Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Works for Solo Violin: Bartók - Prokofiev - Ysaÿe

97758 - Works for Solo Violin: Bartók - Prokofiev - Ysaÿe

aud 97.758
please choose the quality
%: list price EUR 19.99 >> you save EUR 4.00!
Auto-Rip:
When you complete a purchase of a physical album (including CDs, vinyl and other formats), a free MP3 version of that album is added to your basket.
Special Discount Price!
Free download available for this album.
free download

Béla Bartók’s Sonata for Solo Violin and Eugène Ysaÿe’s Sonatas Op. 27 are the most significant works for solo violin after JS Bach. Both Bartók and Ysaÿe continually refer back to the great model whilst preserving their originality. Prokofiev wrote his Solo Sonata Op. 115 for ambitious violin students; short and crisp, with class and spirit.more

Béla Bartók | Sergei Prokofiev | Eugène Ysaÿe

"Ihre [Franziska Pietschs] aktuelle CD zeugt von stilistischer Treffsicherheit und manueller Brillanz." (Spiegel Online)

Track List

Please choose the preferred audio format:
Stereo
Surround
Quality

Béla Bartók Sonata for Solo Violin, Sz 117 (29:55) Franziska Pietsch

Sergei Prokofiev Violin Sonata in D Major, Op. 115 (12:50) Franziska Pietsch

Eugène Ysaÿe Sonata for Solo Violin No. 2, Op. 27/2 (14:01) Franziska Pietsch

Eugène Ysaÿe Sonata for Solo Violin No. 3, Op. 27/3 (07:25) Franziska Pietsch

Informationen

Landmarks for Solo Violin

Franziska Pietsch's recent recording of the Prokofiev Violin Concertos with large-scale orchestra is followed seemingly by the opposite: works for solo violin. What appears, at first sight, to be a contrast is in fact a logical continuation of her extensive discography, even an enhancement: whilst in her previous releases, Pietsch demonstrated her expressive range and intensive approach both as a brilliant soloist and as an eloquent chamber musician, she now faces the greatest possible reduction, namely a solo recital. This limitation demands incredible presence, power and intensity, for which Franziska Pietsch is predestined. From isolation, she draws depth and grounding; "less" becomes "more"; soleness transforms into greatness.

For her solo recital, she has put together an individual choice of compositions which have accompanied her from an early age and which, for her, represent significant personal and artistic experiences. Prokofiev, to whose works she feels a particular affinity, is also featured here.

Once again, Franziska Pietsch displays a compelling combination of technique and interpretation: her irrepressible creative force penetrates all technical challenges, never losing sight of her interpretation, every note forming part of her reading - a deeply personal recording of the solo sonatas by Bartók, Ysaÿe and Prokofiev.

Bartók's solo sonata, written for Yehudi Menuhin in 1944, and the six sonatas Op. 27 by Ysaÿe are amongst the most prominent twentieth century compositions for violin. Bach, the great paragon, is present in all these works. From Ysaÿe's cycle, Pietsch has chosen the particularly striking Sonatas Nos 2 and 3 which are dedicated respectively to the violinists Jacques Thibaud and George Enescu. As an "encore" she plays the solo sonata Op. 115 by Sergei Prokofiev which had been intended for ambitions violin students. Transcending its original purpose, however, this compact work is a small stroke of genius.

Forthcoming recording projects featuring Franziska Pietsch include the violin sonatas by Shostakovich and Strauss (pianist: Josu de Solaun) as well as string trios by Schnittke, Penderecki and Weinberg (Trio Lirico).

Reviews

Süddeutsche Zeitung
Süddeutsche Zeitung | Magazin Heft 26/2019 27. Juni 2019 | Carolin Pirich | June 27, 2019 GEGEN DEN STRICH
Als sie jung war, blockierte die DDR ihre Karriere. Jetzt stößt sie an die Grenzen der Musikbranche. Aber Grenzen sind ihre Spezialität: die erstaunliche Geschichte der Ausnahmegeigerin Franziska Pietsch

Sie fragt: Vielleicht möchten Sie mich in Aktion sehen? Man hätte dannMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Sie fragt: Vielleicht möchten Sie mich in Aktion sehen? Man hätte dann

Fanfare | April 2019 | Huntley Dent | April 10, 2019

The blurb for this new recital from the estimable German violinist Franziska Pietsch says that the solo violin sonatas by Bartók and Ysaÿe were theMehr lesen

The blurb for this new recital from the estimable German violinist Franziska Pietsch says that the solo violin sonatas by Bartók and Ysaÿe were the most important works in the genre since Bach. No one would seriously dispute this claim, I imagine, but the two composers worked at different levels, Bartók consciously writing with the serious concentration of Bach, Ysaÿe in the tradition of brilliant virtuosity exemplified by the Paganini Caprices. Pietsch was probably wise to separate them with the easy-going, accessible Prokofiev Solo Sonata, because Bartók created an intense, thorny piece that often assaults the ear aggressively; you need to decompress before enjoying the three-ring circus presented by Ysaÿe, which isn’t to deny the charm and musicality that’s also present.

