Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Franz Schubert: Late Piano Works, Vol. 1

97765 - Franz Schubert: Late Piano Works, Vol. 1

aud 97.765
please choose the quality
Auto-Rip:
When you complete a purchase of a physical album (including CDs, vinyl and other formats), a free MP3 version of that album is added to your basket.

Andrea Lucchesini has called Franz Schubert’s late piano works his “recent great love”. Now he acts out this love in three CDs for audite – masterful performances by the renowned Italian pianist whose interpretations are informed by his expertise in Beethoven as well as musical modernism.more

Franz Schubert

"[...] eine Produktion von geradezu beispielhafter Klarheit und Perfektion, auch klanglich." (Fono Forum)

Informationen

Italy tends not to be considered as a cradle of pianism in the same way as are Russia, Austria or, more recently, China. Since 1945 only a small number of Italian pianists have reached top international standards - they include Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli and his pupil Maurizio Pollini, or Maria Tipo and her pupil Andrea Lucchesini who was born in 1965 in Tuscany and caused a sensation at an early age. Even then, he mastered the great repertoire. But because, for Lucchesini, music knows no limits, he has always promoted the revolutionaries around Arnold Schoenberg as well as his compatriot Luciano Berio. And studying musical modernism has, naturally, informed Lucchesini's approach to his favourite composers of the past, Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert.

audite have now managed to win over the Florentine master pianist for a three-part recording series dedicated to his impressive interpretations of late Schubert works. The series opens with two sonatas that are closely linked to one another, alongside the atmospheric Allegretto in C minor, D. 915 of 1827. The Sonata in A minor, D. 537, written when Schubert was twenty years old, features a dance-like melody to which he would return eleven years later when he worked on his mature Sonata in A major, D. 959. The reworking of the theme highlights the distance between Schubert's middle and late creative periods. What is initially a rousing, though slightly traditional tune, later appears embedded in a richer harmonic framework, but also in a more virtuosic form, at times almost transfigured.

It is this compositional and emotional range in Schubert's music that is especially fascinating to Andrea Lucchesini. "One recognises the difference between the artist who entertained his friends at social gatherings, and the composer working in solitude - without any prospect of publishing or performing his works, completely confined to his internal world where he felt many precipices. One has to take a plunge into his emotional labyrinth, not only to become intoxicated with his fabulous themes, but also to recognise their infinite variations that take one's breath away. This is how the work of a performer became a complete immersion for me."

Vol. II, featuring Piano Sonata No. 21 in B flat major and Three Piano Pieces, D. 946, is planned be released in spring 2020.
Vol. III, presenting Piano Sonatas No. 18 & No. 19, is scheduled for release in autumn 2020 and will complete the recording series of Schubert's late piano works.

Reviews

Piano News
Piano News | September / Oktober 2019 | Carsten Dürer | September 1, 2019

[...] schnell erkennt man, wie der Pianist dynamische Variabilität nutzt, um die dramatischen Ebenen auszuleuchten, er mit viel Emphase den Gedanken Schuberts nachspürt, die charakterlichen Wechsel aus dem beginnenden Miniaturmotiv entwickelt. [...] Das ist insgesamt großartiges Klavierspiel, mit einer sehr persönlichen Darstellung von Schuberts Musik.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
[...] schnell erkennt man, wie der Pianist dynamische Variabilität nutzt, um die dramatischen Ebenen auszuleuchten, er mit viel Emphase den Gedanken Schuberts nachspürt, die charakterlichen Wechsel aus dem beginnenden Miniaturmotiv entwickelt. [...] Das ist insgesamt großartiges Klavierspiel, mit einer sehr persönlichen Darstellung von Schuberts Musik.

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | September 2019 | Michael Church | September 1, 2019

Sometimes a personal voice can be hard to describe. The music is very familiar, yet somehow this Italian pianist manages to make it all seem as thoughMehr lesen

Sometimes a personal voice can be hard to describe. The music is very familiar, yet somehow this Italian pianist manages to make it all seem as though created on the spur of the moment – every phrase feels like part of an ongoing soliloquy. Andrea Lucchesini has an unusual pedigree among Schubertians. He has been a noted modernist: as a close collaborator with Luciano Berio he premiered that composer's challenging final work for piano.

He approaches Schubert via Beethoven, and describes himself as a fellow-Wanderer. Studying late Schubert, he says, requires the capacity to 'follow the Wanderer on his path, to take a plunge into his emotional labyrinth', and to achieve 'complete immersion' in his work. He particularly stresses the importance of the 'accompanying' parts: for Schubert, he says, these were never secondary, their purpose being to intensify the drama, 'or create elegiac counterparts'.

