Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 4

92683 - Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 4

aud 92.683
Bitte Qualität wählen

Ludwig van BeethovenComplete String Quartets - Vol. 4

An early and a late string quartet by Ludwig van Beethoven: during the intervening twenty-six years, the composer had turned the traditional understanding of music on its head. In the fourth volume of their recording series of the complete Beethoven String Quartets, the Quartetto di Cremona demonstrate not only the stylistic quantum leap, but also Beethoven’s enormous demands on the musicians’ concentration and technique: a chamber music event.more

Ludwig van Beethoven

"Restlessness, feverish romanticism and emotional force characterize the Beethoven performances by Quartetto di Cremona. The four Italians are deeply penetrating the composer’s musical thoughts and several times kind of an emotional quake brings the music into ebullition." (Pizzicato)

Multimedia

Informationen

For the fourth time, the Quartetto di Cremona embark on a journey of the almost impervious cosmos of Ludwig van Beethoven's String Quartets. This time, they have chosen two works forming a portal within the quartet writing of this composer who had made Vienna his home. Beethoven had opened his Op. 18 set with the Quartet in F major, written in 1798/99 at the behest of his patron and friend, Prince Lobkowicz. Despite the mellifluous, pastoral key, the music draws a long line from the brilliantly crafted first and last movements to the dark hues of the Adagio, apparently inspired by the tomb scene from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. Even within the framework of the traditional form, Beethoven's quartet début achieves a maximum of moods and stylistic variety.

Beethoven's Quartet Op. 131 of 1826, generally perceived as a peak within his chamber music, is entirely different. It was written in the shadows of the Ninth Symphony and the Missa solemnis, but appears much more eccentric and "experimental" than these two large-scale works. Seven sections of diverse tone and character are played without breaks in between; a brooding fugue stands alongside a sensitive adagio, a folk tune presto is next to a restless finale. The work was written for the Viennese violinist Ignaz Schuppanzigh, whose quartet set the professional playing standard for the following hundred years. Schuppanzigh rehearsed Beethoven's Op. 131 painstakingly - without him this music, which was deemed not only unplayable but also "unhearable" by contemporaries, would not exist.

Reviews

deropernfreund.de | 24.8.2017 | Egon Bezold | August 24, 2017 Edle kammermusikalische Kost

Das Spiel der Cremona Truppe ist von respektgebietender Einheitlichkeit, angefangen von der Wahl der Tempi und Phrasierung bis hin zur akkurat dosierten Behandlung und Nutzung des Bogens. Was die formale Beherrschung und Klarheit der Durchzeichnung betrifft, verdient die Spielkultur des Quartetto di Cremona großes Lob. [...] Hier verbinden sich ein leidenschaftlich-emotionaler Ansatz mit romantisch geprägten Elementen sowie italienischer klanglicher Ästhetik. Da verschmelzen Struktur, Ausdruck und Form zur glühenden inneren Leidenschaft.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Spiel der Cremona Truppe ist von respektgebietender Einheitlichkeit, angefangen von der Wahl der Tempi und Phrasierung bis hin zur akkurat dosierten Behandlung und Nutzung des Bogens. Was die formale Beherrschung und Klarheit der Durchzeichnung betrifft, verdient die Spielkultur des Quartetto di Cremona großes Lob. [...] Hier verbinden sich ein leidenschaftlich-emotionaler Ansatz mit romantisch geprägten Elementen sowie italienischer klanglicher Ästhetik. Da verschmelzen Struktur, Ausdruck und Form zur glühenden inneren Leidenschaft.

American Record Guide | November 2015 | Greg Pagel | November 1, 2015

I get to review Beethoven quartets almost every issue. As much as I lament the fact that great ensembles too seldom record unfamiliar or contemporaryMehr lesen

I get to review Beethoven quartets almost every issue. As much as I lament the fact that great ensembles too seldom record unfamiliar or contemporary repertoire, I almost always find these releases a treat. Each new reading, even if it’s mediocre, reveals new possibilities.

The Cremona Quartet has never disappointed me. I reviewed their release of Quartets 6, 11, and 16 (Sept/Oct 2013). I thought it was very good, and this one is even better. Their approach to Beethoven seems to be expressive, but straightforward and never overplayed. Most of my recordings of Op. 18 are either too delicate or too romantic, but Cremona comes pretty close to the bull’s eye. Their interpretation is crisp, yet robust. 1:I is a little quicker here than on any of my other recordings, but the tempo gives it a lilt that I don’t think I’ve heard elsewhere.

