Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Piano Trios

92550 - Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Piano Trios

aud 92.550
Bitte Qualität wählen

Felix Mendelssohn BartholdyPiano Trios

Mendelssohn’s Piano Trios of 1839 and 1845 are, along with the piano trios of Beethoven and Schubert, pinnacles of the genre in the nineteenth century.more

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy

Mendelssohn’s Piano Trios of 1839 and 1845 are, along with the piano trios of Beethoven and Schubert, pinnacles of the genre in the nineteenth century.

Informationen

This recording of the Mendelssohn Trios marks the beginning of the cooperation between audite and the Swiss Piano Trio whose recordings are issued on audite from 2011. A recording of the complete Schumann Piano Trios is planned next, with the first volume scheduled for release in June 2011.

Mendelssohn’s Piano Trios of 1839 and 1845 are, along with the piano trios of Beethoven and Schubert, pinnacles of the genre in the nineteenth century. Robert Schumann saw in them a reconciliation of contradictions which left a lasting impression on musical history at the time: the conflicts between lyrical and dramatic form, between intimacy and virtuoso performance, and finally between a universal comprehensibility and subjectivisation. In both trios Mendelssohn found solutions which captivate his listeners through the plasticity of their thematic and melodic invention, their rhythmic succinctness, their formal originality and, particularly, their uninterrupted sound-stream, anticipating Reger.

The Swiss Piano Trio with Martin Lucas Staub (piano), Angela Golubeva (violin) and Sébastien Singer (cello) has won numerous prizes at international competitions, including the International Chamber Music Competition Caltanissetta in Italy and the Johannes Brahms Competition in Austria. Founded in 1998, the ensemble has a busy performing schedule and has played in over 35 countries worldwide. The Trio performs chamber music in great concert halls across the globe. As an ensemble of soloists, the three musicians regularly appear with renowned orchestras. Numerous recordings for radio, television and on disc document the artistic activities of the ensemble.

Reviews

http://theclassicalreviewer.blogspot.de | Saturday, 28 April 2012 | April 28, 2012 Mendelssohn - a lightweight composer?

The two piano trios Op.49 and Op.66 are particularly fine works especiallyMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The two piano trios Op.49 and Op.66 are particularly fine works especially

Stereo
Stereo | 6/2011 Juni | OPf | June 1, 2011 Klaviertrios Nr. 1 + 2
Schweizer Klaviertrio

Wie schön muss Mendelssohns erstes Klaviertrio klingen? "Nicht zu sehr",Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Wie schön muss Mendelssohns erstes Klaviertrio klingen? "Nicht zu sehr",

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 06/11 Juni 2011 | Ole Pflüger | June 1, 2011 Gar schön?

Wie schön muss Mendelssohns erstes Klaviertrio klingen? "Nicht zu sehr", scheint die Antwort des Schweizer Klaviertrios zu sein. Es ist etwas dran.Mehr lesen

Wie schön muss Mendelssohns erstes Klaviertrio klingen? "Nicht zu sehr", scheint die Antwort des Schweizer Klaviertrios zu sein. Es ist etwas dran. Jedenfalls betreibt Angela Golubeva auf ihrer Geige keine Schöntönerei: Kratzig, rauchig, rau ist der Ton, den sie dem Trio vorgibt. Vor allem dem Kopfsatz von Mendelssohns d-Moll-Klaviertrio ist damit sehr geholfen. Er entrinnt der Gefahr, sich zu sehr in seliger Melodiesingerei aufzulösen. Stattdessen wirkt er offen und emotional. Leider schaden die rauen Tonfarben dann dem zweiten Satz des Trios. Wenn Golubeva und der Cellist Sébastien Singer in die Klaviereinleitung von Martin Lucas Staub einsteigen, vernichten sie alle Innigkeit. Es ist ehrenwert, dass das Schweizer Klaviertrio auf eitlen Schönklang und Wabervibrati verzichtet. Manchmal hätten sie – in kleinen Dosen – aber auch nicht geschadet.

Robert Schumann nannte das Werk einmal eine "eine gar schöne Komposition, die nach Jahren noch Enkel und Urenkel erfreuen wird". Golubeva, Singer und Staub widersprechen Schumann, indem sie ihm eine Menge derben Witz und schroffe Melodiebrocken abgewinnen. Bei ihnen ist Mendelssohn mehr als nur "gar schön", er darf auch mal schreien und keifen. Aus dem Kopfsatz von Mendelssohns zweitem Klaviertrio machen die Schweizer dann ein mitreißendes Perpetuum mobile. Vom ersten Klavierton an ist diese Musik nicht aufzuhalten. In den halsbrecherischen Läufen des Scherzos bekräftigen die Musiker diesen Eindruck und beweisen dabei auch noch einmal, wie schön es sein kann, auf Schönheit zu verzichten.
Wie schön muss Mendelssohns erstes Klaviertrio klingen? "Nicht zu sehr", scheint die Antwort des Schweizer Klaviertrios zu sein. Es ist etwas dran.

