Wichtiger Hinweis

Add download to your cart

Mahler cycle with Rafael Kubelik in live recordings

S-1
please choose the quality
Series

Mahler cycle with Rafael Kubelik in live recordings

The audite Mahler cycle with Rafael Kubelik and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra contains live recordings of Gustav Mahler's Symphonies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 as well as The Song of the Earth (with Janet Baker and Waldemar Kmentt).more

"...you won't find readings of greater warmth, humanity and patient sensitivity. That the pulse has slowed just a little is all to the good, and the more spacious sonic stage preserved by Bavarian Radio bathes the music-making in an appealing glow without serious loss of details." (Gramophone)

Track List

Informationen

The audite Mahler cycle with Rafael Kubelik and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra contains live recordings of Gustav Mahler's Symphonies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 as well as The Song of the Earth (with Janet Baker and Waldemar Kmentt).

Reviews

ClicMag
ClicMag | N° 10s Novembre 2013 | Jérôme Angouillant | November 1, 2013

Deux figures légendaires de l'interprétation mahlérienne réunies à l'occasion d'un concert à Munich pour l'oeuvre peut-être la plus intime et douloureuse de Mahler: « Le chant de la terre ».Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Deux figures légendaires de l'interprétation mahlérienne réunies à l'occasion d'un concert à Munich pour l'oeuvre peut-être la plus intime et douloureuse de Mahler: « Le chant de la terre ».

Classic Collection | WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2010 | Victor Carr Jr | December 29, 2010

This Kubelik Mahler Two is the latest in Audite's series of live BavarianMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
This Kubelik Mahler Two is the latest in Audite's series of live Bavarian

Sunday Times
Sunday Times | 5 December 2010 | David Cairns | December 5, 2010

Sunday Times classical records of the year<br /> <br /> Kubelik inspires his BavarianMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Sunday Times classical records of the year

Kubelik inspires his Bavarian

Fanfare | Issue 34:2 (Nov/Dec 2010) | Lynn René Bayley | November 1, 2010

It’s really a pity that this disc is just a reissue of a performance previously available in DGG’s set of complete Mahler symphonies conducted byMehr lesen

It’s really a pity that this disc is just a reissue of a performance previously available in DGG’s set of complete Mahler symphonies conducted by Kubelík, as there’s so much I’d like to say about it that’s probably already been said, so I shall reduce my comments to the minimum.

Being personally very fussy in regard to symphonies including singers, I’ll automatically reject performances with defective voices even if the conducting is considered to be the best ever. For this reason, I don’t own the otherwise fantastic performances by Jascha Horenstein and Klaus Tennstedt, and never will, just as I don’t own or even listen to most recordings of the Beethoven Ninth made after, say, 1980. Solti’s famous studio recording of this Mahler symphony had, perhaps, the best eight singers amassed in one place, but they were recorded separately from the orchestra, which created a flat, two-dimensional sound I find offensive. That being said, I am partial to the recordings by Leopold Stokowski (1950), Bernard Haitink (the earlier recording with Cotrubas, Harper, and Prey), and Antoni Wit, in which the defective voices are, to my ears, less annoying than in the others, and generally just one bad voice per ensemble.

The fact that Kubelík, who never pushed his name or fame and in fact retreated from a publicity machine, was able to entice these eight outstanding singers to Munich for this performance says a lot for how much he was respected as a musician. The one name not universally feted at the time was tenor Donald Grobe, and ironically he produces the finest singing of this very difficult music I’ve ever heard (James King with Solti notwithstanding). Kubelík also managed to get truly involved and exciting singing out of Martina Arroyo, and that in itself is a miracle. (He did the same with Gundula Janowitz in his studio recording of Die Meistersinger, though overall his conducting on that set, like most of his conducting in a studio environment, lacks the full power and emotional commitment of his live work). Sometimes the singers are a little off-mike, coming only out of the left or right speakers, but that’s a condition of the original microphone setup and can’t be changed.

Undoubtedly the most controversial aspect of this performance is its full-speed-ahead tempos, particularly in “Veni, Creator Spiritus,” which Kubelík dispatches in a mere 21 minutes. (Don’t believe the designation of 21:30 on the CD box; 25 seconds of that is silence with audience coughing before part II.) But, shockingly, it doesn’t sound terribly rushed most of the time, there are few dropped notes, and the whole thing has the ecstatic quality of a satori. If you happen to be allergic to fast tempos in Mahler, then, this recording is not for you, but if that’s not a problem you’ll find this the greatest Mahler Eighth ever issued. I’ve hereby retired the Haitink recording from my collection; good as it is, it doesn’t have Kubelík’s overwhelming emotional impact. Since not every performance in the Kubelík set is of equal quality (no conductor’s integral set is consistently great), I encourage you to add this disc to your collection. Audite’s 24-bit remastering brings out every detail of this performance with stunning warmth and clarity. I’d compare the sound favorably to any all-digital Eighth on the market.
It’s really a pity that this disc is just a reissue of a performance previously available in DGG’s set of complete Mahler symphonies conducted by

The Jewish Daily Forward | July 28, 2010 | Benjamin Ivry | July 28, 2010 A Lively Musical Corpus
Gustav Mahler, Almost a Century Dead and Still Kicking

Although other composers are most suitably celebrated on the anniversariesMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Although other composers are most suitably celebrated on the anniversaries

Audiophile Audition
Audiophile Audition | July 2, 2010 | Patrick P.L. Lam | July 2, 2010 Rafael Kubelik and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra attest to this Mahlerian vision through a combination of technical command and musical coherency.

“I have just completed my 8th – it is the greatest I’ve ever done.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
“I have just completed my 8th – it is the greatest I’ve ever done.

Infodad.com | June 24, 2010 | June 24, 2010

With Mahler’s music now so popular – with a veritable flood ofMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
With Mahler’s music now so popular – with a veritable flood of

Infodad.com | 01.06.2010 | June 1, 2010

With Mahler’s music now so popular – with a veritable flood ofMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
With Mahler’s music now so popular – with a veritable flood of

Sunday Times
Sunday Times | May 30, 2010 | Dan Cairns | May 30, 2010

The Czech conductor Rafael Kubelik’s years as director of the BavarianMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
The Czech conductor Rafael Kubelik’s years as director of the Bavarian

WETA fm
WETA fm | Saturday, 11.28.09, 10:00 am | Jens F. Laurson | November 28, 2009

Mahler’s Seventh Symphony is a forbidding work that can baffle theMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mahler’s Seventh Symphony is a forbidding work that can baffle the

WETA fm
WETA fm | Saturday, 11.21.09, 4:00 am | Jens F. Laurson | November 21, 2009

WETA will have finished playing through the three complete Mahler cyclesMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
WETA will have finished playing through the three complete Mahler cycles

The New York Sun
The New York Sun | April 16, 2008 | Benjamin Ivry | April 16, 2008

In Stephen Sondheim's 1970 musical "Company," Elaine Stritch raspily sang aMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
In Stephen Sondheim's 1970 musical "Company," Elaine Stritch raspily sang a

Diapason
Diapason | Avril 2007 | Christian Merlin | April 1, 2007 Gustav Mahler : La symphonie n° 3

Mois après mois, toutes les clés pour comprendre les chefs-d'oeuvre du répertoire : histoire, enjeux, guide d'écoute et repèresMehr lesen

Mois après mois, toutes les clés pour comprendre les chefs-d'oeuvre du répertoire : histoire, enjeux, guide d'écoute et repères discographiques.

[...]

Plus que de simples outsiders, deux Tchèques ont su retrouver les racines bohémiennes de Mahler : Kubelik, dont le live lyrique et véhément (Audite) est bien préférable à la version de studio, exactement contemporaine (DG), et le trop oublie Vaclav Neumann [...].
Mois après mois, toutes les clés pour comprendre les chefs-d'oeuvre du répertoire : histoire, enjeux, guide d'écoute et repères

Classica-Répertoire
Classica-Répertoire | novembre 2006 | Stéphane Friédérich | November 1, 2006 ecoute comparée – La Symphonie n°1 «Titan» de Gustav Mahler
Audition en aveugle

Rafael Kubelik et l'Orchestre symphonique de la Radio de Bavière (DG,Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik et l'Orchestre symphonique de la Radio de Bavière (DG,

www.allmusic.com | 01.12.2005 | Blair Sanderson | December 1, 2005

Rafael Kubelik made this live recording of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 8Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik made this live recording of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 8

Classica-Répertoire
Classica-Répertoire | septembre 2005 | Stéphane Friédérich | September 1, 2005 La Sixième Symphonie de Gustav Mahler

Une soixante d’interprétations étaient en compétition pour cetteMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Une soixante d’interprétations étaient en compétition pour cette

www.SA-CD.net
www.SA-CD.net | August 26, 2005 | Mark Wagner | August 6, 2005

Hmmmmm.....<br /> <br /> First, I will say that I have never heard a recording orMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Hmmmmm.....

First, I will say that I have never heard a recording or

www.ionarts.org | Friday, July 08, 2005 | July 8, 2005 Live Recordings of Mahler's Eighth

Speaking of such a performance, Rafael Kubelik's 8th on Audite was alsoMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Speaking of such a performance, Rafael Kubelik's 8th on Audite was also

www.SA-CD.net
www.SA-CD.net | June 9, 2005 | Oscar Gil | June 9, 2005

Kubelik is one of the truly great Mahler conductors. He focuses on the moreMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Kubelik is one of the truly great Mahler conductors. He focuses on the more

Le Monde de la Musique
Le Monde de la Musique | Juin 2005 | Patrick Szersnovicz | June 1, 2005

Œuvre « officielle » chantant la joie de créer, vocale d'un bout à l'autre, la Huitième Symphonie « des Mille » (1906) est gagnée parMehr lesen

Œuvre « officielle » chantant la joie de créer, vocale d'un bout à l'autre, la Huitième Symphonie « des Mille » (1906) est gagnée par l'illusion que des sujets sublimes – l'hymne Veni Creator, la scène finale du Second Faust de Goethe – garantiront la sublimité du contenu. Mais la structure fermée de son premier mouvement – une stricte forme sonate – et sa polyphonie serrée sauvent l'hymne de son caractère platement édifiant.