The first recording of the Bartók to come my way as a reviewer (in Fanfare 38:3) was by the superb Hungarian violinist Barnabás Kelemen on Hungaroton. He captures every facet of a rich, dense, extremely varied score. Comparing the piece with the two violin-and-piano sonatas, I wrote, “Perhaps the most difficult is the Sonata for Solo Violin commissioned by Yehudi Menuhin in 1944. The dying Bartók set himself the challenge of updating Bach in an uncompromising modernist idiom. The entry point here is formal, because we get a Bach-like Chaconne and Fuga in the first two movements, followed by a slow Melodia and a virtuosic Presto finale.”

Some performers, notably Christian Tetzlaff, smooth out the sonata’s aggressiveness, while others, like Vilde Frang, go for broke. Either way, the listener has to brace himself. Bartók employs the violin’s capacity to scrape, scratch, and wail more often than its capacity for song. Pietsch vies with Frang’s take-no-prisoners approach, underlining the work’s tonal extremes to an abrasive degree, risking more screech and scratch than I am comfortable with. Musically, however, she lacks Tetzlaff’s wonderful ability to give us a sense of wholeness in Bartók’s conception—the music shouldn’t be all noise and chaos. I also admire how Tetzlaff adds warmth to the lyric passages that crop up here and there, so despite her obvious skill and commitment, Pietsch’s reading wouldn’t be among my top choices. It should appeal, however, to anyone who wants an explosive performance of an astonishing work.

I admired Pietsch’s recording of the two Prokofiev Violin Concertos and the two sonatas with piano. She’s equally sympathetic in his late Solo Violin Sonata in D from 1947. By then Prokofiev’s inspiration was declining along with his health, but the solo sonata is agreeably tuneful, nimble, and upbeat. The work was commissioned by the Soviet music system as a teaching piece, so it is not technically very difficult. It was originally designed to be played by an ensemble of talented students rather than as a solo work. Pietsch’s reading is less pointed and intense than, say, Viktoria Mullova’s (Onyx), but it doesn’t suffer by comparison, being lyrical and appealing in its own right.

Ysaÿe’s Six Solo Violin Sonatas, gathered as his op. 27 in 1923, are beloved by virtuosos, giving them scope for brilliance and Romanticism to the utmost. In the second sonata of the group, dedicated to Jacques Thibaud, the “obsession” of the subtitle refers to Thibaud’s love of Bach and his habit of including the opening Preludio of Partita No. 3 in his morning practice sessions. Just as obsessive, however, is the contrasting use of the Gregorian Dies irae that captured the ear of many composers, most notably Liszt and Rachmaninoff. The juxtaposition of the two borrowings is incongruous but quite entertaining.

In the last issue Robert Maxham was enthusiastic about a performance from Maïté Louis (Continuo), who highlights the stark contrasts in Ysaÿe’s quotations. She maintains a beautiful, consistent tone as well and focuses on Romantic expression to an enticing degree. I’d say that Pietsch goes one better in expressing both the moods and contrasts in the piece. She has an air of personal involvement that’s captivating. The combination of excitement and presence makes this a memorable reading in all four movements, whether Ysaÿe is being misterioso or theatrical.

The program ends with Ysaÿe’s Sonata No. 3, “Ballade,” dedicated to Georges Enescu. Its single movement is in two sections, the first being lyrical and passionate, with almost continuous double- and triple-stops, the second, marked con bravura, moving into brilliant passagework without letting up on the double-stops. Pietsch gives an account as charismatic and captivating as in the previous sonata, which makes the Ysaÿe portion of the disc very compelling.

There’s always something of absorbing value in every release I’ve heard from this artist, and even if Pietsch’s Bartók frayed my nerves, that’s a personal reaction. On every other count this disc, which has excellent recorded sound, is strongly recommended.
The blurb for this new recital from the estimable German violinist Franziska Pietsch says that the solo violin sonatas by Bartók and Ysaÿe were the

Das Orchester | 4/2019 | Stefan Drees | April 1, 2019 | source: https://dasorche...

