Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 6

92685 - Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 6

aud 92.685
Bitte Qualität wählen

Ludwig van BeethovenComplete String Quartets - Vol. 6

Once more, an early and a late work provide insight into Beethoven’s startling development. Both pieces reveal how Beethoven incorporated folk music into his own works – in all other aspects, the styles of these two string quartets could not be more different.more

Ludwig van Beethoven

"[...] such warm playing; such perfection on a silver disc; what a glory this is." (The Herald Scotland)

Informationen

Beethoven's startling development: An early and a late work provide insight

​Early and late - with Beethoven this always implies developing questions and expanding compositional ideas. In the case of the works recorded here, the A major Quartet from the Op. 18 set and the B-flat major Quartet, Op. 130, the focus is on folk music and its integration into art music: a recurring, central subject for the composers of "Viennese Classicism" which also guaranteed general accessibility to their music. The variations on a simple theme in the Andante of the Quartet Op. 18 No. 5 represent such a case of looking towards popular music, as also does the "Alla danza tedesca" from the late Quartet Op. 130, where the rhythm and character of the good old German dance is alienated to such an extent that it seems to appear as a damaged recollection, more than as an actual dance.

In all other aspects, however, the styles of these two string quartets could not be more different. "Who would not remember the enthusiasm created by his first symphonies, his sonatas, his quartets", a contemporary wrote not long after Beethoven's death. "All music lovers were delighted to find, so soon after Mozart's death, a man emerge who promised to replace the sorely missed. But alas, albeit gradually, though increasingly, he departed from his initial path, insisted on cutting a new one, and finally went astray." This "going astray" is today considered the most fascinating late oeuvre in musical history, to be experienced here in passionate and painstaking interpretations by the Quartetto di Cremona as part of their recording of the complete Beethoven Quartets.

Reviews

deropernfreund.de | 24.8.2017 | Egon Bezold | August 24, 2017 Edle kammermusikalische Kost

Das Spiel der Cremona Truppe ist von respektgebietender Einheitlichkeit, angefangen von der Wahl der Tempi und Phrasierung bis hin zur akkurat dosierten Behandlung und Nutzung des Bogens. Was die formale Beherrschung und Klarheit der Durchzeichnung betrifft, verdient die Spielkultur des Quartetto di Cremona großes Lob. [...] Hier verbinden sich ein leidenschaftlich-emotionaler Ansatz mit romantisch geprägten Elementen sowie italienischer klanglicher Ästhetik. Da verschmelzen Struktur, Ausdruck und Form zur glühenden inneren Leidenschaft.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Spiel der Cremona Truppe ist von respektgebietender Einheitlichkeit, angefangen von der Wahl der Tempi und Phrasierung bis hin zur akkurat dosierten Behandlung und Nutzung des Bogens. Was die formale Beherrschung und Klarheit der Durchzeichnung betrifft, verdient die Spielkultur des Quartetto di Cremona großes Lob. [...] Hier verbinden sich ein leidenschaftlich-emotionaler Ansatz mit romantisch geprägten Elementen sowie italienischer klanglicher Ästhetik. Da verschmelzen Struktur, Ausdruck und Form zur glühenden inneren Leidenschaft.

American Record Guide | April 2017 | Paul L Althouse | April 1, 2017 | source: http://www.ameri...

This is Volume VI of the quartets from the Cremona. I reviewed Volumes II & III (M/J 2014, N/D 2014), and others have been covered by Greg Pagel. IMehr lesen

This is Volume VI of the quartets from the Cremona. I reviewed Volumes II & III (M/J 2014, N/D 2014), and others have been covered by Greg Pagel. I feel I have a good sense of this group. Their playing is generally bracing and clean, with fairly fast tempos. While they are not what anyone would call “inexpressive”, their approach tends to be straightforward, one might say youthful. Their performances of the early quartets (Op. 18) seem quite fine, and here in No. 5 (the A major) the crisp, off-the-string articulation in I is wonderfully light and Haydnesque. The finale is taken at a tempo that shows the Cremona’s technical expertise. The music doesn’t gain much from the blinding speed, so when I asked myself why they played at such a pace, I came up with this answer: because they could!