Si toute interprétation doit venir en aide à l'insuffisance des œuvres, la Huitième Symphonie requiert une interprétation parfaite. Enregistré « live » le 24 juin 1970 à Munich, à la tête d'un orchestre et de chanteurs exemplaires, Rafael Kubelik offre une vision puissante, « moderniste » et très proche de sa – magnifique – version officielle réalisée pour DG à la même époque. Si l'on demeure assez loin de l'exaltation d'un Bernstein ou de l'enthousiasme d'un Ozawa, l'équilibre et la rapidité des tempos, l'absence de pathos donnent la priorité au tissu musical. Le chef souligne dans le « Veni Creator » tout l'acquis des symphonies instrumentales précédentes et évite, dans la « Scène de Faust », l'écueil d'une simple succession d'airs et de chœurs. La prise de son, malgré l'excellence du report, n'est pas parfaite, mais la qualité des solistes vocaux est unique dans la discographie.
Œuvre « officielle » chantant la joie de créer, vocale d'un bout à l'autre, la Huitième Symphonie « des Mille » (1906) est gagnée par

Classica-Répertoire
Classica-Répertoire | Juin 2005 | Stéphane Friédérich | June 1, 2005

Audite poursuit son intégrale live des symphonies de Mahler en nousMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Audite poursuit son intégrale live des symphonies de Mahler en nous

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | May 2005 | David Hurwitz | May 1, 2005

This live Mahler Symphony No. 8, made the same month as Rafael Kubelik'sMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
This live Mahler Symphony No. 8, made the same month as Rafael Kubelik's

www.classicstodayfrance.com
www.classicstodayfrance.com | Mai 2005 | Christophe Huss | May 1, 2005

Quel incroyable contraste avec la version Nagano qui paraît en mêmeMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Quel incroyable contraste avec la version Nagano qui paraît en même

Diapason
Diapason | Mai 2005 | Jean-Charles Hoffele | May 1, 2005

Ce n'est pas la relative méforme de Norma Procter qui fragilisera le geste épique de Kubelik dans ce concert inédit, enregistré en même temps queMehr lesen

Ce n'est pas la relative méforme de Norma Procter qui fragilisera le geste épique de Kubelik dans ce concert inédit, enregistré en même temps que la fameuse gravure de studio pour DG (et avec exactement la même équipe). Les ingénieurs de la Radio bavaroise ont réalisé une prise de son exemplaire de réalisme, supérieure à celle, plus sèche, du disque DG, saisissante dès les premiers accords du Veni creator, emporté d'un seul souffle (vingt et une minutes !). Cette exaltation, seul Bernstein l'a fait entendre. Mais là où il marque les épisodes, Kubelik tient le tempo : l'avancée, inexorable, vers la jubilation de la coda gagne en puissance mesure après mesure, laissant éclater les polyphonies circulaires du chœur – la fameuse rotation des astres que Mahler voulait illustrer.

La Seconde scène de Faust est ici un opéra : les chanteurs incarnent les personnages idéaux voulus par Goethe avec un sens dramatique que certains trouveront trop prononcé. Lorsqu'on entend la coda soulevée par Kubelik, galvanisée, on comprend que la 8e est une symphonie sans ombre, un chant du cosmos radieux avec l'être humain en son centre. Elle célèbre les noces de la vie et de l'univers avant que ne revienne le peuple de fantômes qui n'a presque jamais quitté le compositeur.
Ce n'est pas la relative méforme de Norma Procter qui fragilisera le geste épique de Kubelik dans ce concert inédit, enregistré en même temps que

Muzyka21
Muzyka21 | maj 2005 | Michał Szulakowski | May 1, 2005

„Wszystkie moje wcześniejsze symfonie były tylko preludium do tejMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
„Wszystkie moje wcześniejsze symfonie były tylko preludium do tej

klassik.com | April 2005 | Miquel Cabruja | April 18, 2005 Mehrkanaligkeit

In immer kürzeren Abständen wirft die Musikindustrie neue Formate auf denMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
In immer kürzeren Abständen wirft die Musikindustrie neue Formate auf den

CD Compact
CD Compact | Abril 2005 | Benjamín Fontvella | April 1, 2005

No es fácil saber si ésta es una edición del año 2005 o unaMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
No es fácil saber si ésta es una edición del año 2005 o una

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | 3/2005 | Rémy Franck | March 1, 2005

Am 25. & 26. Juni 1970 nahm Rafael Kubelik die Achte Mahler im Studio für die Deutsche Grammophon auf. Am 24 Juni entstand mit demselbenMehr lesen

Am 25. & 26. Juni 1970 nahm Rafael Kubelik die Achte Mahler im Studio für die Deutsche Grammophon auf. Am 24 Juni entstand mit demselben hochkarätigen Solistenensemble diese Live-Aufnahme: was an Perfektion fehlt, wird, wie immer bei Kubelik, durch die Spontaneität des Dirigierens mehr als nur wettgemacht. Und so hört man auf dieser Platte eine der zügigsten, lebendigsten pulsierendsten und kontrastreichsten Interpretationen dieser Symphonie, die ich kenne.
Am 25. & 26. Juni 1970 nahm Rafael Kubelik die Achte Mahler im Studio für die Deutsche Grammophon auf. Am 24 Juni entstand mit demselben

klassik-heute.com
klassik-heute.com | Februar 2005 | Sixtus König | February 8, 2005

Die Aufführung von Gustav Mahlers achter Sinfonie im Juni 1970 bildeteMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Aufführung von Gustav Mahlers achter Sinfonie im Juni 1970 bildete

Wiener Zeitung
Wiener Zeitung | Samstag, 05. Februar 2005 | Edwin Baumgartner | February 5, 2005 Kubelik: Mahler-Symphonien 6, 7 und 8

Rafael Kubelik war der Prototyp des hochintelligenten und dabeiMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik war der Prototyp des hochintelligenten und dabei

Wiener Zeitung
Wiener Zeitung | Samstag, 05. Februar 2005 | Edwin Baumgartner | February 5, 2005 Kubelik: Mahler-Symphonien 6, 7 und 8

Rafael Kubelik war der Prototyp des hochintelligenten und dabeiMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik war der Prototyp des hochintelligenten und dabei

Wiener Zeitung
Wiener Zeitung | Samstag, 05. Februar 2005 | Edwin Baumgartner | February 5, 2005 Kubelik: Mahler-Symphonien 6, 7 und 8

Rafael Kubelik war der Prototyp des hochintelligenten und dabeiMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik war der Prototyp des hochintelligenten und dabei

www.new-classics.co.uk
www.new-classics.co.uk | January 2005 | January 1, 2005

In this outstanding live recording dating from 1970, Rafael Kubelik conducts the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra in Mahler’s Das Lied von der ErdeMehr lesen

In this outstanding live recording dating from 1970, Rafael Kubelik conducts the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra in Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde (‘The Song of the Earth’). In this exciting performance of the symphony for tenor and alto voices, the soloists are the superb Janet Baker and Waldemar Kmentt. A full English text is included with the CD. ‘The polyphony of timbres at the work’s conclusion will be remembered as one of the greatest and most moving achievements of Rafael Kubelik and his orchestra’ - Suddeutsche Zeitung.
In this outstanding live recording dating from 1970, Rafael Kubelik conducts the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra in Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde

www.new-classics.co.uk
www.new-classics.co.uk | January 2005 | January 1, 2005

The renowned Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Women’s Chorus, conducted by the great Rafael Kubelik, perform one of Gustav Mahler’sMehr lesen

The renowned Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Women’s Chorus, conducted by the great Rafael Kubelik, perform one of Gustav Mahler’s masterpieces, his Symphony No. 3. The Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, under Kubelik’s direction, gives a suitably forceful performance and the choir’s singing is exceptional. A full English text is included with the sleeve notes.
The renowned Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Women’s Chorus, conducted by the great Rafael Kubelik, perform one of Gustav Mahler’s

CD Compact
CD Compact | n°174 (marzo 2004) | Francisco Javier Aguirre | March 1, 2004 Audite/Rafael Kubelik

El intenso patriota que fue este director checo, celebró el regreso a suMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
El intenso patriota que fue este director checo, celebró el regreso a su

CD Compact
CD Compact | n°174 (marzo 2004) | Francisco Javier Aguirre | March 1, 2004 Audite/Rafael Kubelik

El intenso patriota que fue este director checo, celebró el regreso a suMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
El intenso patriota que fue este director checo, celebró el regreso a su

www.musicweb-international.com
www.musicweb-international.com | February 2004 | Tony Duggan | February 1, 2004

Unlike the Audite release of Rafael Kubelik conducting Mahler’s First Symphony in 1971 already reviewed, this "live" recording of the Sixth datesMehr lesen

Unlike the Audite release of Rafael Kubelik conducting Mahler’s First Symphony in 1971 already reviewed, this "live" recording of the Sixth dates from the same week as his studio recording for DG. In fact I think we can say that this would have been the concert performance mounted to give the orchestra a chance to rehearse and perform the work prior to recording it in the very same hall. Consequently there is really no difference between this and the DG version and if you already have the latter there is no need for you to duplicate it. Unlike the 1971 recording of the First Symphony the Bavarian Radio engineers have given the orchestra pretty much the same kind of sound balance as those of their DG colleagues. Everything is close up with little air around the instruments, the winds especially, and a rather light bass end too. Of course, if you don’t own the DG version and are interested in collecting this Audite cycle then you will still need to know about Kubelik in this work.


As I wrote when reviewing the Audite release of the First Symphony, Kubelik’s reputation in Mahler is often misleading. You often see expressions like "understated", "lightweight" and "lyrical" ascribed to it. It’s all relative, of course. True, Kubelik is certainly especially effective when Mahler goes outdoors, back to nature and the "Wunderhorn" moods. But he can also surprise us in those later works where a more astringent, Modernist, fractured approach is called for. This is especially the case if you are prepared to see those crucial aspects through the tinted glass of nature awareness and in context with how he sees the works that go before and after them. No better illustration of his ability to take in the advanced, forward-looking aspect of Mahler's work is provided by his approach to this most Modernist of Mahler’s symphonies.


Kubelik’s performance of the Sixth is astringent and very pro-active. This is the music of a man of action and vigour which, when Mahler wrote it, he certainly was. The first movement is very fast and this certainly stresses the classical basis of this most classically structured movement and therefore, I believe, the nature of the Tragedy embodied. It makes us see Mahler’s "hero" prior to the tragedy that overwhelms him in the last movement in that the pressing forward stresses optimism, a head held high, a corrective to those accounts that seem to want to condemn Mahler’s hero to his doom from the word go, like Barbirolli, for example. It also has the effect of making the music jagged and nervy in the way the episodes tumble past kaleidoscopically. I must praise the Bavarian Radio Orchestra here for managing to hang on so unerringly to the notes most of the time. Of course the DG studio version means that there are no errors of playing but you could argue that if you are going to hear a one-off "live" performance a few mistakes only add to the tension. Remember, however, that Kubelik’s tempi in Mahler are always on average faster than his colleagues and that ought to mitigate a little the speeds encountered here.