Classical restraint marks the opening of D537, with a sound so dry that it almost suggests the intimacy of a fortepiano. In theAndantino – locus classicus for those who argue that Schubert had a nervous breakdown – the emotions are fastidiously controlled with a rocksteady pulse; the Scherzo has lovely delicacy, and the Rondo moves from tenderness to passion and back to tenderness again, its hesitant closing bars exquisitely encompassing the conflicting emotions of the piece. Lucchesini celebrates the enigmatic nature of the Allegretto D915, while D537 is full of fleeting delights: the trio-style middle section of the Allegretto quasi andantino is daintily prancing, with the main theme making its reprise in a sudden burst of beauty.
Sometimes a personal voice can be hard to describe. The music is very familiar, yet somehow this Italian pianist manages to make it all seem as though

Audiophile Audition
Audiophile Audition | Aug 12, 2019 | Gary Lemco | August 12, 2019 | source: https://www.auda...

The resonance of Lucchesini’s upper register shines brightly, courtesy of producer Ludger Boeckenhoff.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The resonance of Lucchesini’s upper register shines brightly, courtesy of producer Ludger Boeckenhoff.

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | August 2019 | Ingo Harden | August 1, 2019

Vorbei die Zeiten, in denen nach Schnabel und Erdmann auch ein junger Alfred Brendel noch eine Lanze für Schuberts Klaviersonaten brechen musste:Mehr lesen

Vorbei die Zeiten, in denen nach Schnabel und Erdmann auch ein junger Alfred Brendel noch eine Lanze für Schuberts Klaviersonaten brechen musste: Sie, und allen voran die drei "späten" Sonaten aus dem Todesjahr 1828, haben heute einen Repertoire-Status erreicht, der sie Beethovens Sonaten an die Seite rückt.

Zu den vielen Pianisten, die sich inzwischen mit ihnen auf CD auseinandergesetzt haben, tritt jetzt Andrea Lucchesini. Für den Italiener, der früh durch seine Gesamteinspielung der Beethoven-Sonaten bekannt wurde, ist Schubert nach eigener Aussage "die große Liebe der letzten Jahre" und audite bot ihm jetzt die Gelegenheit, diese Liebe in einer dreibändigen Folge zu dokumentieren. "Volume 1" dieser "Late Piano Works" kombiniert die festlich-konzertante A-Dur-Sonate sehr sinnvoll mit dem elf Jahre älteren Vorläuferwerk in a-Moll, von dem Schubert ja das graziöse Thema des Mittelsatzes im Finalrondo aufgegriffen hat – in romantischerer Einkleidung.

Herausgekommen ist eine Produktion von geradezu beispielhafter Klarheit und Perfektion, auch klanglich. Gewiss, Lucchesini ist kein Spieler, der die schlanke Schlüssigkeit der Musik unterstreicht, wie sie einst Kempff seiner Interpretation mitgab. Und noch weniger ist er der Mann, der drängende untergründige Strömungen des Komponierten zur Geltung bringt; da sind ihm Brendel, Arrau oder Uchida voraus. Aber die Aufnahme lässt keinen Wunsch offen, was die Sorgfalt angeht, mit der er jeden Ton, jede Phrase geformt, Anschlag und Dynamik subtil differenziert und das (hier ähnlich wie beim Schwesterwerk in B-Dur fast unvermeidliche) Rubato "organisch" eingesetzt hat: Für alle, die sich von einer Aufnahme mehr pure Notentreue als interpretatorische Ausdeutung wünschen.
Vorbei die Zeiten, in denen nach Schnabel und Erdmann auch ein junger Alfred Brendel noch eine Lanze für Schuberts Klaviersonaten brechen musste:

Gramophone
Gramophone | August 2019 | Jed Distler | August 1, 2019

The first volume in Andrea Lucchesini’s projected survey of Schubert’s late piano works cheats a bit by including the relatively early A minorMehr lesen

The first volume in Andrea Lucchesini’s projected survey of Schubert’s late piano works cheats a bit by including the relatively early A minor Sonata alongside the big A major Sonata from the composer’s last year. I, for one, wholeheartedly approve of this inspired coupling, which allows one to hear the D959 Rondo’s main theme at close proximity to its earlier version in D537’s Allegretto.