I’m less happy with Quartet 13 (B-flat, Op. 130). For me the short introduction to 1 should include an element of pain, of regret, of sadness, but here it seems too straight. The opening theme (repeated notes, then a leap up a fourth) certainly is on the positive side, but we find (mainly in the development) that the optimism is tinged with lots of questions and uncertainty. This emotional complexity, so important in late Beethoven, seems in short supply here. The middle movements go better. The presto is flown through, taking just over two minutes, but the scherzo (poco scherzoso) and German dance are lovely. The cavatina is plagued with poor balances; accompanying voices often overshadow the melody. The finale (not the Grosse Fuge) is also lightweight and nicely done.

The publicity for the Cremona likes to compare them to the Quartetto Italiano. They’re not there yet, but the earliest recordings of the Italiano were faster and more aggressive than the later ones we so much admire. Perhaps the same thing will happen with this group.
This is Volume VI of the quartets from the Cremona. I reviewed Volumes II & III (M/J 2014, N/D 2014), and others have been covered by Greg Pagel. I

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | January 2017 | Michael Tanner | January 1, 2017

This disc came as a disappointment after my extremely positive feelings about the earlier volumes in the Cremona Quartet's Beethoven series. I stillMehr lesen

This disc came as a disappointment after my extremely positive feelings about the earlier volumes in the Cremona Quartet's Beethoven series. I still find what they do is interesting and suggestive, but in the case of the B flat Quartet Op. 130 – the one which Beethoven himself found most moving, and which I normally do even though it isn't necessarily the greatest – I was puzzled.

First, however, they are well up to their usual standard in the exhilarating performance of the A major Quartet Op. 18 No. 5, with its wonderfully peremptory opening and its general air of a youthful genius in confident possession of his unique powers. The notes suggest a strong influence from Mozart's A major Quartet, but it is Haydn who springs immediately to mind with his perpetual surprises, many of them mischievous. The slow movement is especially enjoyable, with a routine theme followed by ever more inventive variations.

Unfortunately the Cremonas decided to play Op. 130 without the Grosse Fuge, the original finale much later described by Stravinsky as 'perpetually contemporary'. Its first audience found it incomprehensible and Beethoven wrote the substitute finale, which we hear here – the original finale is on Volume 3. To me the first five movements seem to demand it. What we do have is some unpleasantly bulging playing in the brief second movement and exaggerated lurchings in the fourth. Most disappointing and surprising of all is the prosaically played Cavatina, Beethoven's most intimate music, played considerably too fast and it would seem deliberately unexpressive. The edginess of the recording does not help. I have listened several times and I'm bewildered.
This disc came as a disappointment after my extremely positive feelings about the earlier volumes in the Cremona Quartet's Beethoven series. I still

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | November 2016 | Marcus Stäbler | November 1, 2016

Mit seinen Schnörkeln und Trillerfiguren gibt sich Beethovens frühes Quartett op. 18 Nr. 5 noch etwas neckischer, etwas rokokohafter als dieMehr lesen

Mit seinen Schnörkeln und Trillerfiguren gibt sich Beethovens frühes Quartett op. 18 Nr. 5 noch etwas neckischer, etwas rokokohafter als die Schwesterwerke aus demselben Zyklus. Das Quartetto di Cremona spielt diese Momente mit spitzer Artikulation – und mischt so eine Prise Ironie in seine Interpretation.

Auch das Menuett beginnt noch ganz leicht und unschuldig; die Bögen scheinen zunächst über die Saiten zu schweben. Doch dann bricht der leichtfüßige Tanz mit einer rabiaten Geste ab. Wie ruppig die italienischen Streicher diese Passage in die Saiten bürsten, ist eines von vielen Beispielen für die Prägnanz, mit der sie die musikalischen Charaktere ausformen. Auch im abschließenden Finale des A-Dur-Quartetts, das in Beethovens original aberwitzigem Tempo wie aufgeschreckt wirkt, als würden die Motive hektisch durcheinanderwirbeln.

Hier deutet sich bereits Beethovens Neigung an, die Interpreten an die Grenzen des Machbaren zu treiben: wie auch und gerade im B-Dur-Quartett op. 130. Der Presto-Satz etwa ist ein echter Fingerbrecher für den ersten Geiger. Manche Ensembles schalten deshalb einen Gang zurück. Das Quartetto di Cremona spielt das Presto dagegen mit extra durchgedrücktem Gaspedal. Die drei unteren Stimmen scheinen die erste Geige im Mittelteil unerbittlich voranzuhetzen – dadurch entsteht eine mitreißende Energie, der man sich kaum entziehen kann.