The Scherzo is placed second and reinforces the energy, rigour and astringency I remarked on in the first movement. As usual Kubelik is consistent and uncompromising to his vision. Perhaps the speed adopted here does fail to convey the peculiar "gait" of the music and that must be a minus. After this the third movement is beautifully free-flowing and unselfconscious. In fact it is hard to imagine a performance of this movement that could be much better in the way it seems to unfold unassisted, moving in one great breath to a glorious climax that is more effective for being neither under nor over -stated. Notice particularly the nostalgic solo trumpet that is as true a Mahlerian sound as you could wish for. The close-in recording also allows many details to emerge that you may not have hitherto heard so well.


The opening of the last movement is superbly done with trenchancy and harsh detail unflinchingly presented. The main allegro passages emit the same white-hot intensity of the first two movements and yet there remains a controlling mind behind it to guard against the intensity turning into abandonment and so the tension is ratcheted up. There are, as ever, no histrionics from Kubelik. Indeed there is from him just a tunnel-visioned concentration. However, I did begin to feel, particularly after the first hammer blow, that all of this high intensity actually threatens to overwhelm the music’s innate poetry where there needs to be a degree more flexibility, a degree more humanity. That this impression crucially impedes the listener’s ability to notice contrasting passages where you could reflect on what has gone and what might be to come. I suppose you could say that Kubelik allows no time to catch the breath and I really think there should be some. In fact I think much the same can be said about the first two movements under Kubelik but that it takes the experience of the fourth movement pitched at this pace to really bring this home. The Coda, where the trombone section intones a funeral oration over the remains of the fallen hero is, however, under Kubelik an extraordinary sound with a degree of vibrato allowed to the players that chills to the marrow. That, at least, is deeply moving and well worth waiting for even if my overall verdict on Kubelik in this whole symphony is that it falls short of the greatest.


In the end I am left with the feeling that this is a partial picture of the Sixth, albeit an impressive one, but still a partial one which leaves us unsatisfied. I would advise you to turn to Thomas Sanderling on RS which I deal with in my Mahler recordings survey or Gunther Herbig whose recording on Berlin Classics I nominated a Record of the Month, there is also Mariss Jansons on LSO Live whose recent recording impressed me greatly and Michael Gielen on Hänssler. Look to all of those those first.


Rafael Kubelik views the Sixth as high intensity drama right the way through. A perfectly valid view and thrillingly delivered. But this protean work succeeds when its protean nature is laid out before us and Kubelik, eyes wide open, does not really do that. More space, more weight, more room is needed throughout and at particularly crucial nodal points (the two hammer-blows are too lightweight in preparation and delivery, for example) to really move and impress as this symphony can under those mentioned above.


Kubelik’s Mahler Sixth is a very vivid, though very partial, view of the work.
Unlike the Audite release of Rafael Kubelik conducting Mahler’s First Symphony in 1971 already reviewed, this "live" recording of the Sixth dates

www.musicweb-international.com
www.musicweb-international.com | February 2004 | Tony Duggan | February 1, 2004

The last time I reviewed a recording of Mahler’s Third Symphony I stated again my belief that in this work above all of Mahler’s we must look to aMehr lesen

The last time I reviewed a recording of Mahler’s Third Symphony I stated again my belief that in this work above all of Mahler’s we must look to a group of recordings made over thirty years ago. Only there can we reach into what I believe to be the real soul of this amazing piece. It is surprising that two of those recordings I consider indispensable were not even made for commercial release but for radio broadcasting. Sir John Barbirolli’s recording on BBC Legends (BBCL 4004-7), the recording I find I return to most often, was made for broadcast albeit under studio conditions; likewise a superb concert recording by Jean Martinon and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra from 1967, only available in a commemorative box and crying out for single release. Among the commercial studio recordings from that time Jascha Horenstein (Unicorn UKCD20067) still shines out with Rafael Kubelik’s (only available now as part of a complete cycle from DG) running it very close. If you add Leonard Bernstein’s first version from the same era (Sony SM2K61831) you have a profile of recordings that musically will last you for a lifetime and which, for me, have yet to be equalled in true understanding of what makes this crazy work tick. The dedicated audiophile will, of course, need to purchase more up to date recordings but music making surely comes first.

It takes a particular kind of conductor to turn in a great Mahler Third. No place for the tentative, or the sophisticated, particularly in the first movement which will dominate how the rest of the symphony comes to sound no matter how good the rest is. No place for apologies in that first movement especially. No conductor should underplay the full implications of this music’s ugliness for fear of offending sensibilities. The lighter and lyrical passages will largely take care of themselves. It’s the "dirty end" of the music - low brass and percussion, shrieking woodwinds, growling basses, flatulent trombone solos - that the conductor must really immerse himself in. A regrettable trait of musical "political correctness" seems to have crept into more recent performances and recordings and that is to be deplored. If you want an example of this listen to Andrew Litton’s ever-so-polite Dallas recording. There is much to admire in some recent recordings by Tilson Thomas, Abbado and Rattle to name just three from recent digital years. However they don’t approach their older colleagues in laying bare the full implications of the unique sound-world Mahler created in the way that I think it should be heard. The edges need to be sharp, the drama challenging, Mahler’s gestalt shrieking, marching, surging, seething and, at key moments, hitting the proverbial fan.

Rafael Kubelik’s superb DG recording had one drawback in that the recorded balance was, like the rest of his Munich studio cycle, rather close-miked and somewhat lacking in atmosphere. It never bothered me that much, as you can probably imagine, but just occasionally I felt the need for a little more space. As luck would have it, this Audite release in the series of "live" Mahler performances from Kubelik’s Munich years comes from the same week as that DG studio version and must have been the concert performance mounted to give the players the chance to perform the work prior to recording in the empty hall. It goes some way to addressing the problem of recorded balance in that there is a degree more space and atmosphere, more separation across the stereo arc especially. It thus offers an even more satisfying experience whilst still delivering Kubelik’s gripping and involving interpretation with the added tensions of "live" performance. There is a little background tape hiss but nothing that the true music lover need fear. So here is another "not originally for release" broadcast recording of Mahler’s Third for the list of top recommendations.

Like all great Mahler Thirds this reading has a fierce unity and a striking sense of purpose across the whole six movements, lifting it above so many versions that miss this crucial aspect among so many others. Tempi are faster than you may be used to. It also pays as much attention to the inner movements as it does the outer with playing of poetry, charm and that hard-to-pin-down aspect, wonderment. In the first movement Kubelik echoes Schoenberg’s belief that this is a struggle between good and evil, generating the real tension needed to mark this. Listen to the gathering together of all the threads for the central storms section, for example. Kubelik also comes close to Barbirolli’s raucous, unforgettable "grand day out up North" march spectacle and shares his British colleague’s (and Leonard Bernstein’s) sense of the sheer wackiness of it all. Listen to the wonderful Bavarian basses and cellos rocking the world with their uprushes and those raw, rude trombone solos, as black as an undertaker’s hat and about as delicate as a Bronx cheer or an East End Raspberry. Kubelik also manages to give the impression of the movement as a living organism, growling and purring in passages of repose particularly, fur bristling like a cat in a thunderstorm. Too often you have the feeling in this movement that conductors cannot get over how long it is and so they want to make it sound big by making it last for ever. In fact it is a superbly organised piece that benefits from the firm hand of a conductor prepared to "put a bit of stick about" and hurry it along like Kubelik.

In the second movement there is a superb mixture of nostalgia and repose with the spiky, tart aspects of nature juxtaposing the scents and the pastels. Only Horenstein surpasses in the rhythmic pointing of the following Scherzo but Kubelik comes close as his sense of purpose seems to extend the chain of events that was begun at the very start, still pulling us on in one great procession. The pressing tempi help in this but above all there is the innate feel for the whole picture that only a master Mahlerian can pull off and frequently only in "live" performance. Marjorie Thomas is an excellent soloist and the two choirs are everything you would wish for, though Barbirolli’s Manchester boys - all urban cheekiness straight off the terraces at Old Trafford or Main Road - are just wonderful. In the last movement no one offers a more convincing tempo than Kubelik, flowing and involving, never dragging or over-sentimentalised. Like Barbirolli, though warm of heart, he refuses to indulge the music and the movement wins out as the crowning climax is as satisfying as could be wished.

This is a firm recommendation for Mahler’s Third and another gem in Audite’s Kubelik releases.
The last time I reviewed a recording of Mahler’s Third Symphony I stated again my belief that in this work above all of Mahler’s we must look to a

www.musicweb-international.com
www.musicweb-international.com | January 2004 | John Quinn | January 1, 2004

Rafael Kubelik was one of the first conductors to record a cycle of Mahler’s nine completed symphonies. Those recordings, all made with the BavarianMehr lesen

Rafael Kubelik was one of the first conductors to record a cycle of Mahler’s nine completed symphonies. Those recordings, all made with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, were set down for DG between about 1967 and 1970. Though highly esteemed by many, Kubelik’s Mahler has been judged by others to lack the expansiveness and sheer emotional weight that certain other conductors, such as Bernstein, Solti and Tennstedt offer. In recent years the Audite label has issued live performances by Kubelik of several Mahler symphonies (numbers 1, 3 and 5 have appeared to date). Last year they also put us greatly in their debt by issuing a superb live account of Das Lied von der Erde, a work that he never recorded commercially. Now along comes a concert performance of the Ninth recorded some eight years after his studio recording.


In an excellent essay on the Ninth the American writer Michael Steinberg points out the parallel drawn by Deryck Cooke between this Mahler symphony and Tchaikovsky’s Sixth. In brief, Cooke suggested that in composing his Ninth Mahler had in mind the formal model of the Pathétique, noting that both symphonies begin and end with a long movement, and that in each case the finale is an extended adagio. Both composers place shorter movements in quicker tempi between these two outer musical pillars. Steinberg adds that Mahler conducted a series of performances of the Tchaikovsky symphony in early 1910, after he had completed the full draft of his Ninth. He also reminds us that, though posterity has, perhaps inevitably, imparted a valedictory quality to both works, neither composer intended these respective symphonies to be their last compositions.


