Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 7

92689 - Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 7

aud 92.689
Bitte Qualität wählen

Ludwig van BeethovenComplete String Quartets - Vol. 7

The Quartetto di Cremona have completed another stage in their adventurous journey through the cosmos of Beethoven’s String Quartets, visiting the Quartet in G major from the Op. 18 set and the last of the Op. 59 Quartets. Both end with an “earworm”; one in the classical spirit and one in the form of a rapid fugue – finale furioso!more

Ludwig van Beethoven

"Recorded in a warm, open acoustic, the striking range of sonorities created by the Cremona Quartet fall easily on the ear. Technically and intonationally clean as a whistle, these performances go way beyond mastering the notes themselves as part of an insatiable quest for what lies in between and behind them." (The Strad)

Multimedia

Informationen

The Quartetto di Cremona have completed another stage in their adventurous journey through the cosmos of Beethoven's String Quartets, visiting the Quartet in G major from the Op. 18 set and the last of the Op. 59 Quartets.

The performance culture and market for the string quartet in the late eighteenth century was markedly different to that of later times: the young Beethoven wrote his Quartets Op. 18 for amateurs. The G major Quartet, the second in the collection, was one such work that could bemastered by talented aristocrats and bourgeois connoisseurs - which is not tosay that its complexities or musical challenges are in any way diminished.

With the so-called "Razumovsky" Quartets,the string quartet reached adulthood. And one only needs to compare the technical and intellectual demands of Op. 59 to contemporary works (such as the quartets of the young Franz Schubert) in order to recognise that Beethoven no longer composed for able amateurs, but for highly professional specialists.This becomes particularly obvious in the finale, an extended and extremely virtuosic fugue.

The Quartetto di Cremona have combined these two works from Beethoven's early and middle periods for the seventh volume in their Complete Beethoven String Quartets recording series. Both works end with an "earworm" - one in the classical spirit and one in the form of a rapid fugue - finale furioso!

Reviews

Crescendo
Crescendo | Sonderedition ECHO KLASSIK, 06/2017 Oktober-November 2017 | October 1, 2017 Der ganze vielfältige Beethoven
Das Quartetto di Cremona legt mit der siebten Folge aller Beethoven-Quartette das Spannungsfeld von Wiener Klassik und neuer Klangwelt frei

Cristiano Gualco und Paolo Andreoli an den Geigen versprühen ungebremste Lebendigkeit, Giovanni Scaglione am Cello sorgt für die coole, ja zuweilen eiskalte Erdung, und Simone Gramaglia an der Viola ist so etwas wie das harmonische Bindeglied. [...] Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Cristiano Gualco und Paolo Andreoli an den Geigen versprühen ungebremste Lebendigkeit, Giovanni Scaglione am Cello sorgt für die coole, ja zuweilen eiskalte Erdung, und Simone Gramaglia an der Viola ist so etwas wie das harmonische Bindeglied. [...]

hifi & records
hifi & records | 4/2017 | Uwe Steiner | October 1, 2017

Im frühen G-dur-Quartett legen die Italiener mit sorgfältiger Artikulation den ganzen sprachlichen und formalen Witz dieser mehrfach gebrochenen Komposition und mit sanglicher Phrasierung ihre ganze Musikalität frei. Bewundernswert, wie transparent sich die vier Stimmen auch im dritten der Rasumowski-Quartette verzahnen. Im extremen, aber stimmig musizierten Tempo des Fugato-Finales bleibt einem angesichts des virtuosen Wechsels zwischen Staccato- und Legato-Passagen der Mund offen. Die Tontechnik erzielt eine ideale Mischung zwischen Direkt- und Raumklang und bildet die vier Streicher in aller natürlichen Schönheit atemberaubend getreu ab. Wieder eine große Empfehlung!Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Im frühen G-dur-Quartett legen die Italiener mit sorgfältiger Artikulation den ganzen sprachlichen und formalen Witz dieser mehrfach gebrochenen Komposition und mit sanglicher Phrasierung ihre ganze Musikalität frei. Bewundernswert, wie transparent sich die vier Stimmen auch im dritten der Rasumowski-Quartette verzahnen. Im extremen, aber stimmig musizierten Tempo des Fugato-Finales bleibt einem angesichts des virtuosen Wechsels zwischen Staccato- und Legato-Passagen der Mund offen. Die Tontechnik erzielt eine ideale Mischung zwischen Direkt- und Raumklang und bildet die vier Streicher in aller natürlichen Schönheit atemberaubend getreu ab. Wieder eine große Empfehlung!