In the A minor’s opening Allegro, Lucchesini’s massive, granitic approach decidedly takes Schubert’s ma non troppo qualifier to heart. His outsize dynamics impart an austere countenance to the music that differs from the animated intimacy conveyed in Michelangeli’s 1981 DG recording. It barely hints at the aforementioned Allegretto’s controlled transparency and pinpointed voicings. For the Allegro vivace finale, Lucchesini reverts back to monumental mode, and here I prefer Eldar Nebolsin’s comparably focused yet faster, more pliable Naxos recording.

One might assume that Lucchesini’s 17-minute timing for D959’s first movement indicates a slower than usual tempo, along with his observation of the exposition repeat. But timings are deceptive. Minutes and seconds add up on account of the pianist modifying Schubert’s basic Allegro directive with frequent italicisations of phrase and emphatic caesuras and tenutos. Where others press ahead (Zimerman, Goode and Uchida, for example), Lucchesini lovingly lingers. He sustains his ruminatively unfolding Andantino with subtle ebb and flow, without quite matching the hypnotic legato and timbral allure of Imogen Cooper’s live recording. While Lucchesini carefully organises the dynamics in pursuit of maximum dramatic effect at the harrowing central climax, the latter falls short of

Pollini’s unrelenting intensity and inevitability. The Scherzo’s tiny hesitations and inflections seem a tad unctuous rather than pointedly angular, as in Alfred Brendel’s valedictory live recording. As in the first movement, Lucchesini can’t help stopping to sniff at the many roadside posies spread across the finale, in contrast to Pollini’s more internalised and proportioned sense of rubato. It takes maybe five or six minutes into the movement for Lucchesini to find his emotional centre and lock into the music’s gathering momentum.

Listeners familiar with Claudio Arrau’s expansive and characterfully contrasted 1980 Philips recording of the Allegretto will find a stylistically similar yet blunter counterpart in Lucchesini’s interpretation. Fine annotations and generally good engineering that tends towards harshness at the loudest moments. Jed Distler D537 – selected comparisons: Michelangeli (9/81R) (DG) 457 762-2GOR Nebolsin (8/11) (NAXO) 8 572459 D959 – selected comparisons: Arrau (7/83R) (PHIL) 473 895-2PM2 Pollini (4/88R) (DG) 474 613-2GOR2 Brendel (3/06) (DECC) 475 7191DX2 Cooper (9/09) (AVIE) AV2156
The first volume in Andrea Lucchesini’s projected survey of Schubert’s late piano works cheats a bit by including the relatively early A minor

Der neue Merker
Der neue Merker | 28.06.2019 | Alexander Walther | June 28, 2019 Franz Schuberts Klavierwerk mit Andrea Lucchesini bei audite eingespielt
Die Nähe Beethovens bleibt spürbar

Die Verfeinerung des musikalischen Satzes spielt bei Andrea LucchesinisMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Verfeinerung des musikalischen Satzes spielt bei Andrea Lucchesinis

www.qobuz.com | 27. JUNI 2019 | Francois Hudry | June 27, 2019 | source: https://www.qobu... Andrea Lucchesini: Meine große Liebe Schubert
Der italienische Pianist macht sich mit größter Achtsamkeit an die letzten Werke Schuberts...

Andrea Lucchesinis Karriere verläuft unauffällig, im Schatten der in denMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Andrea Lucchesinis Karriere verläuft unauffällig, im Schatten der in den

Deutschlandfunk
Deutschlandfunk | 25. Juni 2019, "Musikszene" | Michael Struck-Schloen | June 25, 2019 Toskanische Klarheit
Der Pianist Andrea Lucchesini

Als Andrea Lucchesini 1983, mit 18 Jahren, seinen ersten Wettbewerb gewann, gab es noch so etwas wie eine italienische Klavierschule. Ihre HeldenMehr lesen

Als Andrea Lucchesini 1983, mit 18 Jahren, seinen ersten Wettbewerb gewann, gab es noch so etwas wie eine italienische Klavierschule. Ihre Helden waren Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, Maurizio Pollini ‒ und Maria Tipo, von der Lucchesini Jahre lang unterrichtet wurde. Der gebürtige Toskaner war ihr „Produkt“, in technischer und musikalischer Hinsicht. Aber er entwickelte bald seinen eigenen Kopf, verzichtete auf eine Karriere als Virtuose, die ihm die Plattenfirmen nahelegten, und suchte Alternativen. Zeitgenössische Komponisten wie Luciano Berio interessierten ihn mehr als Liszt, Lucchesini spielte Kammermusik, unterrichtete, entwickelte seinen glasklaren, aber emotionalen Stil. Am Beginn des Jahrtausends versenkte er sich in den Kosmos Beethoven und nahm die 32 Klaviersonaten auf; jetzt hat er sich genauso intensiv und reflektiert mit dem Spätwerk von Franz Schubert auseinandergesetzt.