I also enjoy their reading of Quartet 14. Here, too, they play in a way that is very direct, but not dry. The tempos are again quick, and listeners might miss the weariness often heard in late Beethoven. For that, go with the Italiano, whose slow movements in particular are praised in our overview of the Beethoven Quartets (Nov/Dec 2006). If you’re looking for clarity, though, the Cremona would be hard to beat. They allow the work to unfold slowly and naturally, without any interpretive excess.

The Elias Quartet’s approach to Beethoven is the opposite of the Cremona’s. They are too romantic. In Quartet 4 many details are exaggerated, and the music feels quite bogged down. Accents are overdone, and there are many unnecessary pauses. Also, there is a lot of sliding and scooping. There is even more of this in Quartet 13. In general, they simply seem to be pushing too hard. This way of playing might work for Brahms. I’d like to hear this group play something else, because they are creative and technically skilled and have a rich sound. But I cannot recommend this.
I get to review Beethoven quartets almost every issue. As much as I lament the fact that great ensembles too seldom record unfamiliar or contemporary

Musica | N° 269 Settembre 2015 | Stefano Pagliantini | September 1, 2015

Il suono dei quattro strumenti, catturato magistralmente con un grado di dettaglio di sorprendente vividezza, ha poi una compattezza e una bellezza degna dei maggiori complessi oggi in circolazione.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Il suono dei quattro strumenti, catturato magistralmente con un grado di dettaglio di sorprendente vividezza, ha poi una compattezza e una bellezza degna dei maggiori complessi oggi in circolazione.

klassik.com | 31.08.2015 | Sonja Jüschke | August 31, 2015 | source: http://magazin.k... Überzeugend auf ganzer Linie

Die Einspielung ist insgesamt sehr gut gelungen, der bereits sehr positive erste Höreindruck hat sich auch nach mehrmaligem Hören aufs Neue bestätigt. Wer tatsächlich noch keine Aufnahme von Beethovens Streichquartetten hat, sollte definitiv diese SACD-Reihe in die Auswahl mit einbeziehen.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Einspielung ist insgesamt sehr gut gelungen, der bereits sehr positive erste Höreindruck hat sich auch nach mehrmaligem Hören aufs Neue bestätigt. Wer tatsächlich noch keine Aufnahme von Beethovens Streichquartetten hat, sollte definitiv diese SACD-Reihe in die Auswahl mit einbeziehen.

http://wrti.org | Jul 31, 2015 | Joe Patti & Jill Pasternak | July 31, 2015 | source: http://wrti.org/... Quartetto di Cremona: Tailor-Made Music from Italy

[...] according to Strad Magazine, the Quartetto di Cremona is "...as sleek and elegant as an Armani suit.” And it's true. [...] Jill speaks with the Quartet's violist, Simone Gramaglia, about their latest CD on the Audite labelMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
[...] according to Strad Magazine, the Quartetto di Cremona is "...as sleek and elegant as an Armani suit.” And it's true. [...] Jill speaks with the Quartet's violist, Simone Gramaglia, about their latest CD on the Audite label

Musica | N° 268 Luglio-Agusto 2015 | Piero Rattalino | July 1, 2015

Il Quartetto di Cremona ci riesce, in sostanza, e riesce anche a equilibrare i passaggi dal sublime al popolaresco al bizzarro che rendono così singolare, specie poiché si tratta del terzultimo, il Quartetto op. 131.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Il Quartetto di Cremona ci riesce, in sostanza, e riesce anche a equilibrare i passaggi dal sublime al popolaresco al bizzarro che rendono così singolare, specie poiché si tratta del terzultimo, il Quartetto op. 131.

Stereo
Stereo | 7/2015 Juli | Marcus Stäbler | July 1, 2015

Die Streicher aus der Welthauptstadt des Geigenbaus gehen [...] mit einem (typisch italienischen ?) Temperament zur Sache, das den Hörer unmittelbar packt. Umwerfend, wie sich die vier im eröffnenden Allegro gegenseitig befeuern. Im Gesang des anschließenden Adagio sind dann die Leidenschaft und Ergriffenheit, die Beethoven mit der Vortragsbezeichnung „affettuoso ed appassionato“ einfordert, so deutlich zu spüren wie in nur wenigen Einspielungen.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Streicher aus der Welthauptstadt des Geigenbaus gehen [...] mit einem (typisch italienischen ?) Temperament zur Sache, das den Hörer unmittelbar packt. Umwerfend, wie sich die vier im eröffnenden Allegro gegenseitig befeuern. Im Gesang des anschließenden Adagio sind dann die Leidenschaft und Ergriffenheit, die Beethoven mit der Vortragsbezeichnung „affettuoso ed appassionato“ einfordert, so deutlich zu spüren wie in nur wenigen Einspielungen.