concerti - Das Konzert- und Opernmagazin
concerti - Das Konzert- und Opernmagazin | Oktober 2017 | Maximilian Theiss | October 1, 2017 Kunst der Unterhaltung
ECHO KLASSIK: Weitere Preisträger

Kammermusikeinspielung (Musik bis 19. Jh. | Streicher)<br /> Kürzlich wurde der Zyklus mit Beethovens Streichquartetten vollendet, geehrt wird nun aberMehr lesen

Kammermusikeinspielung (Musik bis 19. Jh. | Streicher)
Kürzlich wurde der Zyklus mit Beethovens Streichquartetten vollendet, geehrt wird nun aber die vorletzte Einspielung der Gesamtaufnahme.
Kammermusikeinspielung (Musik bis 19. Jh. | Streicher)
Kürzlich wurde der Zyklus mit Beethovens Streichquartetten vollendet, geehrt wird nun aber

Crescendo
Crescendo | 27.09.2017 | September 27, 2017 | source: http://www.cresc... ECHO KLASSIK 2017: Das Quartetto di Cremona
Das Quartetto die Cremona legt mit der siebten Folge aller Beethoven-Quartette das Spannungsfeld von Wiener Klassik und neuer Klangwelt frei

Vor 17 Jahren hat sich das Quartetto di Cremona gegründet, und was esMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Vor 17 Jahren hat sich das Quartetto di Cremona gegründet, und was es

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | September 2017 | Erik Levi | September 1, 2017

The Quartetto di Cremona's ongoing Beethoven cycle has particularly impressed me for its visceral excitement and pulsating energy. Technical demandsMehr lesen

The Quartetto di Cremona's ongoing Beethoven cycle has particularly impressed me for its visceral excitement and pulsating energy. Technical demands hold no terrors for this ensemble which dispatches the Fugal Finale to Op. 59 No. 3, taken here at breakneck speed, with dazzling clarity if not quite the elfin dexterity of the Takács Quartet on Decca. No less admirable is the seamless manner in which three of the instruments connect to a single line melodic sequence of semiquavers in the preceding Minuet.

Another strength is their consummate mastery of soft mysterious playing, experienced here to best advantage in the unexpectedly veiled sounds they conjure up just before the recapitulation to the first movement of Op. 18 No. 2, or in the harmonically radical slow introduction to Op. 59 No. 3, where they manage to stretch tension and uncertainty to almost breaking point before the exuberant release of an unequivocal C major tonality in the ensuing Allegro vivace.

Yet for all their undoubted qualities, these performances miss certain ingredients that are also central to Beethoven's musical make-up, in particular charm and humour. The outer movements of Op. 18 No. 2 are a good case in point. In the opening Allegro, for example, the Quartetto di Cremona convincingly projects the sudden explosive fortes, but the principal melodic lines seem somewhat devoid of grace and elegance. Likewise, for all its brilliance of execution, the performers underplay the sheer impudence with which Beethoven changes to distant keys in the skittish Finale. In general, therefore, the more expansive Op. 59 No. 3 is better suited to the Quartetto di Cremona's approach.
The Quartetto di Cremona's ongoing Beethoven cycle has particularly impressed me for its visceral excitement and pulsating energy. Technical demands

Fanfare | June 2017 | Huntley Dent | June 1, 2017 | source: http://www.fanfa...

Reviewers live with the frustration of how to convey music verbally, a frustration underscored by the Quartetto di Cremona. This is Vol. 7 of itsMehr lesen

Reviewers live with the frustration of how to convey music verbally, a frustration underscored by the Quartetto di Cremona. This is Vol. 7 of its complete Beethoven cycle, which has been greeted widely as intriguing and highly original. What sets these players apart comes down to an unusual quality: intellectuality. Every phrase in these two Beethoven quartets has been thrust under a mental microscope. Let me quote from a 2014 interview that violist Simone Gramaglia gave, where the question of vibrato comes up. The interviewer comments that in their account of the “Razumovsky” Quartet No. 2, the use of vibrato seems to be minimized.

It was far from a simple topic to Gramaglia: “[Vibrato] is a matter of the performers’ taste but also of structure….In op. 59 no. 2 there are many sections in E minor that are very dark but not as dark as, for example, in the tonality of C minor. There are many extremes of violence, and it’s very important to bring brightness into the darkness.” Brightness is interpreted as calling for no vibrato in this case. Gramaglia goes on to talk about how expressivity doesn’t necessarily mean the use of vibrato; there is a wide range of bowing techniques as well as the contract point of the bow on the string that must be considered.

