Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Sergei Prokofiev & Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 & Romeo and Juliet

92557 - Sergei Prokofiev & Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 & Romeo and Juliet

aud 92.557
Bitte Qualität wählen

Sergei Prokofiev & Pyotr Ilyich TchaikovskySymphony No. 5 & Romeo and Juliet

The Russian cultural scene, although largely unnoticed in the West, offers an almost inexhaustible potential in terms of first-class musicians and valuable interpretations. On the present SACD audite presents for the second time the Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra (NASO), an orchestra more...more

Sergei Prokofiev | Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

"Sanderling nobly balances the balletic with the dramatic impulses of this luscious score. Nice horn and tympani riffs from the poles of my listening space. The editing and sound production warrants our applause for the sonic warmth and lulling ambiance in the flute, horns, and strings." (www.audaud.com)

Multimedia

Informationen

The Russian cultural scene, although largely unnoticed in the West, offers an almost inexhaustible potential in terms of first-class musicians and valuable interpretations. On the present SACD audite presents for the second time the Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra (NASO), an orchestra more or less unknown in the West but nonetheless highly renowned: Could it be due to this region’s geographic remoteness and exoticness, or to the negative connotation of Siberia, that Russian musical culture ends with the Ural Mountains as far as the culturally interested West is concerned? Despite numerous concert tours and major successes in the West, this Siberian orchestra has remained largely unknown up until the present day. This is completely unjustified, for the NASO need not fear comparison with the best-known European orchestras.

Founded as long ago as 1956 in Novosibirsk as the result of a government decision to enliven Siberian cultural life, the Orchestra is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Arnold Kats was then appointed Music Director and has occupied this position uninterruptedly ever since. At first, alongside Novosibirsk, its concert activities were limited to cities in the eastern provinces of the former Soviet Union. Later on, concert organisers in the western Russian provinces discovered the Orchestra as well. Following successful performances in Moscow and Leningrad, the Orchestra undertook its first concert tour in the allied country of Bulgaria. Already in 1978, the Orchestra was permitted to undertake its first concert tour in the West – in Italy. Since then, numerous tours have regularly taken the orchestra to the great concert halls of the West European capitals and to Japan. Since 2002 Thomas Sanderling is the Permanent Guest Conductor of the orchestra.

Following the production of the Symphony No. 2 and the Caprice bohèmien by Sergei Rachmaninov with the NASO under Arnold Kats audite now releases a second SACD with this unique orchestra under Thomas Sanderling. Once again the orchestra is presented with a truly Russian repertoire: The beloved Fantasia-Ouverture “Romeo and Juliette” by Peter Tchaikovsky takes the listener to the world of the Shakespear-drama about love and hatred; the Symphony No. 5 by Sergei Prokofiev gives us an impression of the “new simplicity”, an idea promoted by the composer himself: rich melodic invention and rhythmic vitality with a colouration at once objectively hard and romantic are united to form a heroic monumental style.

In honour of the Orchestra’s 50th anniversary, audite presents a second production which attains the highest standards in interpretative and sound quality, motivating listeners to make further discoveries in the Russian musical scene.

Reviews

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | July 2007 | Victor Carr Jr | July 1, 2007

To say that Thomas Sanderling's new Prokofiev Symphony No. 5 recording isMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
To say that Thomas Sanderling's new Prokofiev Symphony No. 5 recording is

Fanfare | March/April 2007 | Peter J. Rabinowitz | March 1, 2007

Here’s a low-wattage performance of Prokofiev’s second-most-popular symphony, played with confidence by an orchestra that sounds (no surprise) asMehr lesen

Here’s a low-wattage performance of Prokofiev’s second-most-popular symphony, played with confidence by an orchestra that sounds (no surprise) as if it knows the music well. On the whole, Sanderling’s reading is slow—but it doesn’t bring the kind of heart-stopping anguish found in the even slower Bernstein/Israel PO performance. Rather, the tempo choices here give the music a laid-back quality, allowing us to soak it up without a sense of pressure—a temperate effect compounded by the washed-out colors (the lack of tang to the woodwind sound, the plump, cushioned sound of the lower brass), by the slightly casual treatment of rhythm (there’s not much snap, even in the second movement), and by the generally subdued climaxes (you won’t be shattered by the coda of the first movement).