International Record Review
International Record Review | May 2011 | Mark Tanner | May 1, 2011

That Schumann considered Mendelssohn to be a natural successor to Beethoven, and went on to prize his piano trios so ardently, was a strong indicationMehr lesen

That Schumann considered Mendelssohn to be a natural successor to Beethoven, and went on to prize his piano trios so ardently, was a strong indication that these works were set to assume a prestigious place in the chamber music repertory. In Schumann's eyes , at least, Mendelssohn's was truly the music of the present, if not the future. Schumann would compose piano trios of his own, of course, albeit rather more brooding and emotionally driven.

Written six years apart, in 1839 and 1845, Mendelssohn's trios are cast in four movements and have a similar duration. Additionally, they are both in minor keys, suggestive of something rather splendid or perhaps even narrative in vein. Wolfgang Rathert, author of the erudite if slightly scholarly notes, reminds us of the especial function of minor keys in Beethoven, as well as in Mozart, and argues that Mendelssohn's particular use of minor tonality holds a mirror to the nineteenth century's increasingly sophisticated tastes. Interestingly, both trios, which in general make rather more of the piano part than of the strings, are radiant and optimistic in their dramatic gestures, not in the least bit introspective or doleful , even in their second movements. This new recording from the Swiss Piano Trio is beautifully presented by Audite, with sharp graphics and a nicely contemporary feel to the fold-out cardboard box.

The Trio in D minor , Op. 49 is confidently captured by the players – a nicely impulsive opening movement with a good sense of lyricism and a clear overview in place. Pianist Martin Lucas Staub drives the impetus assertively with an ambitious tempo, and the strings sustain a robust connection with the music's agitated under current. The individual contributions are strong, although I feel the ensemble's best intentions have not always been fully realized in this region of the recording as regards balance. I'd like a fraction more of the piano when all parts are busy, and indeed when there are short-lived soloistic interjections to enjoy (the opening and closing sections to the Andante con moto tranquillo are good examples of this, too). Conversely, the violin seems to be just a little too forward in the mix, overall, particularly during the more impassioned sections, so that the equally important piano and cello textures come over as a little hemmed in. That said, there are some precious softer moments in the ensemble, both in this movement and in the conclusion to the Scherzo, which is ably done. The finale has good drive and the overall impact improved here quite noticeably – the ensemble seemed to relax , introducing greater ingenuity and freedom into this amiable Schubertian melody. There can be no doubting the youthful verve of these musicians, and the closing stages to this movement are as fiery and effervescent as you could hope for , if perhaps slightly missing some of the opportunities to drop the dynamic before picking up the intensity once again.

The Op. 66 Trio, dedicated to Louis Spohr, is in C minor, and it was in this key that Mendelssohn first explored the idea of a piano trio while still a young man; it emerged as more of an experiment than an accomplished work, however. As I hinted at earlier, the similarities in approach to the formal construction and sense of dramatic destiny in both the published trios are such that Mendelssohn clearly felt satisfied with what he had achieved in his D minor Trio. The Swiss Trio seems more at ease with the elasticity of this slightly later work, grabbing my attention rather more quickly than in the D minor. I particularly enjoy the Andante espressivo, which has a lovely serenity to it and some delightful coupling from the strings. The Scherzo is very successful too , with sterling work from Staub, whose glycerine fingerwork carries the momentum without any hint of compromise; here too, a better sense of balance and of the leggiero lines emerges, and the sudden switches in temperament are very well thought through.

My impression of the playing, and indeed of the recording as a whole, grew quite significantly during my survey of this disc. I would very much like to hear these players in the flesh , where I am sure they are capable of even greater vitality and communication.
That Schumann considered Mendelssohn to be a natural successor to Beethoven, and went on to prize his piano trios so ardently, was a strong indication

Fanfare | May/June 2011 | Jerry Dubins | May 1, 2011

My first reaction to receiving this release for review was, “Oh no, not another recording of Mendelssohn’s piano trios!” This now makes 22Mehr lesen

