.pizzicato.lu
Holligers moderner Schumann

More from Robert Schumann

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...