„Schubert ist in allem, was er tut, der ewige Fremde: ständig auf der Suche, immer auf Wanderschaft, ein Mensch auf der Suche nach sich selbst, nach einer Welt, die er doch nie finden wird. Für mich erzählt davon seine Musik: von der Suche nach einer besseren Welt.“

Wanderschaft und ständige Suche ‒ womöglich nach einer „besseren Welt“: damit können sich viele Künstler identifizieren, die ihren Weg nicht als eine vorgezeichnete Linie verstehen, sondern als Möglichkeit, die Kunst und die eigene Existenz zu umkreisen, in ihrer ganzen Fülle zu erfahren. Andrea Lucchesini gehört zu den Suchenden unter den Pianisten der Gegenwart. Und er ist, über Irrwege und Phasen der Reifung, mit 54 Jahren bei Franz Schubert angekommen ‒ einem Komponisten, in dem er sich wiederfindet, in vielfacher Hinsicht.

„Schubert passt in keine Schublade. Während Beethoven seiner Sache immer sicher war ‒ nach dem Motto: „Es muss sein!“ ‒, ist Schubert immer auf der Flucht. Bei ihm gibt es keine Sicherheiten. Er schreibt nur für sich selbst, im Wissen, dass die meisten seiner Werke weder veröffentlicht noch gespielt werden. Der wesentliche Unterschied zu Beethoven und zu vielen anderen ist, dass Schubert in seiner Musik keine Ideen ausdrücken will, sondern alle Regungen in seinem Inneren.
Und ganz plötzlich ist es, als wolle er rebellieren gegen dieses innere Gefühl der Niedergeschlagenheit und der Trauer. Da ist dann wieder dieser Wunsch nach einer besseren Welt. Und wir wissen aus seiner Biografie, dass es bei ihm Augenblicke großer Begeisterung und schwerer Depression gab. In seiner Musik findet man das andauernd.
Man muss sagen, dass es heute die nationalen Klavierschulen nicht mehr gibt. Als ich etwa 20 Jahre alt war, also in den achtziger Jahren, konnte man bei Wettbewerben sofort die russische Schule erkennen, genauso die amerikanische, die deutsche oder französische Art zu spielen. Heute, in unserer globalisierten Welt, kann jeder überall bei unterschiedlichen Lehrern studieren. Nehmen Sie die Pianisten aus China, Korea oder Japan, die in England, Deutschland oder Österreich studieren ‒ man kann einfach nicht mehr erkennen, welcher Pianist zu welcher Schule gehört.

Die italienische Schule war vor allem russisch beeinflusst. Am Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts waren die Klavierlehrer hier russisch geprägt, vor allem durch die Schule von Anton Rubinstein. Einer seiner Schüler hat sich in Neapel niedergelassen und hier eine italienische Schule gegründet mit deutlich russischem Einfluss: Der Schwerpunkt lag auf Klangschönheit oder auf der Gesanglichkeit des Anschlags. Aus dieser neapolitanisch-russischen Art zu spielen ging dann die Schule von Maria Tipo hervor.“

Andrea Lucchesini spielt die Sonate A-Dur von Domenico Scarlatti, K 342. In seiner Aufnahme für das Label Audite hat Lucchesini sechs Scarlatti-Sonaten mit den Sechs Encores des 2003 verstorbenen Luciano Berio verzahnt ‒ ein Dialog zwischen Alt und Neu, der wunderbar funktioniert, weil der Pianist beide Komponisten mit seinem brillant perlenden Anschlag und seinem Sinn fürs Erzählerische verbindet.
Beide Qualitäten verdankt er letztlich seiner verehrten Lehrerin Maria Tipo. Mit sechs Jahren kam er in ihre Florentiner Klasse und blieb insgesamt zwölf Jahre. Noch heute ist er stolz darauf, ihr „Originalprodukt“ zu sein.

