Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Igor Stravinsky & Dmitri Shostakovich: Works for Violin and Piano

92576 - Igor Stravinsky & Dmitri Shostakovich: Works for Violin and Piano

aud 92.576
Bitte Qualität wählen

Igor Stravinsky & Dmitri ShostakovichWorks for Violin and Piano

Judith Ingolfsson and Vladimir Stoupel embark upon a challenging programme: two masterworks of twentieth century chamber music by Igor Stravinsky and Dmitri Shostakovich whose characteristics could not be more disparate.more

Igor Stravinsky | Dmitri Shostakovich

Judith Ingolfsson and Vladimir Stoupel embark upon a challenging programme: two masterworks of twentieth century chamber music by Igor Stravinsky and Dmitri Shostakovich whose characteristics could not be more disparate.

Track List

Please choose the preferred audio format:
Stereo
Surround
Quality

StravinskyDivertimento Judith Ingolfsson | Vladimir Stoupel

ShostakovichSonata for violin and piano, Op. 134 Judith Ingolfsson | Vladimir Stoupel

Informationen

The Divertimento for violin and piano by Igor Stravinsky, written in 1932 as an arrangement of his ballet Le Baiser de la Fée, and the sonata for violin and piano by Dmitri Shostakovich, composed in 1968 on the occasion of David Oistrakh’s 60th birthday, could hardly be more disparate: Stravinsky’s work is a spirited homage to Tchaikovsky, based on songs and piano pieces by that composer, whereas the Shostakovich is a profound and mysterious contribution to the genre of the violin sonata. Both works, however, share a preference for an allegorical and deeply mysterious idiom and symbolism which, in Stravinsky’s case, results in brilliant, but also cool, “music on music”, whereas Shostakovich’s piece appears as a form of internal biography. For interpreters performing both pieces for one disc or in the same concert, one of the main challenges and attractions of this combination lies in tracing the cultural, musical and political experiences and values shared by both composers. In this performance, Judith Ingolfsson and Vladimir Stoupel have accomplished that task with mastery.

Reviews

Heilbronner Stimme | Donnerstag, 13.September 2012 | Uwe Grosser | September 13, 2012 Natürlichkeit

Das Ergebnis ist faszinierend, weil hier eine Natürlichkeit im Spiel vorherrscht, die die Komposition und nicht das Virtuosentum in den Mittelpunkt stellt. Hinzu kommt der exzellente Klang der CD, die Audite gemeinsam mit Deutschlandradio Kultur produziert hat. Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Ergebnis ist faszinierend, weil hier eine Natürlichkeit im Spiel vorherrscht, die die Komposition und nicht das Virtuosentum in den Mittelpunkt stellt. Hinzu kommt der exzellente Klang der CD, die Audite gemeinsam mit Deutschlandradio Kultur produziert hat.

www.arkivmusic.com
www.arkivmusic.com | 01.07.2012 | Robert Maxham | July 1, 2012

Violinist Judith Ingolffson finds great warmth in the lower registers ofMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Violinist Judith Ingolffson finds great warmth in the lower registers of

Neue Zürcher Zeitung
Neue Zürcher Zeitung | Nr. 143 (22.06.2012) | tsr | June 22, 2012 Tänzerisch und spröde

Kammermusik für Violine und Klavier hat bei Igor Strawinsky und DmitriMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Kammermusik für Violine und Klavier hat bei Igor Strawinsky und Dmitri

F. F. dabei
F. F. dabei | Nr. 10/2012 (05.-18.05.2012) | May 5, 2012 Strawinsky/Schostakowitsch: Divertimento & Violinsonate

Sie könnten kaum entgegengesetzter sein: das Divertimento für Violine undMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Sie könnten kaum entgegengesetzter sein: das Divertimento für Violine und

American Record Guide | 01.05.2012 | Joseph Magil | May 1, 2012

Now that Shostakovich’s Violin Sonata has entered the mainstream repertoire, a common interpretation of it has emerged. The timings of each movementMehr lesen

Now that Shostakovich’s Violin Sonata has entered the mainstream repertoire, a common interpretation of it has emerged. The timings of each movement in these two performances are only a few seconds apart, and the biggest difference is in the middle movement, where Ingolfsson and Stoupel clock in at 6:29 to Kutik and Bozarth’s 7:00. The conservatories and universities are probably teaching this sonata now, so a good, workable interpretation circulates from teacher to student, and from musician to musician through concerts, records, and radio. This is certainly not a bad thing. It establishes an interpretive “floor”, so to speak, that performers generally don’t sink beneath. Most of the music we hear is played in standard interpretations.