Das Tempo wird zum Ausdruck einer Rastlosigkeit, die die Musik immer weitertreibt. Dieser Tanz auf dem Vulkan ist jedoch nur eine von vielen Facetten des Stücks. Einen denkbar starken Kontrast bildet die Cavatina, sicher einer der schönsten und deshalb auch berühmtesten Sätze aus Beethovens Quartettschaffen. Der erste Geiger Cristiano Gualco und seine Kollegen spielen diesen Satz sehr anrührend und ausdrucksvoll, mit einem wunderbar gedeckten Klang, bevor das Stück mit dem nachkomponierten Finale temperamentvoll endet. Auch mit der sechsten Folge hält das Quartetto di Cremona das Spitzenniveau seiner Gesamtaufnahme.
Mit seinen Schnörkeln und Trillerfiguren gibt sich Beethovens frühes Quartett op. 18 Nr. 5 noch etwas neckischer, etwas rokokohafter als die

Bayern 4 Klassik - CD-Tipp
Bayern 4 Klassik - CD-Tipp | 16.09.2016, 16.05 Uhr | Michael Schmidt | September 16, 2016 | source: http://www.ardme... BROADCAST CD-Tipp
Das Quartetto di Cremona spielt Beethoven

Sendebeleg siehe PDF!Mehr lesen

Sendebeleg siehe PDF!
Sendebeleg siehe PDF!

www.pizzicato.lu | 24/08/2016 | Guy Engels | August 24, 2016 | source: http://www.pizzi... Spannend bis zum Schluss

Die Beethoven-Reise des ‘Quartto di Cremona’ neigt sich ihrem Ende zu, die Spannung bleibt hingegen unvermindert hoch. Auch nach sechs EtappenMehr lesen

Die Beethoven-Reise des ‘Quartto di Cremona’ neigt sich ihrem Ende zu, die Spannung bleibt hingegen unvermindert hoch. Auch nach sechs Etappen verliert diese Gesamteinspielung nichts an ihrem Reiz, an der hohen Dichte interpretatorischen Könnens. Die vier Musiker erreichen einen Grad wortloser Kommunikation, der kaum noch zu übersteigen ist. Nur so können sie derart unverkrampft an Beethovens Musik herangehen, die vor allem im Opus 18 immer vorwärts drängt, in der sich der widerspenstige junge Komponist schon deutlich bemerkbar macht. Die Noten vibrieren in allen Saiten, Ecken und Kanten bleiben wissentlich ungeschliffen.

Im Impetus gleich, in der Sprache allerdings forscher begegnen wir dem Bonner Meister anschließend in Opus 130. Das ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ lässt uns die Musik noch wesentlich intensiver erleben, sie wirkt schroff und zerklüftet, dann aber wiederum zart und intim. Selten zuvor haben wir die Cavatine derart rein und packend gehört, mit diesem leisen, wehmütigen Unterton. Ein Leben in Musik, das Beethoven gerade in der Schlusstrias seiner Streichquartette verdichtet hat und das kaum packender in Szene gesetzt werden kann, als dies das ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ macht.

Compelling, highly communicative and vibrant performances showing the great talent of the four musicians forming one of Italy’s best quartets, Quartetto di Cremona.
Die Beethoven-Reise des ‘Quartto di Cremona’ neigt sich ihrem Ende zu, die Spannung bleibt hingegen unvermindert hoch. Auch nach sechs Etappen

www.myclassicalnotes.com | August 20, 2016 | Hank Zauderer | August 20, 2016 | source: http://www.mycla... Late and Early Beethoven

I am a huge fan of Beethoven’s chamber music. And recordings that combineMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
I am a huge fan of Beethoven’s chamber music. And recordings that combine

Sunday Times
Sunday Times | 15.08.2016 | SP | August 15, 2016

Op. 130 is a masterpiece – tough, poignant, charming, even a touch sentimental. It’s played with freshness and immediacy.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Op. 130 is a masterpiece – tough, poignant, charming, even a touch sentimental. It’s played with freshness and immediacy.