„Maria Tipo war nicht nur eine große Pianistin ‒ sie hatte auch eine grandiose Begabung und eine unglaubliche Leidenschaft fürs Unterrichten. Manchmal hat sie ihren Schülern mehr Zeit gewidmet als ihren eigenen Konzertvorbereitungen. Diese Hingabe ist für mich heute ein Ansporn für meine eigene Lehrtätigkeit ‒ ich will etwas von dem an die Jugend zurückgeben, was ich selbst von Maria Tipo bekommen habe.
Das Prinzip ihres Unterrichts war die Verbindung von höchster technischer Perfektion und größter Entspannung, wobei immer der schöne Klang im Vordergrund stand. Das alles ist der Grund, warum sie so viele fantastische Schüler hatte, unter denen keiner dem anderen gleicht. Wir sind alle grundverschieden, denn sie hat uns zwar die Grundregeln des Klavierspiels beigebracht, dabei aber jedem und jeder von uns die eigene Entwicklung und Persönlichkeit belassen.“

Mit der Sonate h-Moll von Franz Liszt wagte sich Andrea Lucchesini 1983 beim Dino-Ciani-Wettbewerb in Mailand vor die internationale Jury: ein 18-jähriger, schüchterner Jüngling mit Lockenkopf, der zwar damals schon Schubert im Gepäck hatte, sich aber vor allem mit Liszt, Bartók und Tschaikowsky den ersten Preis erspielte. Das Plattenlabel EMI witterte in Lucchesini den neuen italienischen Jungstar und produzierte mit ihm in schneller Folge die Schlachtrösser des Virtuosen-Repertoires: Liszt, Chopin, schließlich auch die Hammerklavier-Sonate von Beethoven. 1988 kam die fünfte Platte heraus, dann verschwand Lucchesini wieder vom Markt ‒ für ihn war das Virtuosendasein ein Holzweg.

„Als junger Mensch war ich extrem schüchtern und überhaupt kein extrovertierter Typ mit zirzensischen Ambitionen, das war ich überhaupt nicht. Aber die Plattenfirma hat mir dieses Etikett des Virtuosen aufgedrückt, was auch ein Anreiz für die Konzertveranstalter. Plötzlich musste ich lange Tourneen machen mit den Konzerten von Tschaikowsky und Liszt. Ich konnte das spielen, aber irgendwann dämmerte es mir, dass ich eine ganz andere Art von Künstler war, weniger instinktiv und eher rational. Danach bin ich wie viele andere in eine Art Wachstumskrise gekommen ‒ also in diesen Zustand, in dem sich nach dem eher unbewussten Zugang zur Musik in der Jugend ein klareres Bewusstsein, die Reflexion meldet. Wenn man jung ist, ist alles ganz einfach. Plötzlich aber musste ich jetzt über jede Note nachdenken, alles neu studieren. Und dabei war mir die Kammermusik sehr hilfreich. Musik mit anderen zu machen, war ungeheuer wichtig und bereichernd. Auch meine Technik hat davon profitiert: Wenn man mit Streichern zusammenspielt, bekommt man ein ganz anderes Gefühl für den Klavierklang, man stellt sich auf den gesanglichen Ton der Streicher ein, entfernt sich vom perkussiven Klavierton und bekommt ‒ bei aller Akkuratesse ‒ am Ende einen weicheren Klang.“

Andrea Lucchesini und das Quartetto di Cremona spielen das Finale von Camille Saint-Saëns‘ frühem Klavierquintett op. 14 ‒ ein romantisch schwelgendes Werk, in dem sich der Pianist tatsächlich erstaunlich auf den Atem und die Klanglichkeit der Streicher einlässt.
Lucchesini wurde 1965 in der Provinz Pistoia in der Toskana geboren, einer Kulturlandschaft, die er zeit seines Lebens nur für Konzertreisen verlassen hat. Einige Jahre wirkte er in der Leitung der Musikschule von Fiesole in den florentinischen Hügeln; heute unterrichtet er in Rom, gestaltet aber noch das Programm des Kammermusikfestivals in Florenz. Und dass ihm der Dialekt seiner Stadt geläufig ist, merkt man, wenn er hin und wieder die harten K-Laute aspiriert ‒ oder „auffrisst“, wie man das in Florenz nennt.
Noch immer hat Lucchesini seinen Lockenschopf, der mittlerweile etwas ergraut ist; und noch immer wirkt er etwas schüchtern, wenn er eine Cafeteria sucht, um sich bei einem Espresso über Schubert oder Beethoven auszutauschen, dessen 32 Klaviersonaten er am Beginn des Jahrtausends eingespielt hat. Vor der Beschäftigung mit Beethoven allerdings lag die Begegnung mit einem Komponisten, der Lucchesinis Denken über Musik umgekrempelt hat.