The Soviet-born Yevgeny Kutik is more sensitive to the oppressive mood of the Shostakovich sonata and makes many more well-considered nuances than Ingolfsson does. Listen to Ingolfsson’s expressionless playing in the second subject of I and compare it with Kutik’s more bumpy, angular phrasing. Still, the greatest Shostakovich Violin Sonata that I’ve ever heard remains the amazing performance by the young brother-sister duo of Sergei and Lusine Khachatryan (July/Aug 2008).

Ingolfsson’s playing in Stravinsky’s Divertimento is not much better. Just compare the opening bars of the Sinfonia with the magic spell chanted by Cho-Liang Lin and Andre- Michel Schub in their classic recording. This isn’t a bad interpretation, but it is pedestrian.

Alfred Schnittke’s Violin Sonata 1, written in 1963, is obviously cut from the same cloth as the Shostakovich. While Schnittke’s signature polystylism is especially evident in the hymnlike tune at the end of the Largo and the pop tune-like dance at the start of the finale, a dark mood prevails, with much acerbic humor, if this can even be called humor.

It is interesting that Kutik would program the two works by Joseph Achron in a program titled Sounds of Defiance—the famous Hebrew Melody of 1911 and the Hebrew Lullaby of 1913. Achron was born in Russia in 1886. He certainly must have been aware of the horrible pogroms. He left the Soviet Union in 1922, never to return. Arvo Part’s Mirror in the Mirror, written in 1978, is a minimalist work with a vaguely religious atmosphere.

This is the first time I have heard Kutik, and I hope it will not be the last. He is always thinking, always playing the music, not just the notes.
Now that Shostakovich’s Violin Sonata has entered the mainstream repertoire, a common interpretation of it has emerged. The timings of each movement

Record Geijutsu
Record Geijutsu | April 2012 | April 1, 2012

japanische Rezension siehe PDFMehr lesen

japanische Rezension siehe PDF
japanische Rezension siehe PDF

Das Orchester | 04/2012 | Werner Bodendorff | April 1, 2012

Zwei große russische Komponisten der „klassischen Moderne“, dieMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Zwei große russische Komponisten der „klassischen Moderne“, die

Platte 11 | 29.03.2012 | Heinz Gelking | March 29, 2012 Strawinski / Divertimento und Schostakowitsch / Violinsonate
Two contrasting 20th-century-pieces for violin and piano, excellently played and recorded.

Das Divertimento von Igor Strawinski und die Violinsonate von DmitriMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Divertimento von Igor Strawinski und die Violinsonate von Dmitri

Crescendo Magazine
Crescendo Magazine | 01.03.2012 | Bernard Postiau | March 1, 2012

Nous voici une fois encore devant un de ces innombrables disquesMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Nous voici une fois encore devant un de ces innombrables disques

The Strad
The Strad | March 2012 | Catherine Nelson | March 1, 2012 Powerful recordings of two highly different Russian violin works

Stravinsky's Divertimento is an arrangement of the music from his balletMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Stravinsky's Divertimento is an arrangement of the music from his ballet

Diverdi Magazin
Diverdi Magazin | marzo 2012 | Ignacio González Pintos | March 1, 2012 La extraña pareja
Obras para violín y piano de Stravinski y Shostakovich

Algo más que una diferencia generacional separa a Stravinsky de Shostakovich. El significado, tan dispar, de la obra de cada uno de ellos simbolizaMehr lesen