This last point seems to me to be of fundamental importance in approaching Mahler’s Ninth. Yes, it is the last work that he completed fully and he was deeply superstitious about the composition of a ninth symphony. However, he had no sooner completed the Ninth than he began frantic work on a tenth symphony, which he left fully sketched out at his death. The manuscript score of the Ninth includes a number of expressions of farewell in Mahler’s hand but there are even more of these scrawled in the manuscript of the Tenth. So, while there is a strong valedictory flavour to this symphony, most especially in the last movement, I think it’s a mistake to play it as if it were an anguished farewell to music.


I say this because Kubelik’s performance may be thought by some to be lightweight because it is comparatively swift and because long passages in the last movement in particular are more flowing than we commonly hear them. However, Kubelik’s performance is by no means the swiftest on disc. Bruno Walter’s celebrated 1938 live account with the Vienna Philharmonic lasted a "mere" 70’13" but broader conceptions seem to have become more the accepted norm as the years have passed.


The first movement of this symphony is a turbulent, seething invention. Indeed, I wonder if it may be Mahler’s single greatest achievement? Kubelik exposes the music objectively and without fuss. There’s a complete absence of excessive histrionics but the music still speaks to us powerfully. This is an interpretation of integrity – in fact, that description could well suffice for the reading of the whole symphony. Kubelik has a fine ear for texture and balance, as is evidenced, for example, in the chamber-like sonorities in the passage from 6’27" to 8’40". In these pages all the orchestral detail is picked out, but in a wholly natural way. Although there are one or two overblown notes from the brass (not a trait that is evident in the other three movements) the playing is very fine and committed. There is one unfortunate flaw, however: the timpani are ill tuned at two critical points (at 6’27" and 18’00").


The second movement is an earthy ländler and Kubelik and his players convey Mahler’s trenchant irony very well. There are innumerable shifts in the character of the music and Kubelik responds to each with acuity. I would describe his work here as understanding and idiomatic.


The turbulent, grotesque Rondo – Burleske that follows is also splendidly characterised. The contrapuntal pyrotechnics of Mahler’s score come across extremely well. The pungent fast music is interrupted (at 6’25" here) by a much warmer episode in which a shining trumpet line is particularly to the fore. This episode is beautifully judged by Kubelik. The brazen coda is well handled though I must admit that I’ve heard it done with greater panache in some other performances.


A few years ago I attended a performance of this symphony in Birmingham conducted by Simon Rattle. On that occasion he launched straight into the last movement with only an imperceptible break after the Rondo. The effect was tremendous and of a piece with his searing conception of the music on that evening. I suspect that Kubelik would never have made such a gesture for his way with the finale is less overt, less subjective. In fact the start of this movement is nothing if not dignified here. As the massed strings begin their hymn-like melody, singing their hearts out for Kubelik, we are back in the sound world of the finale to the Third symphony. There’s ample weight and gravitas from the strings in these pages. The subsequent ghostly passage that commences with the wraith-like contrabassoon solo is well controlled too.


At the heart of the movement is a long threnody, carried mainly by the strings (from 6’11"). Kubelik’s tempo is quite flowing here and it’s his treatment of this episode in particular that accounts for the relative swiftness of the movement overall. Prospective listeners may want to know that he takes 22’23" for the finale. By contrast Herbert Von Karajan (his 1982 live reading on DG) takes 26’49", Leonard Bernstein, also live on DG (his 1979 concert with the Berlin Philharmonic, his only appearance with that orchestra) takes 26’12". Jascha Horenstein on BBC Legends (a 1966 concert performance) takes 26’50". Somewhat quicker overall is Rattle in his VPO recording for EMI at 24’43". It will be noted that like Kubelik’s all these performances are live ones. However, there is one important precedent for Kubelik’s relative swiftness. Bruno Walter, the man who gave the first performance of the Ninth, dispatched the finale in an amazing 18’20" in his 1938 live VPO traversal. These comparative timings are of interest. However, I must stress that though Kubelik doesn’t hang about the music never sounds rushed. The phrases all have time to breathe and there’s no suspicion that the performance is overwrought. I found it convincing. The extended climax (from 12’56") is powerfully projected. The final pages (from 17’28") are not lacking in poignancy and as the very end approaches (from 19’08") there’s a proper feeling of hushed innigkeit and tender leave-taking. Happily, there’s no applause at the end to break the spell (indeed, there’s no distracting audience noise at all that I could discern).


The recorded sound is perfectly acceptable. The acoustic of this Tokyo hall is a little on the dry side and there isn’t quite the space and bloom round the sound not the front-to-back depth that might have been achieved in the orchestra’s regular venue, the Herkulessaal in Munich. However, the slight closeness of the recording means that lots of inner detail emerges.


There’s a good deal to admire in this recording and there’s certainly an atmosphere of live music making. Above all, this release gives us another opportunity to hear a dedicated, wide and committed Mahler conductor performing a great masterpiece of the symphonic literature with authority. This is a fine version that admirers of this conductor and devotees of Mahler should seek out and hear. I hope Audite will be able to source and release more such concert performances and, who knows, perhaps build up a complete live Kubelik Mahler cycle in due course.
Rafael Kubelik was one of the first conductors to record a cycle of Mahler’s nine completed symphonies. Those recordings, all made with the Bavarian

www.musicweb-international.com
www.musicweb-international.com | 1/2004 | Tony Duggan | January 1, 2004

For many Mahlerites over a certain age Rafael Kubelik has always been there, like a dependable uncle, part of the Mahler family landscape for as longMehr lesen

For many Mahlerites over a certain age Rafael Kubelik has always been there, like a dependable uncle, part of the Mahler family landscape for as long as we can all remember. He was one of the first to record a complete symphony cycle after many years of performing the music in the concert hall, and that DG cycle has hardly been out of the catalogue since the 1970s. Marc Bridle and I reviewed it in December 2000.

Yet it has never quite made the "splash" those by some of his colleagues have done. Kubelik’s view of Mahler is not one that attaches itself to the mind at a first, or even a second, listening. Kubelik was never the man for quick fixes or cheap thrills in any music he conducted. So in Mahler not for him the heart-on-sleeve of a Bernstein, the machine-like precision of a Solti, or the dark 19th century psychology of a Tennstedt. Kubelik’s Mahler goes back to folk roots, pursues more refined textures, accentuates song, winkles out a lyrical aspect and so has the reputation of playing down the angst, the passion, the grandeur. But note that I was careful to use the word "reputation". I often wonder whether those who tend to pass over Kubelik’s Mahler as honourable failure have actually listened hard over a period of time to those recordings. I think if they had they would, in the end, come to agree that whilst Kubelik is certainly excellent at those qualities for which his Mahler is always recognised he is also just as capable of delivering the full "Mahler Monty" as everyone else is. It’s just that he anchors it harder in those very aspects he is praised for, giving the rest a unique canvas on which he can let whole of the music breathe and expand. It’s all a question of perspective. Kubelik’s Mahler takes time, always remember that.

In his studio cycle the First Symphony has always been one of the most enduring. It has appeared over and over again among the top recommendations of many critics, including this one. Many others who tend not to rate Kubelik highly in certain later Mahler Symphonies if they were of a mind to rate his First Symphony might feel constrained to point out that the First is, after all, a "Wunderhorn" symphony and that it is in the "Wunderhorn" mood Kubelik was at his strongest. I don’t disagree with that as an explanation but, as I have said, I think that in Mahler Rafael Kubelik was so much more than a two or three trick pony. In fact in the First Symphony Kubelik’s ability to bring out the grotesques, the heaven stormings and the romance was just as strong as Bernstein or Solti. It’s a case of perspectives again.

The studio First Symphony did have one particular drawback noted by even its most fervent admirers. A drawback it shared with most of the other recordings in the cycle too. It lay in the recorded sound given to the Bavarian Radio Orchestra by the DG engineers in Munich. Balances were close, almost brittle. The brass, trumpets especially, were shrill and raucous. There was an overall "boxy" feeling to the sound picture. I have never been one to dismiss a recording on the basis of recorded sound alone unless literally un-listenable. However, even I regretted the sound that this superb performance had been given. This is not the only reason I am going to recommend this 1979 "live" recording on Audite of the First over the older DG, but it is an important one. At last we can now hear Kubelik’s magnificent interpretation of this symphony, and the response of his excellent orchestra, in beautifully balanced and realistic sound about which I can have no criticism and nothing but praise.

Twelve years after the studio recording Kubelik seems to have taken his interpretation of the work a stage further. Whether it’s a case of "live" performance before an audience leading him to take a few more risks, play a little more to the gallery, or whether it’s simply the fact that he has thought more and more about the work in subsequent performances, I don’t know. What I do know is that every aspect of his interpretation I admired first time around is presented with a degree more certainty, as though the 1967 version was "work in progress" and this is the final statement. (Which, in fact, it was when you consider Kubelik first recorded the work for Decca in Vienna in the 1950s.)

Straight away the opening benefits from the spacious recording with the mellow horns and distant trumpets really giving that sense of otherworldliness that Mahler was surely aiming for. Notice also the woodwinds’ better balancing in the exposition main theme which Kubelik unfolds with a telling degree more lyricism. One interesting point to emerge is that after twelve years Kubelik has decided to dispense with the exposition repeat and it doesn’t appear to be needed. In the development the string slides are done to perfection, as good as Horenstein’s in his old Vox recording. Kubelik also manages an admirable sense of mounting malevolence when the bass drum starts to tap softly. Nature is frightening, Mahler is telling us, and Kubelik agrees. The recapitulation builds inexorably and the coda arrives with great sweep and power. At the end the feeling is that Kubelik has imagined the whole movement in one breath.

The second movement has a well-nigh perfect balance of forward momentum and weight. There is trenchancy here, but there is also a dance element that is so essential to make the music work. Some conductors seem to regard the Trio as a perfunctory interlude, but not Kubelik. He lavishes the same care on this that he lavishes on everything else and the pressing forward he was careful to observe in the main scherzo means he doesn’t need to relax too much in order to give the right sense of respite. There is also an air of the ironic, a feeling we are being given the other side of one coin.