My first reaction to receiving this release for review was, “Oh no, not another recording of Mendelssohn’s piano trios!” This now makes 22 versions I can lay claim to, at least three or four of which I’ve had occasion to review in these pages. I must cede pride of place, however, to Burton Rothleder who claims to have reviewed no fewer than 10 versions. Of those I have in my collection which he happens to have covered, I find myself in agreement with his conclusions about 90-percent of the time. I was favorably impressed and still am, for example, with the Wanderer Trio’s performances on Harmonia Mundi, and I’ve also found much to enjoy in recordings by the Mendelssohn Piano Trio on Centaur and the Amsterdam Piano Trio on Brilliant Classics. To this list, but reviewed by others, I would add the Florestan Trio on Hyperion and the Nash Ensemble on Onyx. With regard to one recent release, however, Burton and I will have to agree to disagree, and that is the Sony recording with Perlman, Ma, and Ax, which made Rothleder’s 2010 Want List. I found these performances to be sluggish, lumpish, and heavy-handed, their slowness in comparison to others quite easily proved by the timings. For me, they miss Mendelssohn’s quicksilver pulse and puckish humor.

I wasn’t quite sure what to expect from the Swiss Piano Trio, an ensemble I’d not previously encountered, though to confess, I did begin my listening with the difficult-to-dislodge idea in my head that Mendelssohn’s piano trios did not need another recording, no matter how good it might be. Imagine then my shock to have all of my doubts and reservations instantly swept away by the most captivating performances of these works I think I’ve ever heard.

Swift in tempo and fleet of foot, but not rushed or breathless; leggiero in bowing and phrasing, but not lightweight or thin in tone; rascally but not roguish in the Scherzo movements; emotionally expressive but not cloying in the Andantes; and strongly persuasive without making over-earnest pie of Mendelssohn’s opening Allegros, the Swiss ensemble plays these works with surpassing elegance, beauty, and absolute technical control and perfection.

In no small measure, this gorgeously recorded hybrid surround-sound Audite SACD is a glory to modern recording technology. The instruments are perfectly placed and perfectly balanced, and the sound is state-of-the-art. I’m not usually one to say, “Throw out all other recordings you have of these works,” but if I were so inclined, this new release would come perilously close to prompting me to say it. These magnificently recorded fantastic performances are urgently recommended.
My first reaction to receiving this release for review was, “Oh no, not another recording of Mendelssohn’s piano trios!” This now makes 22

www.ResMusica.com
www.ResMusica.com | 28 avril 2011 | Jean-Luc Caron | April 28, 2011 Une lecture probe de Mendelssohn

« C’est le maître trio de notre époque… » s’exclama RobertMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
« C’est le maître trio de notre époque… » s’exclama Robert

Westdeutsche Zeitung
Westdeutsche Zeitung | Samstag, 9. April 2011 | wall | April 9, 2011 Dynamisches Trio

Rasant geht es zu in den schnellen Sätzen der beiden Klaviertrios FelixMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rasant geht es zu in den schnellen Sätzen der beiden Klaviertrios Felix

Kulimu
Kulimu | 37. Jg. 2011, Heft 1 | uwa | April 1, 2011 Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Klaviertrio Nr. 1 u. 2
Schweizer Klaviertrio

Seit dem das Schweizer Klaviertrio 2005 den ersten Preis beimMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Seit dem das Schweizer Klaviertrio 2005 den ersten Preis beim

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | N° 212 - 4/2011 | Alain Steffen | April 1, 2011 Ein Meisterstreich

Gerade bei Aufnahmen wie dieser ist es eine Freude für den Rezensenten, die Bestnote Supersonic zu vergeben. Ich muss zugeben, dass ich dieseMehr lesen

Gerade bei Aufnahmen wie dieser ist es eine Freude für den Rezensenten, die Bestnote Supersonic zu vergeben. Ich muss zugeben, dass ich diese Einspielung der Klaviertrios von Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy mit allergrößtem Vergnügen gehört habe. Wieder einmal bestätigt ein junges Ensemble, dass man Kammermusik mit Spielfreude und Engagement von seinem etwas verstaubten und intellektuell-bürgerlichen Image befreien kann.