„Enorm wichtig war für mich die Begegnung mit Luciano Berio. Er hat mir die Tür zur zeitgenössischen Musik geöffnet ‒ zu einer Welt, die ich damals kaum kannte.
Nach meiner Meinung war Berio einer der größten Komponisten. In Italien gehörte er außerdem zu den wenigen, deren Stimme in der Musikpolitik etwas galt. Wenn Berio sich zu etwas äußerte, haben alle zugehört, sogar die Politiker. Er wollte, dass sich etwas änderte im defizitären italienischen Musikleben, dass die Ausbildungsstätten besser funktionieren. Und er setzte sich für die Wertschätzung zeitgenössische Komponisten und die Aufführung ihrer Werke ein.
Außerdem ist er vehement gegen das „Spezialistentum in der neuen Musik“ angegangen, wie er es nannte. Ihm war wichtig, dass sich die großen Interpreten von Beethoven, Mozart und Chopin der zeitgenössischen Musik widmeten, denn für ihn gab es im musikalischen Zugang keinen Unterschied.“

Im Jahr 2001, zwei Jahre vor Berios Tod, hat Lucchesini seine Klaviersonate in Zürich uraufgeführt ‒ ein Werk, bei dem Komponist und Interpret eng zusammengearbeitet haben.

„Er hatte großen Respekt vor der geschichtlichen Tradition des Instruments. Für mich war das eine große Lehre, denn aus diesem Respekt heraus hat er die Spielweise der Instrumente nicht grundlegend verändert, sondern sie so belassen, wie sie war. Er hatte kein Interesse an ungewöhnlichen Effekten, sondern ging von dem aus, was von den Cembalisten bis hin zu den Meistern des 20. Jahrhunderts geschrieben worden war. Seine Stücke sind höchst virtuos und schwer ‒ aber nichts ist unspielbar. Denn er hat sich während der Komposition mit den Interpreten ausgetauscht, um mit ihnen zusammen herauszufinden, was möglich war und was nicht.“

Über Luciano Berio und die Kammermusik hat sich Andrea Lucchesini auch einen Komponisten neu erschlossen, der schon im Unterricht bei Maria Tipo eine wichtige Rolle spielte: Ludwig van Beethoven. Fast die gesamte Kammermusik mit Klavier hat Lucchesini zusammen mit dem Cellisten Mario Brunello und anderen gespielt; dann wagte er sich an die 32 Klaviersonaten, die er im Konzert mitschneiden ließ und 2004 als CD-Box veröffentlicht hat.

„Mit Beethoven habe ich unglaublich viel erfahren über die Entwicklung und das Innenleben des Instruments. Das ist, als würde einen Beethoven an die Hand nehmen und einem all die Wunder zeigen, die das Klavier umschließt. Man findet Beethovens grandiosen Zugriff, den „Beethovenschen Code“ in allen Sonaten, von der ersten bis zur letzten. Aber der Gebrauch des Instruments hat sich doch sehr verändert. In der frühen Periode knüpfte er eher an Haydn, Mozart oder Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach an: Das ist alles sehr technisch gedacht, er komponierte so zu sagen Schwarzweiß für Tasten.“

Dann folgt in der mittleren Phase der spektakuläre Beethoven, der seine Musik mit großer Virtuosität inszeniert, wenn man an die Waldstein-Sonate oder die „Appassionata“ denkt. Interessant ist, dass er sich dann in der Spätzeit immer mehr der Tongebung und der Kantabilität der Streichinstrumente annähert. Man findet das in den letzten Sonaten op. 109-111, vor allem in op. 110.
Andrea Lucchesini, der in den 1990er Jahren sein Klavierspiel grundlegend überdacht und ausgeschliffen hat, konnte von allen Phasen Beethovens profitieren: Seine Anschlagstechnik ist glasklar, wobei jeder Ton Gewicht und Klangschönheit besitzt; er beherrscht den virtuosen Zugriff, der den modernen Flügel ausreizt, ohne ihn zu sprengen. Lucchesinis wahre Fähigkeit aber ist die Gesanglichkeit der Phrasen und ein Klangzauber, bei dem das Instrument plötzlich zu leuchten beginnt. Und musste er damit nicht automatisch bei Schubert ankommen?
Mit den Impromptus hat Lucchesini vor gut zehn Jahren seine Schubert-Erkundungen begonnen; danach folgte eine gewagte Verknüpfung der Moments musicaux mit dem 2009 entstandenen Zyklus Idyll und Abgrund von Jörg Widmann, der sich mit Schubert kompositorisch auseinandersetzt. Jetzt hat Lucchesini beim Detmolder Label Audite die Aufnahme der späten Schubert-Sonaten begonnen ‒ und ist dabei tief in die Poesie und Kompositionsweise eingedrungen.