The third movement is one of the most extraordinary pieces of music Mahler ever wrote. The fact that it was amongst his earliest compositions makes it even more astounding. I have always believed that in this movement Mahler announces himself a a truly unique voice for the first time and Kubelik certainly seems to think this in the way he rises to the occasion. He has always appreciated the wonderful colours and sounds that must have so shocked the first audience but in this recording we are, once more, a stage further on in the interpretation than in his previous version. Right at the start he has a double bass soloist prepared to sound truly sinister, more so than in 1971, and one who you can really hear properly also. As the funeral march develops a real sense of middle European horror is laid out before us. All the more sinister for being understated by Mahler but delivered perfectly by a conductor who is prepared to ask his players to sound cheap, to colour the darker tones. This aspect is especially evident in the band interruptions where the bass drum and cymbals have a slightly off-colour Teutonic edge which, when they return after the limpid central section, are even more insinuating and menacing. Kubelik seems to have such confidence in the music that he is able to bring off an effect like this where others don’t. In all it’s a remarkably potent mix that Kubelik and his players deliver in this movement though he never overplays, always anchors in the music’s roots.

In the chaos unleashed at the start of the last movement you can now, once more, hear everything in proper perspective, the brass especially. The ensuing big tune is delivered with all the experience Kubelik has accumulated by this time, but even I caught my breath at how he holds back a little at the restatement. Even though the lovely passage of nostalgic recall just prior to the towering coda expresses a depth and profundity only hinted at in 1967 it is the coda itself which will stay in your mind. As with the studio recording Kubelik is anxious for you to hear what the strings are doing whilst the main power is carried by brass and percussion. Kubelik is also too experienced a Mahlerian to rush the ending. Too many conductors press down on the accelerator here, as if this will make the music more exciting, and how wrong they are to try. Listen to how Kubelik holds on to the tempo just enough to allow every note to tell. He knows this is so much more than just a virtuoso display, that it is a statement of Mahler’s own arrival, and his care and regard for this work from start to finish stays with him to the final note.

This is a top recommendation for this symphony. It supersedes Kubelik’s own studio recording on DG and, I think, surpasses in achievement those by Horenstein (Vox CDX2 5508) and Barbirolli (Dutton CDSJB 1015) to name two other favourite versions I regard as essential to any collection but which must now be thought of as alternatives to this Audite release.

Simply indispensable.
For many Mahlerites over a certain age Rafael Kubelik has always been there, like a dependable uncle, part of the Mahler family landscape for as long

Zeitpunkt Studentenführer | 1/2004 | Beate Hiltner-Hennenberg | January 1, 2004

„Wie mit einem Schlag sind alle Schleusen in mir geöffnet!“ –Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
„Wie mit einem Schlag sind alle Schleusen in mir geöffnet!“ –

Scherzo
Scherzo | Num. 181, Diciembre 2003 | Enrique Pérez Adrián | December 1, 2003 Una versión elocuente, fervorosa y emotiva, otro de los grandes aciertos mahlerianos de este sensacional director
Rafael Kubelik - A la altura de las mejores

Otra entrega más del Mahler en vivo de Kubelik. Esta vez se trata de laMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Otra entrega más del Mahler en vivo de Kubelik. Esta vez se trata de la

Badische Zeitung
Badische Zeitung | 18.11.2003 | Heinz W. Koch | November 18, 2003

... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt schlagartig, wenn man Rafael Kubeliks dreieinhalb Jahrzehnte alte und vorMehr lesen

... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt schlagartig, wenn man Rafael Kubeliks dreieinhalb Jahrzehnte alte und vor einer Weile wiederveröffentlichte Einspielung dagegenhält.

Eine gehörige Überraschung gab’s schon einmal – als nämlich die nie veröffentlichten Münchner Funk-„Meistersinger“ von 1967 plötzlich zu haben waren. Jetzt ist es Gustav Mahlers drei Jahre später eingespieltes „Lied von der Erde“, das erstmals über die Ladentische geht. Es gehört zu einer Mahler Gesamtaufnahme, die offenbar vor der rühmlich bekannten bei der Deutschen Grammophon entstand. Zumindest bei den hier behandelten Sinfonien Nr. 3 und Nr. 6 war das der Fall. Beim „Lied von der Erde“ offeriert das Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, dessen Chef Kubelik damals war, ein erstaunlich präsentes, erstaunlich aufgesplittertes Klangbild, das sowohl das Idyllisch-Graziöse hervorkehrt wie das Schwerblütig-Ausdrucksgesättigte mit großem liedsinfonischem Atem erfüllt – eine erstrangige Wiedergabe.

Auch die beiden 1967/68 erarbeiteten Sinfonien erweisen sich als bestechend durchhörbar. Vielleicht geht Kubelik eine Spur naiver vor als die beim Sezieren der Partitur schärfer verfahrenden Dirigenten wie Gielen, bricht sich, wo es geht, das ererbte böhmische Musikantentum zumindest für Momente Bahn. Da staunt einer eher vor Mahler, als dass er ihn zu zerlegen sucht. Wenn es eine Verwandtschaft gibt, dann ist es die zu Bernstein. Das Triumphale der „Dritten“, das Nostalgische an ihr wird nicht als Artefakt betrachtet, sondern „wie es ist“: Emotion zur Analyse. ...

(aus einer Besprechung mit den Mahler-Interpretationen Michael Gielens)
... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt schlagartig, wenn man Rafael Kubeliks dreieinhalb Jahrzehnte alte und vor

Badische Zeitung
Badische Zeitung | 18.11.2003 | Heinz W. Koch | November 18, 2003

... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt schlagartig, wenn man Rafael Kubeliks dreieinhalb Jahrzehnte alte und vorMehr lesen

... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt schlagartig, wenn man Rafael Kubeliks dreieinhalb Jahrzehnte alte und vor einer Weile wiederveröffentlichte Einspielung dagegenhält.

Eine gehörige Überraschung gab’s schon einmal – als nämlich die nie veröffentlichten Münchner Funk-„Meistersinger“ von 1967 plötzlich zu haben waren. Jetzt ist es Gustav Mahlers drei Jahre später eingespieltes „Lied von der Erde“, das erstmals über die Ladentische geht. Es gehört zu einer Mahler Gesamtaufnahme, die offenbar vor der rühmlich bekannten bei der Deutschen Grammophon entstand. Zumindest bei den hier behandelten Sinfonien Nr. 3 und Nr. 6 war das der Fall. Beim „Lied von der Erde“ offeriert das Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, dessen Chef Kubelik damals war, ein erstaunlich präsentes, erstaunlich aufgesplittertes Klangbild, das sowohl das Idyllisch-Graziöse hervorkehrt wie das Schwerblütig-Ausdrucksgesättigte mit großem liedsinfonischem Atem erfüllt – eine erstrangige Wiedergabe.

Auch die beiden 1967/68 erarbeiteten Sinfonien erweisen sich als bestechend durchhörbar. Vielleicht geht Kubelik eine Spur naiver vor als die beim Sezieren der Partitur schärfer verfahrenden Dirigenten wie Gielen, bricht sich, wo es geht, das ererbte böhmische Musikantentum zumindest für Momente Bahn. Da staunt einer eher vor Mahler, als dass er ihn zu zerlegen sucht. Wenn es eine Verwandtschaft gibt, dann ist es die zu Bernstein. Das Triumphale der „Dritten“, das Nostalgische an ihr wird nicht als Artefakt betrachtet, sondern „wie es ist“: Emotion zur Analyse. ...

(aus einer Besprechung mit den Mahler-Interpretationen Michael Gielens)
... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt schlagartig, wenn man Rafael Kubeliks dreieinhalb Jahrzehnte alte und vor

Badische Zeitung
Badische Zeitung | 18.11.2003 | Heinz W. Koch | November 18, 2003

... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt schlagartig, wenn man Rafael Kubeliks dreieinhalb Jahrzehnte alte und vorMehr lesen

... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt schlagartig, wenn man Rafael Kubeliks dreieinhalb Jahrzehnte alte und vor einer Weile wiederveröffentlichte Einspielung dagegenhält.

Eine gehörige Überraschung gab’s schon einmal – als nämlich die nie veröffentlichten Münchner Funk-„Meistersinger“ von 1967 plötzlich zu haben waren. Jetzt ist es Gustav Mahlers drei Jahre später eingespieltes „Lied von der Erde“, das erstmals über die Ladentische geht. Es gehört zu einer Mahler Gesamtaufnahme, die offenbar vor der rühmlich bekannten bei der Deutschen Grammophon entstand. Zumindest bei den hier behandelten Sinfonien Nr. 3 und Nr. 6 war das der Fall. Beim „Lied von der Erde“ offeriert das Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, dessen Chef Kubelik damals war, ein erstaunlich präsentes, erstaunlich aufgesplittertes Klangbild, das sowohl das Idyllisch-Graziöse hervorkehrt wie das Schwerblütig-Ausdrucksgesättigte mit großem liedsinfonischem Atem erfüllt – eine erstrangige Wiedergabe.

Auch die beiden 1967/68 erarbeiteten Sinfonien erweisen sich als bestechend durchhörbar. Vielleicht geht Kubelik eine Spur naiver vor als die beim Sezieren der Partitur schärfer verfahrenden Dirigenten wie Gielen, bricht sich, wo es geht, das ererbte böhmische Musikantentum zumindest für Momente Bahn. Da staunt einer eher vor Mahler, als dass er ihn zu zerlegen sucht. Wenn es eine Verwandtschaft gibt, dann ist es die zu Bernstein. Das Triumphale der „Dritten“, das Nostalgische an ihr wird nicht als Artefakt betrachtet, sondern „wie es ist“: Emotion zur Analyse. ...

(aus einer Besprechung mit den Mahler-Interpretationen Michael Gielens)
... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt schlagartig, wenn man Rafael Kubeliks dreieinhalb Jahrzehnte alte und vor

levante
levante | A.Gascó | November 14, 2003 Un Mahler muy bien concebido, tocado en vivo

Rafael Kubelik grabó con su orquesta de la Radioifusión Bávara entreMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik grabó con su orquesta de la Radioifusión Bávara entre

CD Compact
CD Compact | n°169 (octobre 2003) | Benjamín Fontvelia | October 1, 2003 Rafael Kubelik/Audite

Sin la aparatosa presencia mediática de Karajan y Bernstein, en su rincónMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Sin la aparatosa presencia mediática de Karajan y Bernstein, en su rincón

Gramophone
Gramophone | October 2003 | Rob Cowan | October 1, 2003 Kubelik takes the Stage

Some years ago I was involved in a discussion concerning Wilhelm Furtwängler's potential artistic heir. Who might he be? There was no lack ofMehr lesen

Some years ago I was involved in a discussion concerning Wilhelm Furtwängler's potential artistic heir. Who might he be? There was no lack of candidates. My suggestion, for the following reasons, was Rafael Kubelik. Both were composers; both preferred an old-fashioned orchestral layout (violins divided, etc) and achieved weight of sonority by allowing a chord to fall naturally rather than slamming it shut. Both favoured flexibility within the bar, an often orgiastic excitability and, most important in this particular context, an overall preference for live performance over recording.