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | July 2015 | Misha Donat | July 1, 2015

Here's some tremendously accomplished playing in two works from opposite ends of Beethoven's career as a composer of string quartets. The scurryingMehr lesen

Here's some tremendously accomplished playing in two works from opposite ends of Beethoven's career as a composer of string quartets. The scurrying triplets in the finale of the first of the Op. 18 quartets, for instance, are articulated with remarkable clarity, and the tricky violin writing in the trio of the same work's scherzo is dispatched with admirable fluency. At the other end of the scale, in the long variation movement that forms the expressive heart of the late C sharp minor Quartet Op. 131, the individual phrases of the initial theme are handed over from one violin to the other with admirable tenderness, and the players find just the right caressing tone for the third variation, which Beethoven wanted performed lusinghiero ('flatteringly').

There are moments when the players' approach to the music can seem a little larger than life: the sforzato accents in the central section of the slow movement of Op. 18 No. I – one of the great tragic utterances among Beethoven's earlier works – sound like pistol shots; and the same marking in the subject of the slow opening fugue of Op. 131 is again exaggerated, disrupting the music's tranquil mood to an unnecessary degree. If these are faults, however, they are faults in the right direction. Curiously enough, given the players' propensity for dramatisation, Op. 131's second movement sounds rather easygoing for its 'Allegro molto vivace' marking. But these are compelling accounts, and this fourth volume in the Quartetto di Cremona's Beethoven cycle can confidently be recommended.
Here's some tremendously accomplished playing in two works from opposite ends of Beethoven's career as a composer of string quartets. The scurrying

hifi & records
hifi & records | 3/2015 | Uwe Steiner | July 1, 2015

[...] mich überzeugt die beglückende Musikalität dieser Interpretationen. Auch aufnahmetechnisch hochklassig!Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
[...] mich überzeugt die beglückende Musikalität dieser Interpretationen. Auch aufnahmetechnisch hochklassig!

Audiophile Audition
Audiophile Audition | June 28, 2015 | Gary Lemco | June 28, 2015

Some twenty-six years separate the composition of the two Beethoven stringMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Some twenty-six years separate the composition of the two Beethoven string

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | Juni 2015 | Marcus Stäbler | June 1, 2015

Die frühen Beethoven-Quartette wirken in manchen Aufnahmen – gerade im Vergleich mit den mittleren und späten Werken – noch ein bisschen brav.Mehr lesen

Die frühen Beethoven-Quartette wirken in manchen Aufnahmen – gerade im Vergleich mit den mittleren und späten Werken – noch ein bisschen brav. Nicht so beim Quartetto di Cremona. Die Streicher aus der Welthauptstadt des Geigenbaus gehen im Quartett op. 18,1 mit einem (typisch italienischen?) Temperament zur Sache, das den Hörer unmittelbar packt. Umwerfend, wie sich die Vier im eröffnenden Allegro gegenseitig befeuern. Im Gesang des anschließenden Adagio sind dann die Leidenschaft und Ergriffenheit, die Beethoven mit der Vortragsbezeichnung „affettuoso ed appassionato“ einfordert, so deutlich zu spüren wie in nur wenigen Einspielungen.