Those who see the key to this work in its more corrosive elements will find it too tame—as, perhaps, will those who seek a more concentrated vein of lyricism. Certainly, in their different ways, Koussevitzky, Bernstein, Rozhdestvensky, Järvi, and (surprisingly) Tennstedt—to name just a few of the best who have taken up this music over the past six decades—all offer a consistently higher level of tension. Those for whom the Fifth points the way to The Tale of the Stone Mountain, however, may well find Sanderling’s moderation a welcome balm.

The middle-of-the-road Romeo is a bit less phlegmatic, but otherwise similar in outlook—you won’t find much edge in the fight music or much erotic pull in the love music, but the work holds together well and builds steadily through the final pages. The sound—converted to DSD from 44.1kHz/24 bit PCM originals—has an impressive ambience and depth, especially if you give the volume a bit of a boost.
Here’s a low-wattage performance of Prokofiev’s second-most-popular symphony, played with confidence by an orchestra that sounds (no surprise) as

Audiophile Audition
Audiophile Audition | February 2007 | Gary Lemco | February 13, 2007

The huge orchestral forces and diverse coloration of Prokofiev's FifthMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The huge orchestral forces and diverse coloration of Prokofiev's Fifth

Le Monde de la Musique
Le Monde de la Musique | Novembre 06 | Jean-Christophe Lemoine | November 1, 2006

Dans le premier mouvement (« Andante ») de la Symphonie n° 5 de Prokofiev, Thomas Sanderling cherche une voie médiane dans la polyphonie etMehr lesen

Dans le premier mouvement (« Andante ») de la Symphonie n° 5 de Prokofiev, Thomas Sanderling cherche une voie médiane dans la polyphonie et l'orchestration : ni épique (Karajan), ni démoniaque (Gennadi Rojdestvenski) L'Orchestre symphonique de Novossibirsk joue mezza voce ; timbres accommodants, projection minimale des thèmes, tout file doux. Cette patience paye, bien sûr : Sanderling bâtit par touches successives un discours très uni, ouaté même, dans le développement central. Dans l'« Allegro », pareil mimmalisme déconcerte : le travail est immense (attaques, continuité rythmique), mais le geste est si retenu et l'intention si peu avouée que l'élan se consume vite.

C'est la polyphonie que Thomas Sanderling recherche partout et qui l'amène à mettre l'expressivité sous le boisseau (au contraire d'un Rojdestvenski, qui les concilie). L'« Adagio » s'engage sur un tempo plus vif, puis s'élargit pour laisser s'épanouir la sonorité. Sanderling veut dompter la force de la partition pour en révéler le détail : immense ambition, mais le résultat semble plus scrupuleux que vraiment visionnaire. Le Roméo et Juliette de Tchaïkovski est pudique lui aussi, mais l'orchestration s'y prête et le lyrisme prend mieux.
Dans le premier mouvement (« Andante ») de la Symphonie n° 5 de Prokofiev, Thomas Sanderling cherche une voie médiane dans la polyphonie et

www.classicalcdreview.com
www.classicalcdreview.com | Ocotber 2006 | R.E.B. | October 1, 2006

Recently on this site we reviewed Audite's SACD of Rachmaninoff's SymphonyMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Recently on this site we reviewed Audite's SACD of Rachmaninoff's Symphony

Diapason
Diapason | Octobre 2006 | Christian Merlin | October 1, 2006

Thomas Sanderling a gardé des contacts privilégiés avec cette Russie dans laquelle son père s'était installé pour fuir le nazisme quand elleMehr lesen