The Herald Scotland | 29 Jul 2016 | Michael Tumelty | July 29, 2016 | source: http://www.heral...

such warm playing; such perfection on a silver disc; what a glory this is.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
such warm playing; such perfection on a silver disc; what a glory this is.

www.europadisc.co.uk | 22.07.2016 | July 22, 2016 | source: http://www.europ...

The recorded sound is intimate but never dry, serving the performances faithfully yet unobtrusively. Those who have been following this excellent modern cycle will snap the disc up immediately: for those who haven’t, this is as fine a place to start as any, and will have you hooked in no time.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The recorded sound is intimate but never dry, serving the performances faithfully yet unobtrusively. Those who have been following this excellent modern cycle will snap the disc up immediately: for those who haven’t, this is as fine a place to start as any, and will have you hooked in no time.

The Herald Scotland | 16 Jul 2016 | Michael Tumelty | July 16, 2016 | source: http://m.heralds... Quartetto di Cremona's special way with Beethoven

[...] the Cremona Quartet are their own men, with their own sound, their own approach and their own style. And, in a world that is positively crawling with string quartets (where do they all come from, and how do they breed?) the Quartetto di Cremona, to my mind and perception, are just about the top of the heap.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
[...] the Cremona Quartet are their own men, with their own sound, their own approach and their own style. And, in a world that is positively crawling with string quartets (where do they all come from, and how do they breed?) the Quartetto di Cremona, to my mind and perception, are just about the top of the heap.

Rheinische Post
Rheinische Post | 13. Juli 2016 | Wolfram Goertz | July 13, 2016 Wer soll das alles hören?

Täglich erscheinen Berge von neuen Klassik-CDs. Wir haben ins volle Töneleben gegriffen und gelauscht. Bei einigen Platten fragt man sich, ob esMehr lesen

Täglich erscheinen Berge von neuen Klassik-CDs. Wir haben ins volle Töneleben gegriffen und gelauscht. Bei einigen Platten fragt man sich, ob es Hörer für sie gibt. Oft macht man aber unerwartete und nicht selten schöne Entdeckungen.

Die Welt der Schallplatten schmeckt nicht nur nach Austern und Kaviar. Es will auch Schwarzbrot gegessen werden. Aber das kann ausgesprochen köstlich sein.

Im Laufe eines Jahres erscheinen einige wenige Hochpreisprodukte der Stars und unendlich viele Platten, deren Interpreten oder Komponisten man nie im Leben gehört hat oder denen man ein öffentliches Interesse an ihnen nur mit Mühe unterstellen darf – nennen wir nur mal das "Weihnachtsoratorium" der Kantorei Stralsund oder die 4. Sinfonie e-Moll von Johannes Brahms des Orchestre Philharmonique de Clermont-Ferrand. Sind das wirklich nur belanglose Produkte, allenfalls für lokale Bedürfnisse gepresst, oder verbirgt sich dahinter die eine oder andere Kostbarkeit?

Um das zu prüfen, haben wir uns in einer beliebigen Auswahl die Platten angehört, die binnen eines Monats auf unserem Schreibtisch gelandet sind. Um das Ergebnis vorwegzunehmen: Es war viel Schönes und noch mehr Unerwartetes darunter. Nun der Reihe nach.

Das kleine Label: audite aus Detmold

Immer wenn ich eine Platte der Detmolder Firma audite bekommen, weiß ich: Das kann kein Schrott sein! Sie produzieren nicht wie die Karnickel, sondern mit Bedacht, und was aus dem Presswerk kommt, das kann man sich anhören. Die Frage ist halt nur, ob das auch Produkte für jedermann sind.

Im Fall der Neuaufnahme aller Streichquartette von Ludwig van Beethoven mit dem Quartetto di Cremona ist man zunächst unsicher, ob die Welt das braucht. Nach wenigen Takten ist dieses Gefühl wie weggepustet. Die vier Musiker lassen sich mit bewundernswerter Sicherheit auf den verschiedenen Alterssitzen des Komponisten Beethoven nieder. Im frühen A-Dur-Quartett aus Opus 18 erfreut die wunderbare Frische und Beschwingtheit, mit der die Musiker zu Werke gehen; im späten Streichquartett B-Dur op. 130 treffen sie die Aspekte eines fast schon bizarr klingenden Nachtschattengewächses atemberaubend sicher. Es gibt fraglos etliche hochrangige Einspielungen der Streichquartette Beethovens, trotzdem wird man mit dieser Aufnahme wirklich glücklich, zumal sie eine einleuchtende Konfrontation des späten mit dem jungen Beethoven bietet und uns auf die Fahndungsliste setzt, wie viel Revolutionäres auch schon im Frühwerk des Komponisten zu entdecken ist.