For example, compare Kubelik's 1975 DG studio recording of Beethoven's Fourth Symphony with the Israel Philharmonic with the live Bavarian RSO Audite version of four years later. The IPO account is taut and incisive, with an explosive fortissimo just before the coda (at 5'52", i.e. bar 312) that sounds as if it has been aided from the control desk. Turn then to the BRSO version, the lead-up at around 4'25" to that same passage (here sounding wholly natural), so much more gripping, where second fiddles, violas and cellos thrust their responses to tremolando first fiddles. The energy level is still laudably high but the sense of intense engagement is almost palpable. Again, with the Boston recording of the Fifth, handsome and well played as it undoubtedly is (and with the finale's repeat intact, which isn't the case on Audite), there is little comparison with the freer, airier and more responsive live relay. I'm thinking especially the slow movement, so humble and expressive, almost hymn-like in places – for example, the Bachian string counterpoint from 4'27''. Also, the Boston recording places first and second violins on the left: the Audite option has them divided, as per Kubelik’s preferred norm.

Audite’s Tchaikovsky coupling is an out-and-out winner. Kubelik made two studio recordings of the Fourth Symphony (with the Chicago SO and Vienna PO), both set around a lyrical axis, but this live version has a unique emotive impetuosity, especially in the development section of the first movement. The Andantino relates a burning nostalgia without exaggeration, whereas the scherzo – taken at a real lick – becomes a quiet choir of balalaikas. The April 1969 performance of the Violin Concerto was also Pinchas Zukerman's German début and aside from Kubelik's facilitating responsiveness, there's the warmth and immediacy of the youthful Zukerman's tone and the precision of his bowing. Both performances confirm Kubelik as among the most sympathetic of Tchaikovsky conductors, a genuine listener who relates what he hears, not what he wants to confess through the music.

Much the same might be said of Kubelik's Mahler, whether for DG or the various live alternatives currently appearing on Audite. In the case of ‘Das Lied von der Erde’ there is no DG predecessor, but even if there was, I doubt that it would surpass the live relay of February 1970 with Waldemar Kmentt and Dame Janet Baker, so dashing, pliant and deeply felt, whether in the subtly traced clarinet counterpoint near the start of ‘Von der Jugend’ or the way Baker re-emerges after the funereal processional in ‘Der Abschied’, as if altered forever by a profound visitation.
Some years ago I was involved in a discussion concerning Wilhelm Furtwängler's potential artistic heir. Who might he be? There was no lack of

CD Compact
CD Compact | n°169 (octobre 2003) | Benjamín Fontvelia | October 1, 2003 Rafael Kubelik/Audite

Sin la aparatosa presencia mediática de Karajan y Bernstein, en su rincónMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Sin la aparatosa presencia mediática de Karajan y Bernstein, en su rincón

Scherzo
Scherzo | N° 179, Octubre 2003 | Enrique Pérez Adrián | October 1, 2003

Magnífica recreación instrumental, conceptual y expresiva, otro soberbioMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Magnífica recreación instrumental, conceptual y expresiva, otro soberbio

Scherzo
Scherzo | N° 178, Septiembre 2003 | Enrique Pérez Adrián | September 1, 2003 Una gran versión que sin duda hará mella espiritual en cualquier oyente sensible que se acerque a ella
Mathis, Brendel, Kmentt, Baker y Kubelik - Dos nuevas dianas

Audite nos trae dos nuevos conciertos de Rafael Kubelik de los años 70, deMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Audite nos trae dos nuevos conciertos de Rafael Kubelik de los años 70, de

www.musicweb-international.com
www.musicweb-international.com | 01.08.2003 | Gerald Fenech | August 1, 2003

Kubelik's Mahler credentials have long been established ever since his trailblazing Decca recording of the First with the VPO in 1957 indeed manyMehr lesen

Kubelik's Mahler credentials have long been established ever since his trailblazing Decca recording of the First with the VPO in 1957 indeed many collectors still prefer that version to others for its verve and drive. This 1981 live relay from Munich shows the Czech conductor at his most inspired with the orchestra that was part of his life for most of his recording career. The bold strokes of the Trauermarsch are magnificent in their eerie solemnity with a rich resonant recording aiding the imposing nature of the music no end. 'Sturmisch bewegt' is constructive and fullsome although other conductors like Karajan and Bernstien have brought greater character to his music, indeed Kubelik's own previous 1967 recording was much more involved. The Scherzo moves about with terrific swagger, the BRSO horns have a field day and the contributions of the strings are also quite dizzying. In the famous Adagietto, Kubelik almost finds a heavenly pace; this is music from another planet in such a conductor's hands. One cannot fault the Finale for its irresistible rhythmic verve and drive that bring the work to an end in typically vigorous fashion. Audite's recording is admirably clear and extremely vivid, indeed the famous spacious acoustic of the Herkulessaal is quite dazzlingly captured. There is a whole host of Fifths in the bargain and mid-price range but this recording demands to be heard, both as a souvenir of Kubelik's immense charisma and for its place as a unique testament of Mahler conducting to range alongside the Bernsteins, Soltis and Karajans of the past century.
Kubelik's Mahler credentials have long been established ever since his trailblazing Decca recording of the First with the VPO in 1957 indeed many

Scherzo
Scherzo | N° 175, Mayo 2003 | Enrique Pérez Adrián | May 1, 2003

Kubelik logra con su sabiduría e instinto una unidad y convicción queMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Kubelik logra con su sabiduría e instinto una unidad y convicción que

Scherzo
Scherzo | N° 175, Mayo 2003 | Enrique Pérez Adrián | May 1, 2003

El sello alemán Audite comienza ahora a ser distribuido en España y loMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
El sello alemán Audite comienza ahora a ser distribuido en España y lo

Flensborg Avis
Flensborg Avis | 09.04.2003 | Lars Geerdes | April 9, 2003 Skelsættende tysk Mahlerindspilning genudgivet
Live-optagelse fra 1970 kan nu købes på cd

Da dirigenten Rafael Kubelik (1914-1996) i 1961 tiltrådte stillingen somMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Da dirigenten Rafael Kubelik (1914-1996) i 1961 tiltrådte stillingen som

www.musicweb-international.com
www.musicweb-international.com | 01.04.2003 | Tony Duggan | April 1, 2003

Here is one of the great "lost" Mahler recordings now properly restored. When Rafael Kubelik made his outstanding studio Mahler cycle in Munich for DGMehr lesen

Here is one of the great "lost" Mahler recordings now properly restored. When Rafael Kubelik made his outstanding studio Mahler cycle in Munich for DG in the 1970s (463 738-2) he made no version of "Das Lied Von Der Erde" to go with it. This was puzzling for such a great Mahlerian who even went to the trouble of recording the Adagio from the Tenth Symphony as part of his cycle. We knew Kubelik played the work because this performance had taken place in Munich in February 1970 with Kubelik’s Bavarian Radio Orchestra and first appeared, minus a minute or two in the fourth movement and in poor sound, on a pirate label in the 1980s. A number of Kubelik’s studio Mahler recordings were made after "live" performances in the same hall at this very time (as other Audite releases have shown) so why didn’t Kubelik, the orchestra and his two soloists go on to record it for DG under studio conditions? I wonder if the answer lies in the presence of Janet Baker. At that time Baker was an exclusive EMI artist. Were plans afoot for her to record it with Kubelik but these came to nothing because of that? I know she later recorded the work with Bernard Haitink for Philips but that was some years later when perhaps contract problems were resolvable. Whatever, I know that ever since I heard the pirate version of this performance I had hoped that at some point someone would gain access to the Bavarian Radio master tapes and release them. That is what has now happened and this recording of Mahler’s late masterpiece now joins a nearly-completed "live" Mahler cycle conducted by Kubelik from various times during his Munich tenure released by Audite.


For me Janet Baker has always been the greatest interpreter of the female/baritone songs in this work. Her Philips recording with Haitink on Eloquence (468 182-2) was long awaited even when it appeared and did not disappoint her admirers. In my survey of recordings of this work I believe I paid that version the attention it deserved singling out Baker for special praise. However even then I felt her interpretation on a BBC Radio Classics release taken from a later "live" performance in Manchester and conducted by Raymond Leppard was even better – deeper, more profound. The problem was that in no way could the BBC Northern Symphony Orchestra compare with the Concertgebouw, or her conductor Raymond Leppard compare with Bernard Haitink even though hearing Baker "live" seemed to add something to her interpretation. This was partly why when I heard the "pirate" of this Munich version I hoped for an official release. This too is "live" with all the benefit that brings but this time we have in Kubelik a Mahlerian of equal stature to Haitink and in the Bavarian Radio an orchestra that comes close to the Concertgebouw in depth of response to Mahler’s sound world. Matched with Waldemar Kmentt she also appears with a tenor who is, for me, superior to James King on the Haitink version and John Mitchinson on the Leppard, fine though both are.


The key to the greatness of Janet Baker in this work is her total identification with the words. Her care for every detail of them means she lives the part where some merely describe it. Her view of the music seems from the inside out. In these movements one thinks of Baker, Ludwig and Fassbaender among the women and Fischer-Dieskau among the men. In the second song you are made to feel what it is to be lonely rather than simply have loneliness described to you. Technically too she is on top form as the wild horses passage in "Von der Schönheit" proves. At no point in this crazy music does Baker ever give the impression that she will come to grief, even though the tempo adopted by her and Kubelik is suitably swift. They had one shot at this in front of an audience and it comes off triumphantly. Listen also to the delicacy of the description of the young girls swimming in the same movement. Finally in the "Abschied" her range, emotional and musical is total. Everything is covered here from the passages of sterile enunciation to the overwhelming emotional grandeur of the climaxes and all points between subtly graded. Overall this is one of those interpretations that contain depths that will take years to plumb.


Of all the great recordings of this work I know there has, for me, so far only been one where I feel that two of the greatest interpreters are matched on the same recording. These are Christa Ludwig and Fritz Wunderlich for Klemperer on EMI. But now with this release I think there is a second since Waldemar Kmentt is just as convincing in his songs as Janet Baker is in hers. In fact I believe Kmentt can be compared with Wunderlich, Peter Schreier and Julius Patzak as the finest interpreters in the tenor songs on record. In "Das Trinklied" Kmentt is towering, challenging the music to break him in the dramatic sections, but emerging unscathed from them. The "Dark is life, is death" refrain has a world-weary depth that few save Schreier and Wunderlich can match and the "ape on the grave" climax is fearless in his nightmarish delivery. Like Baker, Kmentt can also walk the delicate passages of this work with equal effect. His description of the arrival of spring in "Der Trunkene im Fruhling" is magical and his word painting in "Von Der Jugend" piquant and sharp.