Thomas Sanderling a gardé des contacts privilégiés avec cette Russie dans laquelle son père s'était installé pour fuir le nazisme quand elle était encore soviétique. Seulement voilà : quand le grand Kurt enregistrait avec le Philharmonique de Leningrad, ville où Thomas a grandi, le fils doit se contenter d'une phalange solide mais sans génie comme celle de Novosibirsk, orchestre sibérien auquel son chef Arnold Katz a donné un niveau plus qu'honorable sans jamais percer jusqu'à la classe A. Une bonne surprise n'est jamais exclue, et Thomas Sanderling nous en a déjà réservé au disque, que ce soit dans la 6e de Mahler ou en nous faisant découvrir des répertoires rares comme les symphonies de Karl Weigl, mais ici, la déception l'emporte.

On est bien disposé dans le premier mouvement de la Symphonie n° 5 de Prokofiev, construit avec une ampleur épique qui laisse se déployer le chant des cordes. L'enregistrement fait naître une impression d'espace, avec un beau respect des plans sonores, mais aussi plus d'architecture germanique que d'âpreté russe. La grandiose péroraison ne cloue pas l'auditeur à son fauteuil comme elle le devrait. Si le deuxième mouvement ne manque aucune intervention de la percussion, le ton n'est pas assez narquois, et les rythmes sont lisibles mais peu incisifs. On prend alors conscience que l'orchestre possède une discipline collective enviable, mais manque de finesse et de variété. D'excellente facture, la progression du mouvement lent est le meilleur moment du disque, le finale tombant dans une mollesse qui sera tout simplement rédhibitoire dans le Roméo et Juliette de Tchaïkovski, phrasé sans faute de goût mais sans nerf ni caractère, dépourvu de toute dramaturgie.
Thomas Sanderling a gardé des contacts privilégiés avec cette Russie dans laquelle son père s'était installé pour fuir le nazisme quand elle

www.classicstodayfrance.com
www.classicstodayfrance.com | Septembre 2006 | Christophe Huss | September 19, 2006

Déception et satisfaction. La satisfaction est de voir Audite maîtriserMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Déception et satisfaction. La satisfaction est de voir Audite maîtriser

opushd.net - opus haute définition e-magazine
opushd.net - opus haute définition e-magazine | Numéro 14 | Jean-Jacques Millo | September 4, 2006

Composée en 1944, alors que la guerre prenait un tournant décisif, grâceMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Composée en 1944, alors que la guerre prenait un tournant décisif, grâce

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | Sepetmber 2006 | Rémy Franck | September 1, 2006

Transparenz kann Musik abtöten. Doch das ist es nicht allein, was die Fünfte Prokofievs mit Sanderling so schlapp werden lässt: es fehlt ihr vorneMehr lesen

Transparenz kann Musik abtöten. Doch das ist es nicht allein, was die Fünfte Prokofievs mit Sanderling so schlapp werden lässt: es fehlt ihr vorne und hinten an Kraft und Atem. Und wenn die Fantasieouvertüre Romeo und Julia recht viel versprechend und insgesamt besser klingt als die Symphonie, so gibt es doch immer wieder Passagen, wo Nüchternheit in Langeweile umkippt.
Transparenz kann Musik abtöten. Doch das ist es nicht allein, was die Fünfte Prokofievs mit Sanderling so schlapp werden lässt: es fehlt ihr vorne

www.anaclase.com
www.anaclase.com | 9/2006 | Hervé Koenig | September 1, 2006

Contemporaine de la Huitième de Chostakovitch, la Symphonie en si bémolMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Contemporaine de la Huitième de Chostakovitch, la Symphonie en si bémol

Audio
Audio | 8/2006 | Otto P. Burkhardt | August 1, 2006

Das Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra (NASO) zeigt zum 50.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra (NASO) zeigt zum 50.