The interviewer is intrigued by the PR blurb for the same recording, which says, “Beethoven’s musical language is no longer balanced and ‘well seasoned’ like that of his contemporaries but is extreme in every respect—ruthless and with feeling, dramatically operatic, and full of contrapuntal finesse.” It’s very promising that so much analytical attention is being applied to middle-period Beethoven (I’ve barely skimmed the surface of the interview), and the resulting performance on this new recording of the “Razumovsky” Quartet No. 3 is original to the point of being peculiar. As much ingenuity is applied to the details of sonority as if we were hearing one of Bartók’s later quartets. In fact, I’ve never encountered Beethoven played in such a piercing, at times existential, hollow, despairing, and alienated manner. Delivering a moment of charm is almost a betrayal of the ethos the Quartetto di Cremona wants to convey.

Typically, a group that plays the drawn-out chords of the Introduzione without vibrato would be making a period performance gesture. Here, however, the effect is stark, a slash-and-burn that is unabashed. But then what to do when the main Allegro vivace, with its boisterous major-key exuberance, contradicts the opening? The same dilemma arises in the second movement, where a certain poised lightness is implied by the marking Andante con moto quasi allegretto. The Cremona rocks back and forth with a questioning pulse that’s neurotically moody. Once again it’s very effective, but the gentle strain that comes up in the violins isn’t remotely this eerie as Beethoven scores it.

One can point to many imaginative details—they crop up in practically every measure—and after a certain point the listener must either give in or rebel. I find myself strongly on the side of giving in and appreciating with fascination how a familiar work is suddenly made to sound new. The Cremonas have made the point in print that Beethoven’s mature quartets are highly intellectual and deserve this kind of intense scrutiny. The scherzo creeps in on cat’s paws and really does remind me of the lopsided Hungarian dance rhythms of Bartók. The most divisive movement is the finale, where the marking of Allegro molto is injected here with amphetamines, turning into a manic Presto that to me sounds breathless. In all fairness, however, the 5:46 timing isn’t radically faster than the Alban Berg Quartet’s 6:01 from that ensemble’s first Beethoven cycle (EMI/Warner).

The second quartet from the op. 18 set fulfills Monty Python’s “and now for something completely different.” The Hamlet-like mood of the Cremonas’ “Razumovsky” performance is discarded in favor of comic relief. Using a bright tone made brighter without vibrato, they take the first movement and extend its Haydnesque animation into Beethoven’s unbuttoned brio. The four members of the Quartetto di Cremona—Cristiano Gualco and Paolo Andreoli, violins, Simone Gramaglia, viola, and Giovanni Scaglione, cello—are carefree and confident no matter how fast the passagework is. Every movement of their op. 18/2 wears a smile, and the performance exults in its own playfulness. The ensemble’s tone changes in weight and color quite impressively to match the moment, although the general tendency is toward a contemporary lightness and even edginess.

In all, this is a disc that makes me want to hear all of the Cremonas’ Beethoven to date. In the Fanfare Archive I found only one review so far, Jerry Dubins’s of Vol. 2 from 2014, which pairs the Second “Razumovsky” with op. 127. He seconds my opinion that this is a group to get excited about. Bright, lifelike sound from Audite adds to the immediacy of the performances.
Reviewers live with the frustration of how to convey music verbally, a frustration underscored by the Quartetto di Cremona. This is Vol. 7 of its

The Strad
The Strad | May 2017 | Julian Haylock | May 1, 2017 | source: https://www.thes... THE STRAD RECOMMENDS

Recorded in a warm, open acoustic, the striking range of sonorities createdMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Recorded in a warm, open acoustic, the striking range of sonorities created

www.pizzicato.lu | 22/04/2017 | Guy Engels | April 22, 2017 | source: https://www.pizz... Grandioses Finale in Dur

Beethoven als Lebensbegleiter scheint das Motto des ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ zu sein. Ergänzend zu den fulminanten und feurigen Aufnahmen derMehr lesen

Beethoven als Lebensbegleiter scheint das Motto des ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ zu sein. Ergänzend zu den fulminanten und feurigen Aufnahmen der Streichquartette, spielen die italienischen Musiker den gesamten Zyklus wiederholt in Konzertreihen.