Kubelik’s greatness as a Mahler conductor was his ability to cover the whole range of the music from uncomplicated nature painting to calculated high drama and seem equally at home everywhere. He attends to all details of this music with care and discretion, always taking care of the bigger picture too, balancing it with the inner detail. Notice the woodwinds during the funeral march in "Der Abscheid" where every strand is clearly delineated, or the effect of getting his mandolin to play tremolo in the same movement marking up the chinoiserie in a most evocative and unique way. He also recognises what I have always believed to be a crucial aspect of this work. That the two soloists are the equal partners with the conductor and that he is there to support them. With great soloists like these, that is easier. But countless examples of his support for his soloists are apparent in this performance along with the preparation of his orchestra to act almost as a third soloist. The purely instrumental passages in "Der Abschied" reveal Mahler conducting of the highest order. Listen to the birds passage and also to the deep bass growls before the funeral march.


The sound recording leaves little to be desired. It is hard to tell it was made over thirty years ago for radio broadcast. I like the balances between woodwind and strings and the warmth of the acoustic around the orchestra and soloists in the chamber-like sections. The balance between soloists and orchestra are exemplary also. Even the distinctive acoustic of the Herkulessaal is made to sound perfectly suited to the music. You can hear everything and with solo players in the orchestra as eloquent as the two singers are this is important and adds another plus to this disc. In sound terms this more than matches the best versions of this work and musically it is the equal of Klemperer on EMI (5 66892 2), Sanderling on Berlin Classics (0094022BC) and Horenstein on BBC Legends (BBCL 4042-2). All very different though each one of those comparable versions are in their interpretative approach. Indeed, this Kubelik recording has the effect of taking many of the virtues of all those great recordings and stitching them into a new and deeply satisfying whole.


This is one of the all-time great Mahler recordings: a classic version of this inexhaustible masterpiece in every way. Indeed I think there are none to surpass it, perhaps only to equal it. You will be moved, delighted and changed by it. I cannot recommend it too highly as it goes to the top of my list for this work.
Here is one of the great "lost" Mahler recordings now properly restored. When Rafael Kubelik made his outstanding studio Mahler cycle in Munich for DG

Nordsee-Zeitung
Nordsee-Zeitung | Nr. 57/2003 | Sebastian Loskant | March 8, 2003

Es war ein Tscheche, der den Münchenern den Spätromantiker Gustav MahlerMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Es war ein Tscheche, der den Münchenern den Spätromantiker Gustav Mahler

Das Orchester | 3/2003 | Johannes Killyen | March 1, 2003

Um eines von Gustav Mahlers großen Werken neu auf dem übersättigtenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Um eines von Gustav Mahlers großen Werken neu auf dem übersättigten

klassik.com | 24.02.2003 | Erik Daumann | February 24, 2003 | source: http://magazin.k... Der Visionär

Gustav Mahler komponierte seine dritte Symphonie in den Sommermonaten derMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Gustav Mahler komponierte seine dritte Symphonie in den Sommermonaten der

Die Rheinpfalz
Die Rheinpfalz | 12.02.2003 | Gerhard Tetzlaf | February 12, 2003 Idealer Interpret – Livemitschnitte unter Rafael Kubelik

Die Gesamtaufnahme der Sinfonien Gustav Mahlers durch Rafael Kubelik undMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Gesamtaufnahme der Sinfonien Gustav Mahlers durch Rafael Kubelik und

Die Rheinpfalz
Die Rheinpfalz | 12.02.2003 | Gerhard Tetzlaf | February 12, 2003 Idealer Interpret – Livemitschnitte unter Rafael Kubelik

Die Gesamtaufnahme der Sinfonien Gustav Mahlers durch Rafael Kubelik undMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Gesamtaufnahme der Sinfonien Gustav Mahlers durch Rafael Kubelik und

Die Rheinpfalz
Die Rheinpfalz | 12.02.2003 | Gerhard Tetzlaf | February 12, 2003 Idealer Interpret – Livemitschnitte unter Rafael Kubelik

Die Gesamtaufnahme der Sinfonien Gustav Mahlers durch Rafael Kubelik undMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Gesamtaufnahme der Sinfonien Gustav Mahlers durch Rafael Kubelik und

Die Rheinpfalz
Die Rheinpfalz | 12.02.2003 | Gerhard Tetzlaf | February 12, 2003 Idealer Interpret – Livemitschnitte unter Rafael Kubelik

Die Gesamtaufnahme der Sinfonien Gustav Mahlers durch Rafael Kubelik undMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Gesamtaufnahme der Sinfonien Gustav Mahlers durch Rafael Kubelik und

Westfalen-Blatt
Westfalen-Blatt | Nr. 25/2003 | Ingo Schmitz | January 30, 2003

Eine schlichte schwarze Blechplatte ziert seit wenigen Tagen dasMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Eine schlichte schwarze Blechplatte ziert seit wenigen Tagen das

Stereoplay
Stereoplay | 1/2003 | Ulrich Schreiber | January 1, 2003

Marktpolitisch mag der Audite-Versuch, dem von der DG im Studio fixiertenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Marktpolitisch mag der Audite-Versuch, dem von der DG im Studio fixierten

klassik.com | 19.12.2002 | Erik Daumann | December 19, 2002 | source: http://magazin.k... Von Böhme zu Böhme

Das Label ‚audite’ des Diplom-Tonmeisters Ludger Böckenhoff ausMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Label ‚audite’ des Diplom-Tonmeisters Ludger Böckenhoff aus

WDR 3
WDR 3 | 03.12.2002 | Michael Schwalb | December 3, 2002

Hörproben-Neue CDs, am Mikrophon Michael Schwalb. Mitgebracht habe ichMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Hörproben-Neue CDs, am Mikrophon Michael Schwalb. Mitgebracht habe ich

klassik-heute.com
klassik-heute.com | 02.12.2002 | Mario Gerteis | December 2, 2002

In der ersten Mahler-Welle auf (Stereo-)Schallplatten spielte derMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
In der ersten Mahler-Welle auf (Stereo-)Schallplatten spielte der

International Record Review
International Record Review | 12/2002 | Graham Simpson | December 1, 2002

Despite the (necessary!) tailing off in complete cycles over the last decade, recordings of Mahler symphonies are far from drying up. Rafael KubelíkMehr lesen

Despite the (necessary!) tailing off in complete cycles over the last decade, recordings of Mahler symphonies are far from drying up. Rafael Kubelík and Claudio Abbado recorded the first and second such cycles for DG ­ in a period, from the late 1960s to the early 1990s, during which Mahler passed unstoppably from the periphery to the epicentre of today's musical culture.

As with his live Sixth Symphony (reviewed in June 2002), Kubelík's live Third is contemporary with his studio account ­ still among the most spontaneous on disc. Similar virtues are in evidence here, though some will question the rushed ascents to the Kräftig's climactic peaks (listen from 11'51" and 27'00"), which undermine an otherwise fluid, coherent approach to this too-often sprawling movement. The Menuetto's coda (8'26") is winsome, while the posthorn interludes of the Comodo (5'32" and 12'51") have a repose to contrast with the fantasy that Kubelík captures elsewhere. Marjorie Thomas is thoughtful rather than profound in the Nietzsche setting, and the balance of boys' and women's voices in the Wunderhorn movement lacks definition. Kubelík again rushes his fences in the finale's central climax (13'42"), but there's no doubting his overall command of form and expression. String playing is assured throughout, though wind intonation in the closing pages (21'09") is raw to say the least.

This is something that could not be levelled at any stage of Claudio Abbado's live traversal: indeed, the fastidious balance and clarity of texture are remarkable even by his standards. An emotional detachment is evident in the opening movement ­ notably the central development (15'46"), where Abbado evinces little of the character or imagination of Kubelík. After a powerfully sustained reprise (23'42"), the coda is curiously stolid, lacking the joyful discharge of energy essential at this point. The Menuetto, pellucid in tone and manner, is perfectly judged; the Comodo lacking in an imaginative dimension, and with a posthorn balance (listen from 5'21") so distant as to be more a timbral shading than a melodic contour. Abbado's way with the Nietzsche setting ­ a tensile arioso, with Anna Larsson ideally poised between agitation and restraint ­ is spellbinding, as is the glinting aggression drawn from the orchestral passage after the Wunderhorn movement's central section (2'16"). In the finale, the inner intensity of the Berlin Philharmonic's playing, and the unerring pacing across its 22-minute span secure an apotheosis that eluded Abbado in his disappointingly bland Vienna account. The audience is suitably impressed, though to retain three minutes of applause on disc does seem excessive.

The sound on the Audite release is decent and not too scrawny, and there are inscrutable booklet notes from Erich Mauermann: worth hearing, though Kubelík's studio account should be made available as a competitive 'twofer'. The DG engineers have worked hard to open up the notoriously cramped Royal Festival Hall acoustic ­ and if the results convey little sense of a specific acoustic, balance of ensemble in a believable ambience makes for a sympathetic listen, enhanced by comprehensive notes from Donald Mitchell. This is a recording which can rank high, if not quite with the best, of those listed.
Despite the (necessary!) tailing off in complete cycles over the last decade, recordings of Mahler symphonies are far from drying up. Rafael Kubelík

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 11/02 | Christian Wildhagen | November 1, 2002 Glücksgriff

Dieser Live-Mitschnitt stellt eine echte Erweiterung der Kubelik-Diskographie dar, denn "Das Lied von der Erde" fehlt in seinem Studio-Mahler-Zyklus.Mehr lesen

Dieser Live-Mitschnitt stellt eine echte Erweiterung der Kubelik-Diskographie dar, denn "Das Lied von der Erde" fehlt in seinem Studio-Mahler-Zyklus. Kubeliks Lesart zählt fraglos zu den bleibenden Einspielungen dieses bewegenden Werks. Ihm standen in Janet Baker und Waldemar Kmentt zwei ausgezeichnete Solisten zur Verfügung. Zwar reicht Kmentt nicht an Fritz Wunderlich heran, doch für eine unretuschierte Live-Aufnahme bewältigt er den schwierigen Tenorpart mehr als achtbar und überzeugt auch durch sensible dynamische Schattierungen. Janet Baker kann sich dagegen durchaus mit Kathleen Ferrier und Christa Ludwig messen, einige wenige Schärfen in der Höhe nicht gerechnet.
Dieser Live-Mitschnitt stellt eine echte Erweiterung der Kubelik-Diskographie dar, denn "Das Lied von der Erde" fehlt in seinem Studio-Mahler-Zyklus.