Zeitzeichen
Zeitzeichen | 7/2006 | Ralf Neite | July 1, 2006 Ins Herz
Prokofiev und Tschaikowsky begegnen sich in Novosibirsk

Es liegen 75 Jahre zwischen Tschaikowkys Fantasie-Ouvertüre „Romeo und Julia“ und Prokofievs fünfter Symphonie. 75 Jahre, in denen die Musik vonMehr lesen

Es liegen 75 Jahre zwischen Tschaikowkys Fantasie-Ouvertüre „Romeo und Julia“ und Prokofievs fünfter Symphonie. 75 Jahre, in denen die Musik von Grund auf revolutioniert wurde: Tschaikowsky zählte noch zu den Romantikern, Prokofiev wandelte bereits in den Fußstapfen des Avantgardismus, den die Neue Wiener Schule ins Rollen gebracht hatte. Und doch fällt bei oberflächlichem Hören der Zeitsprung zwischen den beiden Werken für einen Moment kaum auf: Tschaikowskys Ouvertüre schließt wie selbstverständlich an das Finale von Prokofievs fünfter Symphonie an. Ein faszinierender Querbezug tut sich auf.

Zu verdanken ist er Thomas Sanderling und dem Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra, kurz NASO, die die Komponisten auf einer CD vereinigt haben. Wer, wenn nicht Sanderling, wäre in der Lage, so tief in die russische Seele einzutauchen, dass dieser musikalische Zusammenschluss ganz natürlich und organisch wirkt? Sanderling, Absolvent des Konservatoriums in Leningrad, Leiter internationaler Opern- und Symphonieorchester (und seit 2002 ständiger Gastdirigent des NASO), hat bereits die deutschen Erstaufführungen der 13. und 14. Symphonie Dmitri Schostakowitschs dirigieren dürfen. Auch hatte er die Stabführung bei der Ersteinspielung von Schostakowitschs letztem Werk, der Michelangelo-Suite.

Mit dem sibirischen Orchester lotet Sanderling den ganzen Reichtum der letzten Schaffensphase Prokofievs aus. Russische Tradition und klassizistische Opulenz begegnen einem immer wieder nüchternen, dabei kraftvollen Ton. 1943, ein Jahr vor der Schaffung der fünften Symphonie, hatte Prokofiev in der Zeitung Istwestija über das Komponieren geschrieben: „Die Schreibweise muss klar und einfach, aber nicht schablonenhaft sein. Die Einfachheit darf nicht die alte Einfachheit, sondern muss eine neue sein.“ Klar, aber nicht schablonenhaft, selbst in den monumentalen Passagen: So klingt das Werk auch hier bei Sanderling und dem NASO.

Tschaikowskys leiser Einstieg in die Ouvertüre „Romeo und Julia“ wirkt nun wie ein zarter Nachgesang auf das zuvor Gehörte. Dort, wo Prokofiev auf spröde Kontrastwirkungen zielt, bevorzugt Tschaikowsky einen lustvollen, Klang. Wenn Prokofiev die Bläser herausstellt, vertraut Tschaikowsky auf die Pracht der Streicher. Doch beide treffen sich in der Genauigkeit ihrer dramatischen Zuspitzung. Und während man dem Verklingen Romeos und Julias nachlauscht, schwingen unterbewusst noch Prokofievs Melodien nach. Gemeinsam treffen sie ins Herz.
Es liegen 75 Jahre zwischen Tschaikowkys Fantasie-Ouvertüre „Romeo und Julia“ und Prokofievs fünfter Symphonie. 75 Jahre, in denen die Musik von

www.new-classics.co.uk
www.new-classics.co.uk | June 2006 | John Pitt | June 22, 2006

Mily Balakirev, one of the ‘Mighty Five’ amateur Russian composers of the mid-eithteenth century, encouraged Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to write aMehr lesen