Ein Kaiser, der komponierte: Leopold I. schrieb ein "Requiem"

Im Gegensatz zu Beethoven ist – und das darf hier als Kalauer erlaubt sein – der Komponist Leopold I. eine wirkliche Entdeckung. Der 1640 in Wien als zweiter Sohn von Kaiser Ferdinand III. geborene Komponist war 1658 in Frankfurt zum Römischen Kaiser gekürt worden, doch seine 47-jährige Amtszeit bis zu seinem Tod im Jahr 1705 muss ausgesprochen unpolitisch gewesen sein. Leopold hatte es eher mit der Musik, mit Festlichkeiten, Religion und der Jagd, also mit weltlichen und spirituellen Genüssen. Dass er auch komponiert hat, dürften die wenigsten wissen.

Audite überrascht uns nun mit einer ausgewählten Sammlung von Kirchenmusik aus Leopolds Feder. Der ist natürlich kein Groß-, aber immerhin ein ansprechender Kleinmeister. Dass Leopold sich an große Formate wie ein "Stabat Mater" und ein "Requiem" wagte, darf man als den Versuch würdigen, mit den Kaisern der Tonkunst mitzuhalten. Dank vorbildlicher Interpreten wie Cappella Murensis und Les Cornets Noirs unter Leitung von Johannes Strobl darf das Ergebnis als gelungen gelten. Trotzdem würde ich mich wundern, wenn diese Platte in Nordrhein-Westfalen außer bei den eingefleischten Anhängern historischer Königshäuser mehr als zehn Mal über die Laden- beziehungsweise Internettheke geht.

Ebenfalls für historisch ausgerichtete Musikfreunde scheint eine CD vorgesehen zu sein, die an die Altistin Maureen Forrester (1933 bis 2010) erinnert. Sie war von Bruno Walter entdeckt worden und galt in ihren besten Jahren als grandiose Mahler-Interpretin. Das "Urlicht" auf Youtube ist eine Sensation. Jetzt bringt audite uns ausgewählte Liedaufnahmen (Mahler, Loewe, Wagner, Brahms, Schubert, Schumann, Britten und andere) – und man ist überwältigt vom flutenden Wohllaut einer imperialen Stimme.

[…] Dieses Ärgernis geigt man jedoch rasch wieder weg – und wieder mit dem Label audite: Franziska Pietsch und Detlev Eisinger bieten eine formidable Aufnahme der beiden bezaubernden und energetischen Prokofjew-Sonaten für Violine und Klavier.
Täglich erscheinen Berge von neuen Klassik-CDs. Wir haben ins volle Töneleben gegriffen und gelauscht. Bei einigen Platten fragt man sich, ob es

SWR
SWR | 04.03.2016 | Lotte Thaler | March 4, 2016 | source: http://www.swr.d... BROADCAST

[…] Auch die nächste Aufnahme ist Teil einer Serie. Das italienische Quartetto di Cremona hat bei Audite soeben die fünfte Folge seinerMehr lesen