Das 26 Jahre später entstandene cis-Moll-Quartett op. 131 kommt aus einer ganz anderen Sphäre. Hier hat Beethoven die Formen der klassischen Tradition längst hinter sich gelassen und eine Tonsprache geschaffen, die bis heute nichts von ihrer eigenwilligen, mitunter widerborstigen Rätselkraft verloren hat. Viele Musikhistoriker und Interpreten haben immer wieder den vermeintlich abstrakten und weltabgewandten Charakter des Spätwerks hervorgehoben. Das Quartetto di Cremona rückt die Musik dagegen in ein sehr menschliches Licht. Auch im cis-Moll-Quartett steht der Ausdruck für die vier Italiener im Vordergrund. Das zeigen sie etwa mit ihrer expressiven Wärme, die den eröffnenden Fugensatz ebenso beseelt wie die Variationenfolge im zentralen Andante, aber auch mit der Leidenschaft, die das ganze Finale vorantreibt wie in einem Höllenritt. Auch ein Komponist, der sein Gehör verloren hat, bleibt ein Mensch aus Fleisch und Blut: So lautet die zentrale und überzeugende Botschaft des Cremoneser Ensembles zu Beethoven, die in der vierten Folge der Gesamtaufnahme besonders deutlich zutage tritt und auch klangtechnisch, wie gewohnt, sehr klar übermittelt wird.
Die frühen Beethoven-Quartette wirken in manchen Aufnahmen – gerade im Vergleich mit den mittleren und späten Werken – noch ein bisschen brav.

Gramophone
Gramophone | June 2015 | Peter Quantrill | May 25, 2015

Audite’s recording is close if not claustrophobic, close enough to differentiate the character of the four Italian instruments as well as theirMehr lesen

Audite’s recording is close if not claustrophobic, close enough to differentiate the character of the four Italian instruments as well as their players—the 20th-century viola and cello are more reticent if more timbrally even than the Amati and Testore instruments used by the violinists. The microphones catch both the leader’s sniff and the rather wide and slow vibrato he uses in general; I prefer the pure tone employed by him and his colleagues to chilling effect in the Adagio of Op 18 No 1, which is invested with an unusual depth of expression. The dramatic silences are given full measure around Eroica-like intensifications of the main theme’s second half at the movement’s climax, and the players don’t let the tension slacken with a sentimental rallentando but bend the coda with discreet portamento.

Right from the subtle play with Beethoven’s opening gambit—first tentative, then more assured, like a guest at the door putting their party face on—this is a performance that moves with purpose and takes care over the small things. Both the Scherzo and its Trio push on relentlessly—it’s a small room for a busy party and the guests are inclined to talk to your face—with plenty of buzz from the cellist as he lays into a point. The confrontational tonal profile of the quartet is more obviously suited to the abrupt contrasts of Op 131. The stabbing accents of the opening Adagio would cut deeper at a lower dynamic level, and throughout there is a lack of really quiet, inward playing, even in the central Andante. Accordingly the finale is a first cousin to the Grosse Fuge, raw and impressively provisional.
Audite’s recording is close if not claustrophobic, close enough to differentiate the character of the four Italian instruments as well as their

www.classicalcdreview.com
www.classicalcdreview.com | May 2015 | R.E.B. | May 1, 2015

Again the high performance standards are ever apparent, Audite engineers have provided a perfectly natural audio picture. Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Again the high performance standards are ever apparent, Audite engineers have provided a perfectly natural audio picture.

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | 28/04/2015 | Guy Engels | April 28, 2015 Emotionaler Wellenritt

Der mögliche Einbruch bleibt aus. Das ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ hat den langen Atem, weicht nicht von seiner kompromisslosen, aufwühlenden,Mehr lesen

Der mögliche Einbruch bleibt aus. Das ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ hat den langen Atem, weicht nicht von seiner kompromisslosen, aufwühlenden, packenden Lektüre der Beethoven-Quartette ab. Diesmal haben die vier Musiker das frühe F-Dur-Quartett und das späte cis-Moll-Quartett miteinander konfrontiert. Die zeitliche, vor allem aber die künstlerische Distanz zwischen Opus 18 und Opus 131 ist nicht zu überhören. Dennoch bleibt ihnen eines gemein: die Beethovensche Unrast, die fiebrige Romantik, die emotionale Unwucht. In Opus 18 mag das wohl noch etwas klassisch ummantelt sein. Vor allem der lyrische 2. Satz enthält manche Reminiszenzen an Haydn. Aber auch da setzt das ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ immer wieder Ausrufezeichen, bricht aus dem wiegenden, wohlgeformten Duktus aus – wie ein Ausbruch aus einem wohlbehüteten Leben, ein Aufbruch zu neuen Ufern. Das Spiel der Cremoneser bleibt immer griffig, zupackend – auch im leichtfüßig und transparent vorgetragenen Schlussallegro.