Dem Schweizer Klaviertrio (Angela Golubeva, Violine, Sébastien Singer, Cello und Martin Lucas Staub, Klavier) gelingt auf Anhieb ein Meisterstreich und der gefährliche Spagat zwischen Unterhaltung, Virtuosität, technischer Versiertheit und kunstvoller Gestaltung. Sicher, Mendelssohns Trios sind dankbare Stücke, aber was das Schweizer Klaviertrio aus dieser Musik macht, mit welcher Dynamik sie diese Werke angehen und mit welch hervorragender Technik sie das Opus 49 und das Opus 66 auszuloten verstehen, ist eindeutig große Kunst. Ja, Kammermusik kann tatsächlich Spaß machen und ebenso intensive wie aufregende Momente bescheren. Eigentlich bräuchte man bei dieser übrigens hervorragend transparent und präsent klingenden SACD-Aufnahme überhaupt keine Worte zu verlieren. Musik und Interpreten sprechen für sich.
Gerade bei Aufnahmen wie dieser ist es eine Freude für den Rezensenten, die Bestnote Supersonic zu vergeben. Ich muss zugeben, dass ich diese

Musik & Theater | April 2011 | Fritz Trümpi | April 1, 2011 Feinfasriger Mendelssohn

Obschon sich das Schweizer Klaviertrio eine erfrischende JugendlichkeitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Obschon sich das Schweizer Klaviertrio eine erfrischende Jugendlichkeit

www.musicweb-international.com
www.musicweb-international.com | Tuesday March 29th | Kevin Sutton | March 29, 2011 Felix Mendelssohn

Robert Schumann, in the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik, hailed Felix Mendelssohn as the Mozart of the nineteenth century, the "brightest musician whoMehr lesen

Robert Schumann, in the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik, hailed Felix Mendelssohn as the Mozart of the nineteenth century, the "brightest musician who sees through the contradictions of our time most clearly and is the first to reconcile them, and he will not be the last artist." This is high praise and a bold prediction coming from one of the foremost musicians of the day. Such praise is borne out in these near perfect piano trios. This is music that is replete with every emotion. Even as they are set in minor keys with somewhat turbulent opening movements, they sound sunny and hopeful, full of wit and charm and no small amount of youthful joie de vivre.

Mendelssohn's own piano playing must have been remarkable, given the sheer virtuosity of the piano writing in these works. The c minor trio opens with a rollicking theme and the piano never quits. A beautifully lyrical Andante follows, and Mendelssohn shows his ability to create a gorgeous melody that, while somewhat sentimental, is never over the top or maudlin. A fleeting scherzo is followed by a jaunty finale. The second trio is no less a masterpiece, flashy without being gaudy, packed full of the wonderful tunes that only a Schubert could match. It struck me as amusing that the theme of the Scherzo is remarkably similar to Legrenzi's Che fiero costume, known the world over to beginning students of singing.

The Schweizer Trio is nothing less than superb in these performances. Particular kudos goes to Martin Lucas Staub, whose keyboard skills are beyond reproach. It is fairly evident that Mendelssohn was thinking beyond the salon when he composed these works. They are so full in scope and rich in tone that he must have had a concert hall in mind. Having said that, Mr. Staub never lets the formidable piano parts overwhelm his string playing colleagues, who by the way, play with spotless intonation, elegant phrasing and youthful panache. I particularly admired the manner in which this ensemble was able to take the fast movements at an almost roller-coaster tempo, yet never leave the listener feeling out of breath. The playing is of such high quality that the music just flows out effortlessly. One is left believing that there is no other way to play this music, and this is a delightful quality. I was thrilled by repeated listening to this disc.
Robert Schumann, in the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik, hailed Felix Mendelssohn as the Mozart of the nineteenth century, the "brightest musician who

Crescendo
Crescendo | Jg. 14, Nr. 2 (März-Mai 2011) | Antoinette Schmelter De Escobar | March 1, 2011 Swiss Piano Trio
WIE MEDELSSOHN SELBST

Wie ein Espresso: Klassik in hochkonzentrierter Form. Seit 1998 spielenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Wie ein Espresso: Klassik in hochkonzentrierter Form. Seit 1998 spielen

Ensemble - Magazin für Kammermusik
Ensemble - Magazin für Kammermusik | März 2011 | Carsten Dürer | March 1, 2011 Mit Spannung weiterhören

Wenn es um das Genre Klaviertrio geht, dann stellen die beiden von FelixMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Wenn es um das Genre Klaviertrio geht, dann stellen die beiden von Felix

Kulturspiegel
Kulturspiegel | März 2011, Heft 3 | Johannes Saltzwedel | March 1, 2011 Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: "Klaviertrios" (Audite)

Viele Ensembles haben diese Werke gespielt; und schlecht klingen sie schonMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Viele Ensembles haben diese Werke gespielt; und schlecht klingen sie schon

Spiegel online | Montag, 28. Februar 2011 | Johannes Saltzwedel | February 28, 2011 Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: "Klaviertrios" (Audite)

Viele Ensembles haben diese Werke gespielt; und schlecht klingen sie schonMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Viele Ensembles haben diese Werke gespielt; und schlecht klingen sie schon