Algo más que una diferencia generacional separa a Stravinsky de Shostakovich. El significado, tan dispar, de la obra de cada uno de ellos simboliza la oposición entre lo ruso y lo soviético, entre el desapego y el compromiso, entre la ambición cosmopolita de la inconfundible voz impersonal de Stravinsky y la fidelidad al entorno de un Shostakovich siempre portavoz del mismo, sea éste individual o colectivo. Pero este registro Audite, un SACD magníficamente grabado, empareja a estos dos autores más para acercarlos que para oponerlos. La obra de Stravinsky, arreglo para violín y piano del ballet El beso del hada, es fiel ejemplo de la estética del compositor. Música brillante, estilizada y pulcra, cuya vocación anti-romántica cuida los sentidos y rechaza el discurso emocional en favor de un diseño ingenioso que plantea un sutil desafío al oyente, quien debe localizar en la obra las citas, las referencias, los guiños, que en este caso remiten a Tchaikovsky. Ingolfsson y Stoupel brindan un festival sonoro a la altura del ingenio de Stravinsky: la variedad de humores, colores, ataques, acentos y sonoridades encuentra en la pareja una respuesta exquisita y exacta – qué maravilla de Danzas Suizas. Decía Krzysztof Meyer que en la Sonata Op. 134 aparece un Shostakovich desconocido, en referencia a "la frialdad intelectual, la reserva emocional y la rigidez de sonido" que, en su opinión, caracterizan la obra. Ingolfsson y Stoupel parecen compartir el aserto hallando así el hilo conductor entre las dos piezas programadas. Sin abandonar la pureza de sonido nos sumergen en la densidad y el desasosiego de la obra – tremenda la ejecución del dramático Allegretto-, dibujando el doliente diagrama musical sin llegar a hacer suyo el sufrimiento, mostrando antes que padeciendo. Es ese pudor, esa última reserva lo que, por un instante, logra enlazar dos mundos irreconciliables.
Algo más que una diferencia generacional separa a Stravinsky de Shostakovich. El significado, tan dispar, de la obra de cada uno de ellos simboliza

Gramophone
Gramophone | March 2012 | John Warrack | March 1, 2012 Stuttgart professor explores parallels from two Russians

Though the booklet-note writer declares that between Stravinsky and Shostakovich there is a “disparity in the conception of musical art which couldMehr lesen

Though the booklet-note writer declares that between Stravinsky and Shostakovich there is a “disparity in the conception of musical art which could not be greater”, they actually share qualities that make this a fascinating record. One is the love of dance rhythms.

It is obvious in the use of some of Tchaikovsky's songs and piano pieces for Stravinsky's Divertimento based on his ballet The Fairy's Kiss, and it is again strongly present in the klezmer-like Allegretto of Shostakovich's powerful Sonata; all seized upon with great brio here, as they need to be. There is also the invocation of earlier composers, with Stravinsky's exuberant Tchaikovsky transformations and with Shostakovich's profound homages to Bach.

Ingolfsson and Stoupel draw the Bach inspiration out in the deceptively straightforward opening Andante and in the long Largo finale to Shostakovich's Sonata, a marvelous, haunting piece of extended musical thought which is handled with superb control. There is also a less readily identifiable but very Russian sense of energy in the more vigorous dance music, which can seem to be on the verge of breaking out of control, especially in the Shostakovich's central movement. Both composers also respond to the inspiration of bell sounds, something again very Russian and vividly invoked here.

These are both strong, perceptive performances, recorded closely and lucidly, in which the complicated ambiguities in the music of both composers take hold powerfully below the sometimes jaunty surface.
Though the booklet-note writer declares that between Stravinsky and Shostakovich there is a “disparity in the conception of musical art which could

Audiophile Audition
Audiophile Audition | February 28, 2012 | Steven E. Ritter | February 28, 2012 Stravinsky: Divertimento; Shostakovich: Violin Sonata – Vladimir Stoupel, p./ Judith Ingolfsson, v. – Audite
Two wildly divergent faces of Russian composition

The Ice Maiden by Hans Christian Andersen served as the storyline fodderMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The Ice Maiden by Hans Christian Andersen served as the storyline fodder

BBC Radio 3
BBC Radio 3 | 11. February 2012 | Helen Wallace and Andrew McGregor | February 11, 2012 BROADCAST CD review

Our next recital, Shostakovich and Stravinsky with Judith Ingolfsson and Vladimir Stoupel, is an unusual combination. It is a brave thing to put theMehr lesen