Die Orientierung an Formensprache und Ausdrucksvielfalt von JohannMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Orientierung an Formensprache und Ausdrucksvielfalt von Johann

www.qobuz.com | 18.03.2019 | SM | March 18, 2019 | source: https://www.qobu...

Wer meint, dass die Solovioline des 20. Jahrhunderts etwas schwierig anzuhören ist, sollte sich die feurigen und klangvollen Interpretationen von Pietsch anhören: ein ganzes Orchester auf einer einzigen Geige.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Wer meint, dass die Solovioline des 20. Jahrhunderts etwas schwierig anzuhören ist, sollte sich die feurigen und klangvollen Interpretationen von Pietsch anhören: ein ganzes Orchester auf einer einzigen Geige.

American Record Guide | March/April 2019 | MAGIL | March 1, 2019

This is the fourth recording by German violinist Franziska Pietsch that I have had the pleasure to review. The earlier ones were the Grieg ViolinMehr lesen

This is the fourth recording by German violinist Franziska Pietsch that I have had the pleasure to review. The earlier ones were the Grieg Violin Sonatas (J/F 2016), the Franck Violin Sonata and Szymanowski’s Myths and Romance (S/O 2017), and the Prokofieff Violin Sonatas and Five Melodies (N/D 2016). In those, she showed that she is a charismatic performer with her own ideas about the music. She doesn’t just regurgitate the interpretations fed to her by her teachers. I noticed her enchanting way with passages at low dynamic levels and was bowled over by her superb Prokofieff disc, so I was very excited to get this disc to review when I noticed the Prokofieff Solo Violin Sonata in the program. This sonata, the Bartok Solo Violin Sonata, and the Six Solo Violin Sonatas by Eugene Ysaye are, I believe, the finest works in that genre produced since 1900 (sorry, Reger and Hindemith).

My excitement turned to disappointment when I listened. I noticed that she wasn’t able to sustain the long lines of the Franck Sonata, and here she fails to elucidate the architecture of the Bartok. It is a very classical work in its emphasis on form, and she doesn’t make the work’s structure her first priority, opting instead to use varying tone colors in an attempt to give the piece episodic interest. This does not do the piece justice, in spite of the fact that Bartok was a great colorist, especially in his writing for strings. It fragments the work. Robert Mann’s recording (J/A 2003) is the most effective at making the form of the piece plain, and Pietsch and everyone else would do well to listen to it. On top of this, she decided not to play Bartok’s original quarter tones in the finale, which I believe ruins the buzzing house fly-like character of those passages.

I was surprised to hear Pietsch failing to bring out the simple lyricism of the Prokofieff. Again, her interpretation is episodic and fails to knit these three brief movements together. I expected that she would finally feel sympathy for the two Ysaye sonatas; they are the most volatile and episodic works here and demand a broad range of moods and colors from the performer. Again, she is more interested in surface effects than in getting to the heart of the music, especially in the deeply felt Sonata 2, which is a character portrait of the great French violinist Jacques Thibaud.

These are the weakest performances I have heard from her. She relies on her personality instead of her intellect to sustain the music, but it can’t. Great music must be met on its own terms and cannot be reduced to a medium for the display of virtuosity and temperament. I had always found Pietsch’s manner very appealing, but it hinders rather than helps these performances. The violin was made in 1751 by the Milanese violin maker Carlo Antonio Testore.
This is the fourth recording by German violinist Franziska Pietsch that I have had the pleasure to review. The earlier ones were the Grieg Violin

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | Februar 2019 | Martin Demmler | February 1, 2019

Es ist mutig, ein Album ausschließlich mit Sonaten für Violine solo vorzulegen, stehen diese Werke doch zumeist ein wenig im Schatten derMehr lesen

Es ist mutig, ein Album ausschließlich mit Sonaten für Violine solo vorzulegen, stehen diese Werke doch zumeist ein wenig im Schatten der klangvolleren Arbeiten für Violine und Klavier. Doch wenn diese Solosonaten so engagiert und ausdrucksstark vorgetragen werden wie hier von Franziska Pietsch, dann hat sich dieser Mut gelohnt. Pietsch, die noch in der DDR als Wunderkind Karriere machte und seitdem vorwiegend als Konzertmeisterin und Solistin arbeitet, konzentriert sich dabei auf Arbeiten der Spätromantik und der frühen Moderne.