Opus 131 unterscheidet sich vom Frühwerk schon allein durch die reifere Anlage, durch Beethovens tiefes Durchdringen musikalischer Gedanken, mit denen die Interpreten vollauf im Einklang sind. Dem brillanten Klang im Andante stellen sie in den schnellen Ecksätzen ein vulkanisches Aufbäumen entgegen, ein emotionales Beben, bei dem sich die tiefen Streicher im 7. Satz an einem seelischen Abgrund bewegen. Dem Sog dieser Interpretationen kann man sich kaum entziehen.

Restlessness, feverish romanticism and emotional force characterize the Beethoven performances by Quartetto di Cremona. The four Italians are deeply penetrating the composer’s musical thoughts and several times kind of an emotional quake brings the music into ebullition.
Der mögliche Einbruch bleibt aus. Das ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ hat den langen Atem, weicht nicht von seiner kompromisslosen, aufwühlenden,

The Herald Scotland | Sunday 26 April 2015 | Michael Tumelty | April 26, 2015

This fourth volume in the Quartetto di Cremona's ongoing Beethoven cycle, even by these great players' well-established standards, is astounding. [...] This gripping Cremona cycle goes from strength to strength.<br /> Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
This fourth volume in the Quartetto di Cremona's ongoing Beethoven cycle, even by these great players' well-established standards, is astounding. [...] This gripping Cremona cycle goes from strength to strength.

Sémele - boletín de novedades discográficas de música clásic | abril de 2015 | April 1, 2015

El cuarto volumen de los cuartetos de Beethoven por el Quartetto di Cremona pone en diálogo dos obras muy contrastadas: un cuarteto temprano y otroMehr lesen

El cuarto volumen de los cuartetos de Beethoven por el Quartetto di Cremona pone en diálogo dos obras muy contrastadas: un cuarteto temprano y otro tardío del maestro de Bonn cuya distancia en el tiempo – 27 años median entre uno y otro – refleja no sólo el drástico cambio de estilo que experimentó el lenguaje beethoveniano como producto de una renovación consciente de los procedimientos tradicionales, sino también la diferencia entre las lógicas exigencias técnicas que los demarcan.
El cuarto volumen de los cuartetos de Beethoven por el Quartetto di Cremona pone en diálogo dos obras muy contrastadas: un cuarteto temprano y otro

Der neue Merker
Der neue Merker | April 2015 | Dr. Ingobert Waltenberger | April 1, 2015 AUDITE: Das Quartetto di Cremona spielt Beethovens Streichquartette wie einst das Alban Berg Quartett
Das soeben veröffentlichte Vol. IV wartet mit Referenzeinspielungen der Quartette Op. 18 Nr. 1 und Op. 131 Nr. 14 auf

Die vier Herren aus Cremona erweisen mit ihrer Neueinspielung Reverenz an ihre alten Kollegen. Cristiano Gualco gelingt auf seiner Amati aus 1640 genau dieser expressive gesangliche Ton, dessen unter die Haut gehende Schönheit auch den späten Beethoven wunderbar hörbar macht. [...] Die musikalischen Bälle werden einander traumwandlerisch sicher zugeworfen, das eruptiv spontane Musizieren ist voller Innenspannung, Aufbäumen und Hinsinken. Meisterlich!Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die vier Herren aus Cremona erweisen mit ihrer Neueinspielung Reverenz an ihre alten Kollegen. Cristiano Gualco gelingt auf seiner Amati aus 1640 genau dieser expressive gesangliche Ton, dessen unter die Haut gehende Schönheit auch den späten Beethoven wunderbar hörbar macht. [...] Die musikalischen Bälle werden einander traumwandlerisch sicher zugeworfen, das eruptiv spontane Musizieren ist voller Innenspannung, Aufbäumen und Hinsinken. Meisterlich!

www.myclassicalnotes.com | Wednesday | 03.25.15 | Hank Zauderer | March 25, 2015 Cremona Quartet

The performers are a fairly young Italian group. They play with strong emotion and fine feeling.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The performers are a fairly young Italian group. They play with strong emotion and fine feeling.

www.klassikerleben.de | März 2015 | Oliver Buslau | March 20, 2015

Wie schon in den vorangegangenen Folgen zeigt das Quartett aus Cremona einen von Leidenschaft und Technik gespeisten eigenen Zugang.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Wie schon in den vorangegangenen Folgen zeigt das Quartett aus Cremona einen von Leidenschaft und Technik gespeisten eigenen Zugang.

Merchant Infos

Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 4
article number: 92.683
EAN barcode: 4022143926838
price group: ACX
release date: 20. March 2015
total time: 67 min.

More from Ludwig van Beethoven

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...