Our next recital, Shostakovich and Stravinsky with Judith Ingolfsson and Vladimir Stoupel, is an unusual combination. It is a brave thing to put the two works together, but it is really illuminating. I think the ambiguity of both works comes through by putting them next to each other. What I love about Judith Ingolfsson is that she has this really sensual penetrating tone, and it brings out the Tchaikovsky behind the Stravinsky in the Divertimento, which is based on the ballet “Le baiser de la fée”. She brings Tchaikovsky back to life with this very sensual approach and it works fantastically. So many people treat Stravinsky performances rather cool and dry, but she goes the opposite way and it really pays dividends…

[Stravinsky Divertimento, Sinfonia excerpt]

They found the right combination – it is light and witty, but there is still that darkness and weight to it as well. There is a very strong sense of powerful personalities coming through. They play the very witty and sparkly “pas de deux” with aplomb, but there is a real edge to their playing. That edge comes out in the Shostakovich – I really feel that they have these reserves to draw on which you need with Shostakovich. The dark undertones in this piece are not hidden at all. It is brooding, and it has got anguish. It is a great big structure as well. They go down into the depths of this piece and they get that great spiral structure very beautifully worked out in the last movement. We are going to hear from that slow final movement an excerpt where the violin starts with that very veiled vulnerable sound and then moves up a gear into something very intense.

[Shostakovich Sonata, excerpt from the 3rd movement]

This really is a “take no prisoners” approach – the way they build to that climax. They have a very real, dark, Russian feel to this piece and there is a compelling sense of an unfolding narrative. I was very convinced by this – the unity of the structure they really achieved – that, they realized that beautifully. It is incredibly impressive and it is a great combination with the Stravinsky.
Our next recital, Shostakovich and Stravinsky with Judith Ingolfsson and Vladimir Stoupel, is an unusual combination. It is a brave thing to put the

Ensemble - Magazin für Kammermusik
Ensemble - Magazin für Kammermusik | 1-2012 Februar / März | Carsten Dürer | February 1, 2012 Große Phrasierungsideen

Zwei der großen russischen Kammermusikwerke des 20. Jahrhunderts habenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Zwei der großen russischen Kammermusikwerke des 20. Jahrhunderts haben

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | Februar 2012 | Clemens Haustein | February 1, 2012 Komponierte Leere

Unterschiedlicher könnten zwei Stücke einer CD nicht sein. Hier Strawinskys lustig-nostalgisches Divertimento; da Schostakowitschs Violinsonate op.Mehr lesen

Unterschiedlicher könnten zwei Stücke einer CD nicht sein. Hier Strawinskys lustig-nostalgisches Divertimento; da Schostakowitschs Violinsonate op. 134, in der sich die Musik fast permanent an der Grenze zum Verstummen befindet. Beide Komponisten haben kaum mehr gemein, als dass sie beide in Russland geboren sind. Schostakowitsch blieb in der Sowjetunion und durchlebte die Untiefen des Stalinismus, Strawinsky wanderte früh nach Frankreich aus und wurde in den USA zum gemachten Mann.

Schostakowitschs Sonate von 1968 wirkt nach Strawinskys Tschaikowsky-Adaption – für das Divertimento griff Strawinsky auf sein Ballett "Kuss der Fee" zurück, in dem er Musik Tschaikowskys verwendete – wie ein Schock. Schostakowitschs Musik ist so ausgedünnt, bewegt sich in so trostloser Zweistimmigkeit fort, dass man schon von komponierter Leere sprechen kann.

Eine Leere, die den Interpreten seltsamerweise ein Höchstmaß an Kraft und Konzentration abverlangt: Wo die kompositorischen Mittel so reduziert sind, wird das Musizieren zur Meditation. In diesem Sinn schaffen Judith Ingolfsson (Violine) und Vladimir Stoupel (Klavier) eine Einspielung, die Melancholie spüren lässt und dennoch den letzten Zugang zur musikalischen Leere Schostakowitschs schuldig bleibt. Vielleicht liegt das Problem im relativ langsamen Tempo von Eingangs- und Schlusssatz, das Ingolfsson und Stoupel nicht mit Intensität füllen können. Svjatoslav Richter und Igor Oistrach gehen da im Mitschnitt der Uraufführung wesentlich unkomplizierter zu Werke. Vielleicht hätte im Gegenzug Strawinskys Divertimento weniger Intensität gutgetan: Ingolfsson spielt vor allem den Tschaikowsky-Aspekt des Werkes aus und vergisst dabei den kühlen Ton des Neoklassizismus.
Unterschiedlicher könnten zwei Stücke einer CD nicht sein. Hier Strawinskys lustig-nostalgisches Divertimento; da Schostakowitschs Violinsonate op.