Béla Bartóks Sonate für Violine solo gehört unbestritten zu den größten Meisterwerken der Literatur für dieses Instrument. Entstanden 1944 im New Yorker Exil für Yehudi Menuhin, verweist das Werk bereits in seiner Anlage mit einer großen Chaconne als Kopfsatz, gefolgt von einer Fuge, auf die Sonaten für Solo-Violine Johann Sebastian Bachs. Im ersten Satz wirkt die Interpretation Pietschs sehr expressiv, mitunter sogar aggressiv und mit großen dynamischen Kontrasten. Dabei gelingen ihr vor allem die polyfonen Passagen äußerst eindrucksvoll, während die lyrischen Abschnitte manchmal etwas unterkühlt wirken. Kraftvoll und emotional packend dagegen ihre Version der Fuge, zart und einfühlsam das zentrale liedhaft-melancholische Adagio.

Ohne diese Bedeutungstiefe kommt die Solosonate von Sergej Prokofjew daher. Das liegt vermutlich daran, dass sie ursprünglich als Übungsstück für Geigenstudenten gedacht war. Es ist ein heiteres, unkompliziertes Werk. Man hört Franziska Pietsch die Freude an, mit der sie sich dieser Musik annimmt. Da wird jede melodische Phrase ausgekostet, jeder kompositorische Einfall zelebriert. Sätze aus den Solo-Sonaten Eugène Ysaÿes sind heute meist nur noch als Zugaben zu hören. Dass sich eine intensivere Beschäftigung mit diesen Werken lohnt, stellt Pietsch hier eindrucksvoll unter Beweis.
Es ist mutig, ein Album ausschließlich mit Sonaten für Violine solo vorzulegen, stehen diese Werke doch zumeist ein wenig im Schatten der

http://klassiker.welt.de | 20. Dezember 2018 | Manuel Brug | December 20, 2018 | source: http://klassiker... Brugs Beste: Nummer 20 – Franziska Pietsch gibt allein ihrer Geige eine starke, reife, ungefügte Stimme

Das Salonhafte, Schillernde und das trotzig sich Aufbäumende, Franziska Pietsch beherrscht beides, letzteres scheint ihr näher. Sie traut sich das und hält es mit emotionaler Kraft durch. Musik als Gefäß der Wahrheit, in das sie ihr Sein gießt, ehrlich, ohne Manier, direkt, aufmerksam. Die Unmittelbarkeit ihre Gesten springt einen förmlich an.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Salonhafte, Schillernde und das trotzig sich Aufbäumende, Franziska Pietsch beherrscht beides, letzteres scheint ihr näher. Sie traut sich das und hält es mit emotionaler Kraft durch. Musik als Gefäß der Wahrheit, in das sie ihr Sein gießt, ehrlich, ohne Manier, direkt, aufmerksam. Die Unmittelbarkeit ihre Gesten springt einen förmlich an.

WDR 3
WDR 3 | TonArt | 10.12.2018 | Wibke Gerking | December 10, 2018 | source: https://www1.wdr... BROADCAST

Die Solosonate von Béla Bartók scheint Franziska Pietsch wie auf den Leib geschrieben. Wenn sie spielt, scheint ihre ganze Seele in der Musik zu liegen. Es ist eine radikale, extreme Interpretation, die sich eine künstlerische Freiheit nimmt, die auf einer tiefen Durchdringung des Werks beruht. [...] Franziska Pietsch ist eine intensive Geigerpersönlichkeit; entsprechend intensiv ist das Musikerlebnis.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Solosonate von Béla Bartók scheint Franziska Pietsch wie auf den Leib geschrieben. Wenn sie spielt, scheint ihre ganze Seele in der Musik zu liegen. Es ist eine radikale, extreme Interpretation, die sich eine künstlerische Freiheit nimmt, die auf einer tiefen Durchdringung des Werks beruht. [...] Franziska Pietsch ist eine intensive Geigerpersönlichkeit; entsprechend intensiv ist das Musikerlebnis.

www.pizzicato.lu | 06/12/2018 | Uwe Krusch | December 6, 2018 | source: https://www.pizz... Auch beim Solorepertoire wieder überzeugend

Wann immer Franziska Pietsch eine neue CD vorlegt, sei es als Solistin mit Orchester, mit ihren Streicherkolleginnen im ‘Trio Lirico’, bei SonatenMehr lesen

Wann immer Franziska Pietsch eine neue CD vorlegt, sei es als Solistin mit Orchester, mit ihren Streicherkolleginnen im ‘Trio Lirico’, bei Sonaten mit Pianist oder wie jetzt wieder als Solistin mit Werken für die Violine allein, darf man sicher sein, dass sie wieder eine beeindruckende Aufnahme zustande bringt. Und das drückt sich dann auch in immer sehr guten Bewertungen aus. Zu dem erfolgreichen Abschneiden trägt natürlich auch das Label Audite mit technisch hochwertig aufbereiteten Einspielungen bei.