Mily Balakirev, one of the ‘Mighty Five’ amateur Russian composers of the mid-eithteenth century, encouraged Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to write a piece based on Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, knowing that Tchaikovsky had recently emerged from his infatuation with a Belgian soprano named Désirée Artôt. Balakirev continued to make suggestions about the work throughout the ten years before the final version was published in 1880. Described as an ‘Overture-Fantasy’ by its composer, the overall design is a symphonic poem in sonata-form with an introduction and an epilogue. The work has become one of the most popular in the classical repertoire and its passionate love theme has been used in many movies, including Wayne's World. Sergei Prokofiev’s monumental Fifth Symphony was premiered in 1945 in the Great Hall of Moscow Conservatory by the USSR State Symphony Orchestra conducted by the composer himself. The Red Army had announced its victory in the war a few minutes before the premiere, so the heroic spirit of the work fitted perfectly. The music was a great success at its premiere and remains one of Prokofiev’s most popular works. This rewarding SACD release features fine performances of both these fine Russian works by the Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra, directed by its permanent guest conductor, Thomas Sanderling. Founded by the government in 1956 to enliven Siberian cultural life, this orchestra has subsequently aquired an increasingly international reputation, giving concert tours throughout Western Europe and Japan.
Mily Balakirev, one of the ‘Mighty Five’ amateur Russian composers of the mid-eithteenth century, encouraged Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to write a

Deutschlandfunk
Deutschlandfunk | 25. Mai 2006, 09:10 - 09:30 Uhr | Simone Wien, Sylvia Systermans | May 25, 2006

Nowosibirsk liegt im Zentrum Westsibiriens. Mit 1,5 Millionen Einwohnern nach Moskau und St. Petersburg die drittgrößte und eine der jüngstenMehr lesen

Nowosibirsk liegt im Zentrum Westsibiriens. Mit 1,5 Millionen Einwohnern nach Moskau und St. Petersburg die drittgrößte und eine der jüngsten Millionenstädte Russlands – gleichzeitig mit mehreren Theatern, Museen und einem großen Konzerthaus das kulturelle Zentrum Sibiriens. Hier ist das Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra Zuhause, das trotz weltweiter Konzertreisen anders als etwa die traditionsreichen St. Petersburger Philharmoniker bei uns immer noch erstaunlich unbekannt ist. Zu Unrecht, wie gleich zwei Einspielungen beweisen, die aus Anlass seines 50-jährigen Bestehens in diesen Wochen bei dem Label „audite“ erschienen sind. Die erste Aufnahme mit Werken von Sergej Rachmaninow leitete der Gründer und Chefdirigent des Orchesters Arnold Kats. Werke von Prokofjew und Tschaikowsky spielte das Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra unter Thomas Sanderling ein, seit 2002 ständiger Gastdirigent des Orchesters. Eine ausgesprochen farbenprächtige Reise durch russische Klanglandschaften, zu der ich Sie gerne einladen möchte. Am Mikrophon begrüßt Sie Sylvia Systermans.

[Musikbeispiel: 1’18’’, Sinfonie Nr.2 e-Moll op.27, vierter Satz, Allegro vivace von Sergej Rachmaninow]

Der Beginn des vierten Satzes, Allegro vivace aus der zweiten Sinfonie von Sergej Rachmaninow in einer Einspielung mit dem Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra.

Seine Gründung verdankt das Orchester einem Regierungsbeschluss aus dem Jahr 1956 „zur Belebung des sibirischen Kulturlebens“. Unter seinem künstlerischen Leiter der ersten Stunde, Arnold Kats, Professor am staatlichen Konservatorium in Novosibirsk und Gastdirigent von Orchestern wie dem Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam und dem Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, entwickelte es sich rasch zu einem erstklassigen Klangkörper. Konzerttourneen führten zunächst durch die ehemalige Sowjetunion und 1978 zur ersten Reise ins westliche Ausland. Heute kann sich das Orchester über 5000 Konzerte auf die Fahne schreiben, darunter Auftritte in Frankreich, Deutschland, Spanien, Österreich, Japan und in der Schweiz. Seinen Erfolg verdankt das Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra sicher nicht zuletzt seinem angenehm dunkel timbrierten Klang, wie er sich vor allem im düster verhaltenen Grollen der Pauken und dem geheimnisvollen Solo der Klarinette zu Beginn der Caprice Bohèmien von Rachmaninow entfaltet.