RBB Kulturradio
RBB Kulturradio | Mo 02.01.2012 | Ulrike Klobes | January 2, 2012 Strawinsky: Divertimento und Schostakowitsch: Violinsonate

Zwei große kammermusikalische Werke der russischen Moderne haben die Geigerin Judith Ingolfsson und der Pianist Vladimir Stoupel neu eingespielt: DasMehr lesen

Zwei große kammermusikalische Werke der russischen Moderne haben die Geigerin Judith Ingolfsson und der Pianist Vladimir Stoupel neu eingespielt: Das Divertimento von Igor Strawinsky und die Violinsonate von Dmitri Schostakowitsch.

Judith Ingolfsson – ein Name, den man sich merken sollte
Bereits mit 14 studierte die gebürtige Isländerin am Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia bei Jascha Brodsky, der schon so manchem Geiger zu Weltruhm verholfen hat. Mittlerweile unterrichtet Ingolfssen, neben ihrer Konzerttätigkeit, selbst als Geigenprofessorin in Stuttgart. Mit Vladimir Stoupel, einem russischstämmigen Pianisten, hat sie schon sehr oft zusammengespielt. Was die beiden verbindet, ist ihre Vorliebe für die Musik des 20 Jahrhunderts.

Zwei gegensätzliche Meisterstücke der russischen Moderne
Strawinskys Divertimento kann getrost als heitere Hommage an Peter Tschaikowsky verstanden werden. Zunächst stellte Strawinsky Salonlieder und Klavierstücke von Tschaikowsky zu dem Ballett „Der Kuss der Fee“ zusammen. Der Geiger Samuel Dushkin, der auch schon Strawinskys Violinkonzert in Amerika uraufgeführt hatte, brachte ihn 1932/33 auf die Idee, eine Besetzung für Violine und Klavier zu schreiben. Und so entsprechen die vier Sätze des Divertimentos genau den Szenen des Balletts: eine raffinierte und witzige Verwebung von Tschaikowsky-Themen, ganz im neoklassizistischen Strawinsky-Stil.
Schostakowitschs Violinsonate ist um einiges jünger, 1968 für David Oistrach geschrieben, kommt sie sehr viel spannungsgeladener, gedämpfter und fast ein wenig karg daher.

Virtuos und entschlossen
Gewissenhaft und trotzdem mit großer Leichtigkeit präsentieren Judith Ingolfsson und Vladimir Stoupel die beiden Werke. Ihr Strawinsky überzeugt vor allem durch die virtuose Herausarbeitung der lyrischen Melodien. Die Schostakowitsch-Sonate spielen sie ein wenig langsamer als gewohnt, was dem Stück aber durchaus gut tut. Judith Ingolfsson legt sich wirklich hinein in die lang gehaltenen Töne, so dass ein warmer, entschlossener und manchmal auch angriffslustiger Klang entsteht. Gleichzeitig kann sie sich an den leiseren Stellen wunderbar zurücknehmen, bis hin zum sachten, einfühlsamen Pianissimo.

Auch Vladimir Stoupel erweist sich als Kenner seiner beiden Landsmänner, solide liefert er die Grundlage für die Ausflüge der Violine: Ein glasklares Zusammenspiel mit einem sicheren Gespür für die feinen Verästelungen und großen Gegensätze, die beide Werke gemeinsam haben.
Zwei große kammermusikalische Werke der russischen Moderne haben die Geigerin Judith Ingolfsson und der Pianist Vladimir Stoupel neu eingespielt: Das

Audio
Audio | 1/2012 | AF | January 1, 2012

Zunächst ist man einfach nur hingerissen von dem glasklaren, detailreichMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Zunächst ist man einfach nur hingerissen von dem glasklaren, detailreich

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | N° 219 - 1/2012 | Guy Engels | January 1, 2012 Zum Bersten spannend