Die Geigerin, deren Lebenslauf einen Bruch durch die politischen und dadurch ausgelösten familiären Umstände in der DDR hat, nimmt sich die Solowerke der beiden Komponisten in der Nachfolge der Kompositionen für die Violine solo von Johann Sebastian Bach vor, also Bartok und Ysaÿe. Als Brücke zwischen beiden Komponisten hat sie die Solosonate von Sergei Prokofiev gesetzt.

Wiederum findet sie auf der Basis ihrer technischen Meisterschaft einen persönlichen, die emotionalen Tiefen der jeweiligen Kompositionen auslotenden Zugang. Man mag vermuten, dass die erzwungene Unterbrechung der Entwicklung in der Jugend anfänglich ein Schock war, dass sich aber aus dieser Zeit der Besinnung eine besondere Sicht auf die Welt, vor allem die der Musik ergeben hat, die darauf Einfluss hat, dass ihre Interpretationen virtuoses Äußeres beiseiteschieben und sich ganz dem Zugang zur Musik widmen.
Violinist Franziska Pietsch’s account of solo works by Bartok, Ysaÿe, and Prokofiev is technically masterful, and very personal in its emotional depth.
Wann immer Franziska Pietsch eine neue CD vorlegt, sei es als Solistin mit Orchester, mit ihren Streicherkolleginnen im ‘Trio Lirico’, bei Sonaten

Spiegel online | Sonntag, 02.12.2018 | Werner Theurich | December 2, 2018 | source: http://www.spieg... Violinen: Bartók würde sich wundern
Gegen die Konventionen und voller Gegensätze: Die Violinistinnen Franziska Pietsch und Vilde Frang widmen sich virtuos der Musik von Béla Bartók

Ihre [Franziska Pietschs] aktuelle CD zeugt von stilistischer Treffsicherheit und manueller Brillanz.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ihre [Franziska Pietschs] aktuelle CD zeugt von stilistischer Treffsicherheit und manueller Brillanz.

Gramophone
Gramophone | December 2018 | Rob Cowan | December 1, 2018

Franziska Pietsch truly takes ownership of Bartók’s Solo Sonata. Her interpretation is prompted by the idea of his ‘explosive seriousness’, aMehr lesen

Franziska Pietsch truly takes ownership of Bartók’s Solo Sonata. Her interpretation is prompted by the idea of his ‘explosive seriousness’, a notion that fans the flames of her performance, especially in the opening Chaconne and the Fugue that follows, where the voicing has an orchestral dynamism about it. The Chaconne leavens anger with moments of profound repose, always spinning the illusion that this isn’t Bartók’s music but Pietsch’s own, that we just happened to walk in while she was in the throes of spontaneous creation. That’s the effect but the truth is rather more subtle, a carefully wrought structure that’s never jemmied out of shape. The Melodia is beautifully phrased; the closing Presto a frenzied will o’-the-wisp where the quarter-tones are an integrated part of the narrative. So often they sound accidental rather than colouristic.

It’s fair to say that Bartók’s Sonata is the principal draw here but the second of Ysaÿe’s Solo Sonatas (dedicated to the great French violinist Jacques Thibaud) is also a work to reckon with, its opening ‘Obsession’ toying with Bach’s E major Prelude (Solo Partita No 3) while ghosting the ‘Dies irae’ chant, which dominates the rest of the piece. Again the cut and thrust of Pietsch’s playing makes a big impression, while the Bachian axis is nearly as evident in the single-movement Third Sonata, dedicated to that pre-eminent Bachian Georges Enescu. Here passion takes the upper hand and Pietsch never stints in that respect, nor in her masterful handling of chords.