[Musikbeispiel: 4’43’’, Caprice bohèmien op.12 (4’56’’ – 6’40’’) von Sergej Rachmaninow]

Das Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Arnold Kats, mit dem Beginn der Caprice bohèmien op.12 von Sergej Rachmaninow.

Als ständiger Gastdirigent steht seit 2002 Thomas Sanderling am Pult des sibirischen Orchesters. Sanderling begann seine Karriere bereits im Alter von 24 Jahren als Musikdirektor an der Oper in Halle. Nach seiner Übersiedelung in den Westen 1983 dirigierte er u.a. an der Deutschen Oper Berlin und der Finnischen Nationaloper. Dmitrij Schostakowitsch beauftragte ihn mit den ostdeutschen Erstaufführungen seiner 13. und 14. Sinfonie und mit der Weltersteinspielung seines letzten Orchesterwerks, der Michelangelo Suite. Womit sich vielleicht am direktesten die Brücke zu seinem Vater Kurt Sanderling schlagen lässt, einem der sicher tiefgründigsten Schostakowitsch-Interpreten des 20. Jahrhunderts.

Das Potential des hervorragenden Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra bringt Thomas Sanderling auf seine Weise zum Tragen: mit ausgreifenden, aber nie unvermittelt gesetzten dynamischen Kontrasten und stringenten Tempi, die auch in den temperamentvoll pulsierenden Passagen des zweiten Satzes Allegro marcato aus Prokofjews fünfter Sinfonie B-Dur op.100 nicht ins Wanken geraten. Präzise artikulierte, in der Höhe strahlend helle Streicher und hervorragend intonierte Bläser überzeugen auch hier, in diesem effektvoll instrumentierten Werk von Prokofjew.

[Musikbeispiel: 2’50’’, Sinfonie Nr.5 B-Dur op.100, zweiter Satz, Allegro marcato (0’00’’ – 6’03’’), Sergej Prokofjew]

Das Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra unter Thomas Sanderling mit einem Ausschnitt aus dem zweiten Satz der fünften Sinfonie von Sergej Prokofjew.

Zum fast volkstümlichen Tonfall seiner fünften Sinfonie ließ sich Prokofjew möglicherweise von seinem Ballett „Romeo und Julia“ inspirieren. Aber nicht nur Prokofjew, auch Peter Tschaikowsky diente das Shakespearesche Drama als Vorlage für eines seiner erfolgreichsten Orchesterwerke, seine Fantasie-Ouvertüre „Romeo und Julia“, aus der ich Ihnen zum Abschluss der „neuen Platte“ noch einen Ausschnitt vorstellen möchte: das Allegro-Thema, mit seiner hämmernden Rhythmik Symbol der beiden verfeindeten Familien-Clans und die darauf folgende lyrische Melodie, Symbol der beiden Liebenden. Vielleicht eine der schönsten melodischen Erfindungen in der russischen Instrumentalmusik, die das Orchester mit großer Innigkeit, aber ohne überladene pathetische Geste intoniert.

[Musikbeispiel: 5’33’’, Fantasie-Ouvertüre Romeo und Julia o. Op. (5’45’’ – 11’12’’), Peter Tschaikowsky]

Die neue Platte – heute mit zwei Einspielungen des Novosibirsk Academic Symphony Orchestra, die in diesen Wochen bei dem Label audite erschienen sind. Die Einspielung der Fantasie-Ouvertüre Romeo und Julia von Peter Tschaikowsky, aus der Sie zuletzt einen Ausschnitt hörten, dirigierte Thomas Sanderling. Ihnen noch einen schönen Feiertag wünscht an dieser Stelle Sylvia Systermans.
Nowosibirsk liegt im Zentrum Westsibiriens. Mit 1,5 Millionen Einwohnern nach Moskau und St. Petersburg die drittgrößte und eine der jüngsten

Merchant Infos

Sergei Prokofiev & Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 & Romeo and Juliet
article number: 92.557
EAN barcode: 4022143925572
price group: ACX
release date: 1. June 2006
total time: 66 min.

More from these Composers

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...