„Es gibt die Theorie, dass das Quecksilber, das Schubert gegen seine Syphilis einnehmen musste, bei ihm Halluzinationen ausgelöst hat. Ich denke da zum Beispiel an den Mittelteil im zweiten Satz der A-Dur-Sonate, Deutsch-Verzeichnis 959. Diese musikalischen Fragmente und Splitter, die er da komponiert, sind eigentlich unerklärlich ‒ das ist, als würde die ganze Natur aufbegehren. So etwas gibt es in den übrigen Sonatensätzen nicht, das ist völlig außergewöhnlich.

Sicher gehört auch das Dämonische, Bedrohliche zu den späten Sonaten. Aber hart am Abgrund winkt bei Schubert immer auch das Rettende, die Erlösung.

„Nehmen wir den letzten Satz der A-Dur-Sonate. Auch hier wiederholt er ständig die gleiche Figur ‒ aber dann genügt ihm eine minimale Veränderung, um uns ganz woanders hinzuführen. Das ist ein besonderer Augenblick, den ich gern als „Erhebung“ bezeichne.
Ich nenne ganz bewusst „Erhebung“ ‒ so etwas gibt es bei Beethoven nur selten, aber bei Schubert andauernd, auch in den kleineren Stücken. Mir kommt es dann vor, als würde Schubert den Himmel berühren, als würde er bald im Paradies sein. Erst befinden wir uns auf dem Boden, doch plötzlich öffnet sich ein Spalt, durch den der Himmel sichtbar wird. Und so etwas gibt es tatsächlich nur bei Schubert, vielleicht noch bei Gustav Mahler.
Man hat Schubert oft seine Längen vorgeworfen ‒ ich halte das für einen fatalen Fehler. Denn der Grund für diese gewaltigen Dimensionen bei Schubert und dafür, dass die Motive sich immer im Kreis drehen, ist, dass er die Welt seiner Musik erst dann verlassen will, wenn er den überzeugenden Weg gefunden hat.
Ich denke zum Beispiel an die Pausen ‒ sie sind ungeheuer wichtig. Statt eine Modulation vorzubereiten, macht er eine Pause, eine überraschende Unterbrechung. Im Finale der A-Dur-Sonate kommt das Thema plötzlich zum Stillstand. Dann verändert er die Tonlage, geht nach a-Moll statt A-Dur ‒ dann eine erneute Unterbrechung und er ist in F-Dur: So könnte es auch gehen ‒ aber vielleicht doch nicht … Nachdem er so mehrere Möglichkeiten ausprobiert hat, kehrt er zur Grundtonart zurück. Das wirkt dann wie ein Seufzer der Erleichterung, dass er am Ende seinen Weg doch noch gefunden hat.“

Das war: Toskanische Klarheit ‒ der Pianist Andrea Lucchesini. Eine „Musikszene“ von Michael Struck-Schloen.
Als Andrea Lucchesini 1983, mit 18 Jahren, seinen ersten Wettbewerb gewann, gab es noch so etwas wie eine italienische Klavierschule. Ihre Helden

www.pizzicato.lu | 07/06/2019 | Remy Franck | June 7, 2019 | source: https://www.pizz... Lucchesinis kraftvoll drängender Schubert

An Andrea Lucchesinis Schubert-Interpretationen scheiden sich die Geister. Die beiden Sonaten D. 959 und D. 537 sowie das Allegretto D. 915 spielt erMehr lesen

An Andrea Lucchesinis Schubert-Interpretationen scheiden sich die Geister. Die beiden Sonaten D. 959 und D. 537 sowie das Allegretto D. 915 spielt er aus einem Geist heraus, musikalisch sehr überlegt, souverän in der Gestik, mit viel Kraft und Lebendigkeit. In den schnellen Sätzen gibt es viel leidenschaftliches Drängen, starke Kontraste und eine große dynamische Spannweite.

In der Sonate D. 959, die Schubert im Todesjahr 1828 komponierte, werden viel Melancholie und auch Abgründe überspielt, und selbst das Trio im Andantino bleibt daher weniger verstörend als in anderen Interpretationen, die generell das Lyrische mehr betonen als Lucchesini, der Schubert insgesamt drastischer gestaltet als viele seiner Kollegen. Sieht der Italiener in dieser Musik vielleicht eher die Revolte eines Todgeweihten?