Mit seinem Divertimento griff Igor Strawinsky die klassische Tradition eines Haydn oder Mozart auf. Er machte das mit der ihm eigenen, starkMehr lesen

Mit seinem Divertimento griff Igor Strawinsky die klassische Tradition eines Haydn oder Mozart auf. Er machte das mit der ihm eigenen, stark rhythmisierten Tonsprache, mit der uns diese Aufnahme zu allererst packt. Das Duo Ingolfsson-Stoupel spielt höchst kommunikativ, nimmt die Zuhörer mit auf eine spannende musikalische Zeitreise. Judith Ingolfsson entlockt ihrer Violine eine schier unbegrenzte Palette an Tönen – hier und da filigran und sanft, dann wiederum kraftvoll, energiegeladen. Dabei lässt das Duo nie die hintergründige, humoristische Note des Genres vermissen.

Dmitri Shostakovich hat die Violinsonate op. 134 in seinen letzten Lebensjahren geschrieben, Jahre, die vom körperlichen Verfall des Komponisten gezeichnet sind. Selbst wenn man das Werk nicht zu sehr biographisch deuten sollte, ist der Abgesang an das Leben nicht zu überhören. Mit bestechender Rhetorik arbeiten Judith Ingolfsson und Vladimir Stoupel die recht morbide Stimmung des Werkes heraus. Sie gestalten die Sonate scharf und pointiert im Allegretto, mit schicksalhafter Wucht und einem regelrechten Gewitter an Emotionen im abschließenden Largo.
Mit seinem Divertimento griff Igor Strawinsky die klassische Tradition eines Haydn oder Mozart auf. Er machte das mit der ihm eigenen, stark

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | January 2012 | MC | January 1, 2012

Ingolfsson inhabits the balletic world of Stravinsky with as much commitment as the hermetic space of Shostakovich. There are some strange recordingMehr lesen

Ingolfsson inhabits the balletic world of Stravinsky with as much commitment as the hermetic space of Shostakovich. There are some strange recording perspectives.
Ingolfsson inhabits the balletic world of Stravinsky with as much commitment as the hermetic space of Shostakovich. There are some strange recording

Hessischer Rundfunk
Hessischer Rundfunk | hr2-Kultur: Der CD-Tipp, Mittwoch, 28.12.2011, 13.05-13.30 Uhr | Niels Kaiser | December 28, 2011 CD-Tipp

Es begrüßt Sie ganz herzlich Niels Kaiser. Unsere heutige CD stellt anMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Es begrüßt Sie ganz herzlich Niels Kaiser. Unsere heutige CD stellt an

Gesellschaft Freunde der Künste | 19.12.2011 | December 19, 2011 Widmen sich zwei Meisterwerken der Kammermusik
Konzert/Musik Klassik: Strawinsky Divertimento & Schostakowitsch Violinsonate mit Judith Ingolfsson (Violine) und Vladimir Stoupel am Klavier

Das Divertimento für Violine und Klavier von Igor Strawinsky, entstanden 1932 als Bearbeitung seines Balletts Der Kuss der Fee, und die Sonate fürMehr lesen

Das Divertimento für Violine und Klavier von Igor Strawinsky, entstanden 1932 als Bearbeitung seines Balletts Der Kuss der Fee, und die Sonate für Violine und Klavier von Dimitri Schostakowitsch, komponiert 1968 anlässlich des 60. Geburtstags von David Oistrach, könnten kaum entgegengesetzter sein:
Bei Strawinskys Werk handelt es sich um eine geistvolle Hommage von Salonliedern und Klavierstücken Tschaikowskys, bei Schostakowitsch dagegen um einen tiefsinnigen und rätselhaften Beitrag zur Gattung der Violinsonate. Beiden Werken ist jedoch die Vorliebe für eine allegorische bzw. tief verrätselte Klangsprache und -symbolik gemeinsam, die im Falle Strawinskys zu einer glanzvollen, aber auch kühlen „Musik über Musik“ führt, bei Schostakowitsch dagegen zu einer Art innerer Biografie. Die Herausforderung und der Reiz für Interpreten, diese beiden Stücke auf einer SACD oder im selben Konzert miteinander zu konfrontieren, besteht nicht zuletzt darin, gemeinsamen kulturellen, musikalischen und politischen Erfahrungen und Werten beider Komponisten nachzuspüren, wie es Judith Ingolfsson und Vladimir Stoupel in der vorliegenden Einspielung meisterhaft gelungen ist.
Das Divertimento für Violine und Klavier von Igor Strawinsky, entstanden 1932 als Bearbeitung seines Balletts Der Kuss der Fee, und die Sonate für

klassik.com | 19.12.2011 | Sophia Gustorff | December 19, 2011 | source: http://magazin.k... Selbstbewusst und souverän