Fast hat man den Eindruck, dass die Beethovenschen Quartette zu einer Art Droge geworden sind, eine Musik, die die Cremoneser nicht mehr loslässt. Gerade diesen fesselnden Zustand übertragen sie auch auf ihre Zuhörer. Man sitzt gespannt vor der Stereo-Anlage und lässt sich von jeder Note, von jeder Artikulation, von jedem Zwischenton mitreißen.

Das galt für die bisherigen sechs CDs dieser großartigen Referenz-Einspielung, das gilt auch für die neueste Produktion mit den Quartetten op. 18/2 und op. 59/3. Dass diese Gesamteinspielung Referenzcharakter haben würde, war sehr früh abzusehen.

Es zeugt von höchster Musikalität, von höchstem musikalischen Einvernehmen, wenn man als Quartett über einen derart langen Zeitraum die gleiche Spannung, die gleiche Intensität, die gleiche Frische des Musizierens aufrechterhalten kann.

Auch diesmal steht ein frühes Werk einer reiferen Komposition gegenüber. Das Quartett in G-Dur klingt frisch, wie eine leichte Brise, kraftvoll, spritzig in den schnellen Sätzen, verinnerlicht im Adagio.

Das spätere, dritte ‘Rasumowski-Quartett’ ist in seiner Anlage reifer und kühner. Einmal mehr lässt sich das ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ von dieser Kühnheit Beethovens nicht einschüchtern. Es pariert sie mit forschem Impetus, intensiver Spannung und kammermusikalischer Virtuosität, wie sie selten zu hören ist.

Excitingly intense and deeply musical performances of Beethoven’s Quartets op. 18/2 and 59/3.

Eine andere Rezension gibt es hier:
https://www.pizzicato.lu/was-fur-ein-zyklus/
Beethoven als Lebensbegleiter scheint das Motto des ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ zu sein. Ergänzend zu den fulminanten und feurigen Aufnahmen der

www.pizzicato.lu | 24/02/2017 | Uwe Krusch | February 24, 2017 | source: http://www.pizzi... Was für ein Zyklus!

Eigentlich reicht der Satz: Es geht weiter wie bisher. Die Reihe der Einspielungen der Beethoven-Quartette wird mit zwei Quartetten aus den beidenMehr lesen

Eigentlich reicht der Satz: Es geht weiter wie bisher. Die Reihe der Einspielungen der Beethoven-Quartette wird mit zwei Quartetten aus den beiden Zyklen op. 18, nämlich der Nummer 2 in G-Dur und dem dritten in C-Dur aus op. 59 durch das ‘Quartetto di Cremona’ fortgesetzt.

Wiederum wird die überwältigende Behandlung der Musik deutlich. Hier haben nicht die Quartettmusiker ihren Meister gefunden, sondern sie sind die Meister der Musik.

Ins Ohr fällt sofort der leichtere Ansatz, den man wohl mit italienischer Leichtigkeit bezeichnen könnte. Damit gelingt es den Cremonensern, den Werken eine Brillanz und Frische mitzugeben, die manch anderer Interpretation fehlt, möglicherweise, weil sich da der hinterhermarschierende Riese im Hinterkopf festgesetzt hat.

So erreichen die vier beispielsweise im Finalsatz des dritten Rasumovsky Quartetts eine schlicht umwerfende Rasanz, die aber den Eindruck spielerischer Leichtigkeit geradezu noch steigert, da das Spiel zwar umwerfend schnell klingt, gleichzeitig aber entspannt. Es bleibt der Eindruck, dass da Reserven vorhanden wären, während andere hier doch hechelnd ins Ziel kommen.

Two more of Beethoven’s string quartets provide decisive proof of Quartetto di Cremona’s overwhelming technical capacity and fantastic musicianship.
Eigentlich reicht der Satz: Es geht weiter wie bisher. Die Reihe der Einspielungen der Beethoven-Quartette wird mit zwei Quartetten aus den beiden

www.classicalcdreview.com
www.classicalcdreview.com | February 2017 | R.E.B. | February 1, 2017 | source: http://www.class...

This site has praised previous issues in the series, and those high standards continue here [...] the engineers have captured a very realistic audio picture.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
This site has praised previous issues in the series, and those high standards continue here [...] the engineers have captured a very realistic audio picture.

Merchant Infos

Ludwig van Beethoven: Complete String Quartets - Vol. 7
article number: 92.689
EAN barcode: 4022143926890
price group: ACX
release date: 3. February 2017
total time: 56 min.

More from Ludwig van Beethoven

More from these Artists

More from this Genre

...