Perhaps the lightest work on the programme is Prokofiev’s Solo Sonata which, as Norbert Hornig tells us in his useful booklet note, was composed in 1947 as an exercise in unison-playing for violin students. Of especial note is the folky third movement, where Pietsch focuses the spirit to perfection. Audite’s sound quality is extremely realistic so if the programme appeals, I wouldn’t hesitate. If it’s just the Bartók Sonata in digital sound you’re after then Pietsch is up there with Kelemen (Hungaroton, 5/13) and Ehnes (Chandos, 1/13), maybe even marginally more outspoken than either.
Franziska Pietsch truly takes ownership of Bartók’s Solo Sonata. Her interpretation is prompted by the idea of his ‘explosive seriousness’, a

Die Zeit
Die Zeit | N° 48 - 22. November 2018 | Holger Noltze | November 22, 2018 | source: https://www.zeit... Spielen, um zu überleben

Die Geigerin Franziska Pietsch wuchs in der DDR auf und lernte im Westen, was Freiheit in der Musik bedeutet. [...] „Die Möglichkeit, mit der Welt eins zu sein. Für einen Augenblick absolut."<br /> Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Geigerin Franziska Pietsch wuchs in der DDR auf und lernte im Westen, was Freiheit in der Musik bedeutet. [...] „Die Möglichkeit, mit der Welt eins zu sein. Für einen Augenblick absolut."

www.opusklassiek.nl | november 2018 | Aart van der Wal | November 14, 2018 | source: https://www.opus...

Ihr [Franziska Pietschs] Spiel offenbart wieder Musik, die durch Abgründe geht: Sie sucht ständig nach ihren Ausdrucksgrenzen, ohne über das Gechriebene hinauszugehen. Es ist eine besondere Mischung aus Rebellion und Melancholie, die sich abwechselnd zynisch, spöttisch und lyrisch, weitreichend oder sehr intim offenbart.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ihr [Franziska Pietschs] Spiel offenbart wieder Musik, die durch Abgründe geht: Sie sucht ständig nach ihren Ausdrucksgrenzen, ohne über das Gechriebene hinauszugehen. Es ist eine besondere Mischung aus Rebellion und Melancholie, die sich abwechselnd zynisch, spöttisch und lyrisch, weitreichend oder sehr intim offenbart.

Merchant Infos

Works for Solo Violin: Bartók - Prokofiev - Ysaÿe
article number: 97.758
EAN barcode: 4022143977588
price group: BCA
release date: 2. November 2018
total time: 64 min.

News

date /
Typ
title
Rating
Jun 28, 2019
Review

Süddeutsche Zeitung
GEGEN DEN STRICH
May 28, 2019
Review

American Record Guide
This is the fourth recording by German violinist Franziska Pietsch that I have...
May 28, 2019
Review

Fanfare
The blurb for this new recital from the estimable German violinist Franziska...
May 28, 2019
Review

Das Orchester
Die Orientierung an Formensprache und Ausdrucksvielfalt von Johann Sebastian...
Mar 19, 2019
Review

www.qobuz.com
Kaum 30 Jahre trennen diese drei Werke für Solo-Violine und doch, was für ein...
Jan 28, 2019
Award

Musik: 5/5 Sternen - Works for Solo Violin: Bartók - Prokofiev - Ysaÿe
Jan 28, 2019
Review

Fono Forum
Es ist mutig, ein Album ausschließlich mit Sonaten für Violine solo...
Jan 24, 2019
Info

Longlist 1/2019 of German Record Critics’ Award (PdSK)
Jan 21, 2019
Info

BROADCAST: SWR2 Radiophon
Jan 7, 2019
Review

http://klassiker.welt.de
Brugs Beste: Nummer 20 – Franziska Pietsch gibt allein ihrer Geige eine starke, reife, ungefügte Stimme
Dec 18, 2018
Info

BROADCAST: WDR 3 TonArt
Dec 18, 2018
Review

WDR 3
BROADCAST
Dec 10, 2018
Award

5/5 Noten - Works for Solo Violin: Bartók - Prokofiev - Ysaÿe
Dec 10, 2018
Review

www.pizzicato.lu
Auch beim Solorepertoire wieder überzeugend
Dec 3, 2018
Review

Gramophone
Franziska Pietsch truly takes ownership of Bartók’s Solo Sonata. Her...
Dec 3, 2018
Review

Spiegel online
Violinen: Bartók würde sich wundern
Nov 22, 2018
Review

Die Zeit
Spielen, um zu überleben
Nov 19, 2018
Info

Advertising in jpc-courier 12/2018
Nov 15, 2018
Review

www.opusklassiek.nl
Ik schreef het al eerder, in mijn bespreking van de beide vioolconcerten van...
Nov 12, 2018
Info

Interview Franziska Pietsch
Nov 7, 2018
Info

Video du jour/ Video des Tages on Qobuz

More from these Composers

More from this Genre

...