[…] Auch die nächste Aufnahme ist Teil einer Serie. Das italienische Quartetto di Cremona hat bei Audite soeben die fünfte Folge seiner Gesamteinspielung der Streichquartette von Ludwig van Beethoven herausgebracht. Diese Fünfte ist auch insofern bemerkenswert, weil sie neben dem späten Quartett a-Moll op. 132 das Streichquintett op. 29 aus dem Jahr 1801 enthält. Da dieses Werk leider nur selten aufgeführt wird, möchte ich Ihnen den letzten Satz daraus vorstellen. Er ist echter Beethoven, tollkühn im rasenden Tempo, vibrierend und im Grunde ein Witz, denn Beethoven veranstaltet hier ein so unkonventionelles Finale – Theater, dass nicht nur dem Publikum, sondern auch den Spielern Hören und Sehen vergehen muss – plötzlich in fremder Tonart eine Fuge, dann eine Anspielung auf ein Menuett, die aber sofort wieder vom Tisch gewischt wird – wo sind wir eigentlich? Dass diese Musik so furios rüberkommt, liegt wahrscheinlich auch am zweiten Bratscher als Gast im Quartetto di Cremona: es ist Lawrence Dutton, Mitglied des amerikanischen Emerson-Quartettes – für mich war er lange Zeit der weltbeste Quartett-Bratscher: Fünf Streicher unter Einfluss: hier spricht Beethovens Geist persönlich durch das Quartetto di Cremona und den Bratscher Lawrence Dutton. Das war der vierte Satz aus seinem Streichquintett C-Dur op. 29, erschienen als Folge 5 der Quartetteinspielungen bei dem Label Audite.

Sendebeleg siehe PDF!
[…] Auch die nächste Aufnahme ist Teil einer Serie. Das italienische Quartetto di Cremona hat bei Audite soeben die fünfte Folge seiner

ensuite Kulturmagazin | Dezember 2016 | Francois Lilienfeld Die «Zweite» Schumann: Klaviere oder Orchester?

Bewundernswert, wie der Primgeiger Cristiano Gualco diese unglaublich schwere Aufgabe klanglich realisiert. Überhaupt, der Klang dieses Quartetts: sehr homogen und auch in den wildesten und Sforzato-reichsten Stellen nie brutal. Die Musiker spielen auf vier wunderbaren italienischen Instrumenten aus dem 17./18. Jahrhundert [...] Diese Gesamtausgabe wird wohl eine Referenzaufnahme werden.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Bewundernswert, wie der Primgeiger Cristiano Gualco diese unglaublich schwere Aufgabe klanglich realisiert. Überhaupt, der Klang dieses Quartetts: sehr homogen und auch in den wildesten und Sforzato-reichsten Stellen nie brutal. Die Musiker spielen auf vier wunderbaren italienischen Instrumenten aus dem 17./18. Jahrhundert [...] Diese Gesamtausgabe wird wohl eine Referenzaufnahme werden.

Merchant Infos

Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 6
article number: 92.685
EAN barcode: 4022143926852
price group: ACX
release date: 1. July 2016
total time: 66 min.

News

date /
Typ
title
Rating
Nov 17, 2016
Award

ICMA - Nomination 2017 - Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 6
Oct 18, 2016
Award

Klang: 5 von 5 - Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 6
Sep 21, 2016
Award

BR4 Klassik - CD-Tipp - Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 6
Sep 14, 2016
Award

Supersonic - Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 6
Feb 20, 2018
Review

deropernfreund.de
Edle kammermusikalische Kost
May 17, 2017
Review

American Record Guide
This is Volume VI of the quartets from the Cremona. I reviewed Volumes II & III...
Oct 1, 2017
Review

BBC Music Magazine
This disc came as a disappointment after my extremely positive feelings about...
Dec 12, 2016
Review

ensuite Kulturmagazin
Die «Zweite» Schumann: Klaviere oder Orchester?
Oct 18, 2016
Review

Fono Forum
Mit seinen Schnörkeln und Trillerfiguren gibt sich Beethovens frühes Quartett...
Sep 22, 2016
Review

www.myclassicalnotes.com
Late and Early Beethoven
Sep 21, 2016
Review

Bayern 4 Klassik - CD-Tipp
BROADCAST CD-Tipp
Sep 14, 2016
Review

www.pizzicato.lu
Spannend bis zum Schluss
Aug 23, 2016
Review

SWR
BROADCAST
Aug 18, 2016
Review

Sunday Times
Like other such pairings, these great, tuneful quartets, Op. 18 No. 5, and Op....
Sep 8, 2016
Review

The Herald Scotland
Quartetto di Cremona's special way with Beethoven
Sep 8, 2016
Review

The Herald Scotland
With two great performances in their established pattern of coupling one early...
Apr 8, 2016
Review

Rheinische Post
Wer soll das alles hören?
Feb 8, 2016
Review

www.europadisc.co.uk
There was a time, not so long ago, when Beethoven quartet cycles could be rather...

More from Ludwig van Beethoven

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...