So sehen Sieger aus. Zumindest stellt man sie sich so vor: Der Pianist mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
So sehen Sieger aus. Zumindest stellt man sie sich so vor: Der Pianist mit

www.ResMusica.com
www.ResMusica.com | 28 novembre 2011 | Nicolas Derny | November 28, 2011 Leçon de musique russe par Judith Ingolfsson et Vladimir Stoupel

Il est des cas où l’ «arrangement» (et tout ce qui y est assimilé deMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Il est des cas où l’ «arrangement» (et tout ce qui y est assimilé de

Fanfare | 18.06.2012 | Robert Maxham

Violinist Judith Ingolffson finds great warmth in the lower registers of her 1750 Lorenzo Guadagnini violin for the Sinfonia of Igor Stravinsky’sMehr lesen

Violinist Judith Ingolffson finds great warmth in the lower registers of her 1750 Lorenzo Guadagnini violin for the Sinfonia of Igor Stravinsky’s Divertimento, but she also delivers its jagged rhythmic passages with cocky incisiveness—a brashness that strops a comparably sharp edge on her reading of the second movement (“Danses suisses”). The third provides her, as well as her sympathetic collaborator, pianist Vladimir Stoupel, with an opportunity to blend lyricism with slashing figuration, a challenge they meet with a combination of wit and verve. The last movement (or might it also be Audite’s engineers?) displays the unalloyed silver of her instrument’s upper registers—as well of course, as the purity of her tone production—in its cantabile sections.

The contrast of an almost metallic brightness with shadows, and shadowy dimness streaked only occasionally by light, that the two works offer, of course, allows Ingolfsson to draw upon the correspondingly contrasting sides of her musical personality, her tone production, and the capabilities of her instrument; all three respond to the challenges of Dmitri Shostakovich’s late work. It seems to be a tough sell; even dedicatee David Oistrakh, who recorded the sonata with Sviatoslav Richter (Mobile Fidelity MFCD 909, presumably no longer available), and who set a very high standard, hardly popularized the piece. Ingolffson and Stoupel play with reserved puckishness in the first movement (so did Leila Josefowicz, whose performance with John Novacek on Warner, 2564 62997-2 I very strongly recommended in Fanfare , 30:2, preferring it to the reading by Oistrakh’s own student Lydia Mordkovich on Chandos 8988), and they hack and slash their way aggressively through the second movement’s thickets of irony. Ingolffson sounds particularly commanding as she dispatches the movement’s difficulties, and the engineers have captured the dynamic range of the instruments in the most tumultuous sections. By contrast, they set the pizzicato statement of the final movement’s passacaglia theme and the first variations in a very subdued light, which remains through the movement.

In Fanfare 26:5, I noted that Ilya Grubert’s performance on Channel Classics 16398 lacked, in its last movement, Oistrakh’s “depth of reflection.” I also thought that his reading of the second movement hardly matched “both the last measure of Oistrakh’s fervor and the caustic bite of his pessimism.” Could that be said of Ingolfsson’s reading of the finale as well? However Ingolfsson stands in relation to Oistrakh, however, she demonstrates probing insight into the sonata—as she does into Stravinsky’s pastiche, and her pairing of them deserves a strong recommendation.
Violinist Judith Ingolffson finds great warmth in the lower registers of her 1750 Lorenzo Guadagnini violin for the Sinfonia of Igor Stravinsky’s

Merchant Infos

Igor Stravinsky & Dmitri Shostakovich: Works for Violin and Piano
article number: 92.576
EAN barcode: 4022143925763
price group: ACX
release date: 9. December 2011
total time: 54 min.

More from these Composers

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...