Aber ist Schuberts Musik nicht eigentlich doch das Gegenstück von Beethoven? Verträgt Schubert einen derart drängenden Vortrag, ein so straffes Musizieren, wie es Lucchesini uns hier hören lässt? Diese Fragen zeigen, dass es sehr wohl interessant ist, sich mit diesem Schubert auseinanderzusetzen.

Andrea Lucchesini’s Schubert interpretations will divide the spirits. The two sonatas D. 959 and D. 537 as well as the Allegretto D. 915 are played in a very thoughtful, manner, with a lot of strength and liveliness. In the fast movements there is a lot of passionate urge, strong contrasts and a large dynamic range. In the Sonata D. 959, which Schubert composed in 1828, the year of his death, much melancholy and chasms are overplayed, and even the Trio in the Andantino remains less disturbing than in other interpretations, which generally emphasize the lyrical elements more than Lucchesini, who gives the music a more radical character. Does the Italian perhaps emphasize in this music the revolt of a man who is expecting to die? But isn’t Schubert’s music actually the counterpart of Beethoven? Does Schubert tolerate such an urgent performance, such a strict music-making as Lucchesini’s? These questions show that it is anyway interesting to deal with this Schubert.
An Andrea Lucchesinis Schubert-Interpretationen scheiden sich die Geister. Die beiden Sonaten D. 959 und D. 537 sowie das Allegretto D. 915 spielt er

Süddeutsche Zeitung
Süddeutsche Zeitung | 27. Mai 2019 | Helmut Mauró | May 27, 2019 | source: https://www.sued... Adel verpflichtet

[...] dann kommen ja, gerade im Spätwerk von Franz Schubert, dem sein neues Album gewidmet ist, auch die leisen und sanften Passagen, und da entfaltet Lucchesini erstaunliche Präsenz und Zärtlichkeit.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
[...] dann kommen ja, gerade im Spätwerk von Franz Schubert, dem sein neues Album gewidmet ist, auch die leisen und sanften Passagen, und da entfaltet Lucchesini erstaunliche Präsenz und Zärtlichkeit.

Merchant Infos

Franz Schubert: Late Piano Works, Vol. 1
article number: 97.765
EAN barcode: 4022143977656
price group: BCA
release date: 7. June 2019
total time: 72 min.

News

date /
Typ
title
Rating
Sep 18, 2019
Review

Audiophile Audition
Recorded 10-13 November 2018, this sound document testifies to a Schubert...
Sep 2, 2019
Award

Klangwert: 6/6 - Franz Schubert: Late Piano Works, Vol. 1
Sep 2, 2019
Award

Interpretationswert: 5/6 - Franz Schubert: Late Piano Works, Vol. 1
Sep 2, 2019
Review

Piano News
Auf drei Volumes ist diese mit den späten Klavierwerken von Franz Schubert...
Jul 14, 2019
Info

BROADCAST: Radio Coteaux
Aug 25, 2019
Info

BROADCAST: Radio Coteaux
Aug 13, 2019
Review

Deutschlandfunk
Toskanische Klarheit
Aug 12, 2019
Award

Performance: 5/5 Stars - Franz Schubert: Late Piano Works, Vol. 1
Aug 12, 2019
Review

BBC Music Magazine
Sometimes a personal voice can be hard to describe. The music is very familiar,...
Aug 12, 2019
Review

Gramophone
The first volume in Andrea Lucchesini’s projected survey of Schubert’s late...
Aug 1, 2019
Info

advertisement pizzicato.lu
Jun 27, 2019
Info

Video du jour (Qobuz, 27.06.2019)
Jul 15, 2019
Review

www.qobuz.com
Andrea Lucchesini: Meine große Liebe Schubert
Jul 8, 2019
Award

Klang: 5 von 5 - Franz Schubert: Late Piano Works, Vol. 1
Jul 8, 2019
Review

Fono Forum
Vorbei die Zeiten, in denen nach Schnabel und Erdmann auch ein junger Alfred...
Jul 2, 2019
Review

Der neue Merker
Franz Schuberts Klavierwerk mit Andrea Lucchesini bei audite eingespielt
Jun 26, 2019
Info

Advertisement in Gramophone (July 2019)
Jun 12, 2019
Award

4/5 Noten - Franz Schubert: Late Piano Works, Vol. 1
Jun 12, 2019
Review

www.pizzicato.lu
Lucchesinis kraftvoll drängender Schubert
May 28, 2019
Review

Süddeutsche Zeitung
Adel verpflichtet

More from Franz Schubert

More from this Genre

...