La Liberté | 12 février 2011 | EH | February 12, 2011 L’INSPIRATION PUISSANTE DU TRIO AVEC PIANO

Difficile de résumer la musique de Mendelssohn, autant héritier de laMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Difficile de résumer la musique de Mendelssohn, autant héritier de la

Der Landbote | 27. Januar 2011 | Herbert Büttiker | January 27, 2011 Im innersten Zirkel

Das Klaviertrio ist neben dem Streichquartett die Nummer zwei derMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Klaviertrio ist neben dem Streichquartett die Nummer zwei der

Südkurier
Südkurier | Nr. 15 (20. Januar 2011) | Martin Preisser | January 20, 2011 Fiebrig-feuriger Mendelssohn

Das Schweizer Klaviertrio legt eine neue CD vor. Die CD macht den AnfangMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Schweizer Klaviertrio legt eine neue CD vor. Die CD macht den Anfang

Tagblatt Online | 11. Januar 2011 | Martin Preisser | January 11, 2011 Start mit Mendelssohn

Martin Lucas Staub, Sie haben eine neue Reihe von Klaviertrio-EinspielungenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Martin Lucas Staub, Sie haben eine neue Reihe von Klaviertrio-Einspielungen

Thurgauer Zeitung | 11. Januar 2011 | Martin Preisser | January 11, 2011 Start mit Mendelssohn

Martin Lucas Straub, Sie haben eine neue Reihe vonMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Martin Lucas Straub, Sie haben eine neue Reihe von

Thurgauer Zeitung | 11. Januar 2011 | Martin Preisser | January 11, 2011 Schweizer Klaviertrio mit fiebrig-feurigem Mendelssohn

In letzter Zeit war das Schweizer Klaviertrio vor allem internationalMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
In letzter Zeit war das Schweizer Klaviertrio vor allem international

www.jazzstore.com | Mike D. Brownell | November 30, 2010

Composed in 1839 and 1845, respectively, the two mature piano trios ofMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Composed in 1839 and 1845, respectively, the two mature piano trios of

Merchant Infos

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Piano Trios
article number: 92.550
EAN barcode: 4022143925503
price group: ACX
release date: 28. January 2011
total time: 57 min.

News

date /
Typ
title
Rating
Jan 22, 2014
Award

Arkivmusic_recommendation - Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Piano Trios
Mar 21, 2011
Award

Supersonic - Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Piano Trios
Mar 5, 2012
Review

http://theclassicalreviewer.blogspot.de
Mendelssohn - a lightweight composer?
Sep 13, 2011
Review

International Record Review
That Schumann considered Mendelssohn to be a natural successor to Beethoven, and...
Aug 24, 2011
Review

Ensemble - Magazin für Kammermusik
Mit Spannung weiterhören
Aug 24, 2011
Review

www.jazzstore.com
Composed in 1839 and 1845, respectively, the two mature piano trios of Felix...
Apr 8, 2011
Review

www.ResMusica.com
Une lecture probe de Mendelssohn
May 19, 2011
Review

Fono Forum
Gar schön?
Sep 5, 2011
Review

Stereo
Klaviertrios Nr. 1 + 2
Apr 5, 2011
Review

Kulimu
Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: Klaviertrio Nr. 1 u. 2
Apr 13, 2011
Review

Westdeutsche Zeitung
Dynamisches Trio
Apr 4, 2011
Review

www.musicweb-international.com
Felix Mendelssohn
Apr 4, 2011
Review

Musik & Theater
Feinfasriger Mendelssohn
Mar 29, 2011
Review

Pizzicato
Ein Meisterstreich
Mar 17, 2011
Review

Crescendo
Swiss Piano Trio
Jan 3, 2011
Review

Kulturspiegel
Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: "Klaviertrios" (Audite)
Jan 3, 2011
Review

Spiegel online
Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy: "Klaviertrios" (Audite)
Feb 16, 2011
Review

La Liberté
L’INSPIRATION PUISSANTE DU TRIO AVEC PIANO
Feb 16, 2011
Review

Fanfare
My first reaction to receiving this release for review was, “Oh no, not...
Sep 2, 2011
Review

Thurgauer Zeitung
Start mit Mendelssohn
Jan 31, 2011
Review

Der Landbote
Im innersten Zirkel
Jan 26, 2011
Review

Südkurier
Fiebrig-feuriger Mendelssohn
Jan 26, 2011
Review

Thurgauer Zeitung
Schweizer Klaviertrio mit fiebrig-feurigem Mendelssohn
Jan 25, 2011
Review

Tagblatt Online
Start mit Mendelssohn

More from Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...