Fanfare | November/December 2002 | Christopher Abbot | November 1, 2002

Like Audite’s disc of Kubelik’s Mahler Sixth (reviewed in 25:5), this recording was made at a concert that preceded the studio recording ofMehr lesen

Like Audite’s disc of Kubelik’s Mahler Sixth (reviewed in 25:5), this recording was made at a concert that preceded the studio recording of Mahler’s Third issued by DG as part of Kubelik’s complete cycle. And like the performance of Mahler’s Sixth, this one illuminates many facets of its conductor’s art.

Kubelik’s performances of the “massive” Mahler—the Second, Third, and Eighth—were less purely monumental than either Solti or Bernstein, his contemporaries in the early Mahler-cycle stakes. Kubelik often celebrates the smaller, finer gestures, so the sense of struggle between elemental forces in the first movement of the Third isn’t as pronounced as it is with the other two, especially Bernstein. Unfortunately, the sound on this new disc makes less of an impact than that on DG: The orchestra is recessed, so that the imperious horn calls and march are less so. Orchestral detailing is notable, but there are several rough patches where intonation is less than secure. There are occasions in the development where the tempo seems rushed—the sense of momentum isn’t organic. This is less of a problem on the DG recording.

Not surprisingly, the minuet is exquisite on the DG. It is no less so on the Audite, where the stereo image is just as sharp (though tape hiss is a distraction). The sound on Audite is somewhat thin, adding a metallic sheen to the winds. The playful Scherzo is also delightful, full of the small gestures I alluded to, such as the perfectly judged post horn solos. Marjorie Thomas contributes an “O Mensch!” that is fully characterized, though her voice seems to emerge from an echo chamber; the balance between choruses on “Es sungen drei Engel” is also problematic, with the women dominating the boys. Kubelik’s employment of divided violins makes the all-important string writing extra clear in the final Adagio. His is an interpretation not without emotion, but with an overall sense of balance that works extremely well.

As with the previous Audite Mahler/Kubelik, this disc is primarily of historic value, vital for those who don’t already own the DG set. It is an interpretation worth hearing, with the caveats concerning the sound as noted above.
Like Audite’s disc of Kubelik’s Mahler Sixth (reviewed in 25:5), this recording was made at a concert that preceded the studio recording of

Rondo
Rondo | 17.10.202 | Matthias Kornemann | October 17, 2002

Viele Dirigenten hat es am Jahrhundertende angezogen, dieses "Lied von derMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Viele Dirigenten hat es am Jahrhundertende angezogen, dieses "Lied von der

Classic Record Collector
Classic Record Collector | 10/2002 | Christopher Breunig | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

Classic Record Collector
Classic Record Collector | 10/2002 | Christopher Breunig | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

International Record Review
International Record Review | 10/2002 | Christopher Breuning | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

International Record Review
International Record Review | 10/2002 | Christopher Breuning | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

International Record Review
International Record Review | 10/2002 | Christopher Breuning | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is ‘Das Lied von der Erde’, since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version; and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. ‘Der Einsame im Herbst’ may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.
Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik's DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now (Collector 463 738-2, ten discs) and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth (Audite 95471), made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning finale). No. 1 on DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pal of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No.7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No.5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterised, the finale a riotous display.
Some critics feet that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’ which may seem so in comparison with, say, Chailly's Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein's. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!
As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale of No. 3. one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have that same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have beard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender's account of the ‘Urlicht’.
Nowadays, every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler's Fifth Symphony as a Showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter's 78rpm set was the collector's only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by the horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9m 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is
heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere the engineers reduced dynamic levels.
Tahra's booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik's career. Audite's have full description of the works with texts for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

International Record Review
International Record Review | 10/2002 | Christopher Breuning | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

International Record Review
International Record Review | 10/2002 | Christopher Breuning | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | 10.2002 | Rémy Franck | October 1, 2002 Optimistisches 'Lied von der Erde'

Kubelik hat für die Deutsche Grammophon die Mahler-Symphonien aufgenommen, nicht aber 'Das Lied von der Erde'. Nachdem uns etliche derMehr lesen

Kubelik hat für die Deutsche Grammophon die Mahler-Symphonien aufgenommen, nicht aber 'Das Lied von der Erde'. Nachdem uns etliche der Liveproduktionen der Symphonien bei 'audite' bereits weitaus mehr begeistert hatten als die Studio-Einspielungen der DG, warteten wir gespannt auf dieses für unsere Ohren nun wirklich neue Tondokument. Und die Begeisterung könnte nicht größer sein: so prächtig hat das Mahler-Orchester in dieser Partitur selten geklungen. Kubelik taucht die Musik völlig unpathetisch in ein gleißendes Licht. Das 'Lied von der Erde' klingt daher unerhört neu: das Orchester ist von stupender Klarheit, fast kammermusikalisch fein ziseliert, von bestechender Reinheit und ohne jede dunkeln Gedanken. Gerade dadurch wirkt Kubeliks Interpretation so anders, so neu: frei von jeglicher Sentimentalität zelebriert er keinen Trauerdienst, sondern gibt Mahlers Musik einen eher optimistischen, in die Zukunft weisenden Charakter. Erstaunlicherweise bleibt sogar Janet Bakers Stimme hier hell und lichtstark, und Waldemar Kmentt - in großer Form - singt ohne Anstrengung, ohne theatralische Geste, sehr stilvoll und ohne jede störende Akzentuierung, weil er in diesem kammermusikalisch transparenten orchestralen Umfeld einen sicheren Platz hat.

Audite legt also mit dieser CD eine in der Interpretationsgeschichte vom 'Lied von der Erde' eine essentielle Interpretation vor, die unsere Sicht auf dieses von Mahler als sein persönlichstes Werk bezeichnete Komposition völlig erneuert.
Kubelik hat für die Deutsche Grammophon die Mahler-Symphonien aufgenommen, nicht aber 'Das Lied von der Erde'. Nachdem uns etliche der

International Record Review
International Record Review | 10/2002 | Christopher Breuning | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

Classic Record Collector
Classic Record Collector | 10/2002 | Christopher Breunig | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

International Record Review
International Record Review | 10/2002 | Christopher Breuning | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is ‘Das Lied von der Erde’, since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version; and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. ‘Der Einsame im Herbst’ may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.
Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik's DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now (Collector 463 738-2, ten discs) and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth (Audite 95471), made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning finale). No. 1 on DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pal of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No.7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No.5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterised, the finale a riotous display.
Some critics feet that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’ which may seem so in comparison with, say, Chailly's Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein's. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!
As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale of No. 3. one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have that same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have beard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender's account of the ‘Urlicht’.
Nowadays, every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler's Fifth Symphony as a Showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter's 78rpm set was the collector's only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by the horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9m 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is
heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere the engineers reduced dynamic levels.
Tahra's booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik's career. Audite's have full description of the works with texts for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

International Record Review
International Record Review | 10/2002 | Christopher Breuning | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

Classic Record Collector
Classic Record Collector | 10/2002 | Christopher Breunig | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

Classic Record Collector
Classic Record Collector | 10/2002 | Christopher Breuning | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

Classic Record Collector
Classic Record Collector | 10/2002 | Christopher Breunig | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

Répertoire
Répertoire | No 161 | Gérard Belvire | October 1, 2002

Avec Bernstein, Solti et Haitink, Kubelik fait partie des chefs «Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Avec Bernstein, Solti et Haitink, Kubelik fait partie des chefs «

Classic Record Collector
Classic Record Collector | 10/2002 | Christopher Breunig | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

Classic Record Collector
Classic Record Collector | 10/2002 | Christopher Breunig | October 1, 2002

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings ofMehr lesen

The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of four Mozart and two Beethoven concertos. Of particular interest here is 'Das Lied von der Erde', since Kubelik did not record it for DG. Janet Baker fans will welcome a third CD version: and she sounds truly inspired by her conductor. 'Der Einsame im Herbst' may not have the sheer beauty of the version with Haitink but the finale surpasses most on records, with a real sense of the transcendental at the close. Kmentt too makes the most of his words; and the reedy Munich winds suit this score.

Recorded between 1967 and 1971, Kubelik’s DG cycle has been at budget price for some time now and the Audite alternatives of 1, 5 and 7 have been in the shops for months. The NHK-recorded Ninth, made during a 1975 Tokyo visit by the Bavarian RSO, was reviewed in CRC, Spring 2001 (I found the sound unfocused and the brass pinched in sound, but welcomed in particular playing ‘ablaze’ after the visionary episode in the Rondo burleske and a crowning final). No. 1 in DG is widely admired but this 1979 version is more poetic still, wonderfully so in the introduction and trio at (II). There is something of a pall of resonance in place of applause, cut from all these Audite transfers. In No. 7 the balance is more airy than DG’s multi-miked productions, and (as in No. 5) Kubelik sounds less constrained than when working under studio conditions, although rhythm in the opening bars of (II) goes awry and the very opening note is succeeded by a sneeze! The disturbing and more shadowy extremes are more vividly characterized, the finale a riotous display.

Some critics feel that Kubelik gives us ‘Mahler-lite’, which may seem in comparison with, say, Chailly’s Decca cycle or the recent BPO/Abbado Third on DG – not to mention Bernstein’s. But there is plenty of energy here, and the divided strings with basses set to the rear left give openness to textures. However, the strings are not opulent and the trumpets are often piercing. It would be fair to say that Kubelik conducted Mahler as if it were Mozart!

As it happens, in the most controversial of his readings, No. 6, the DG is preferable to the Audite, where Kubelik projects little empathy with its slow movement and where the Scherzo is less cohesive. The real problem is that the very fast speed for (I) affects ail subsequent tempo relationships. Nor does the finale on No. 3, one of the glories of the DG cycle, quite have the same radiance; the singers are the same, the Tölz Boys making a sound one imagines Mahler must have heard in his head, and this performance predates the DG by one month. Nevertheless, these newer issues of Nos 2 and 3 are worth hearing, the ‘Resurrection’ not least for Brigitte Fassbaender’s account of ‘Urlicht’.

Nowadays every orchestra visiting London seems to programme Mahler’s Fifth Symphony as a showpiece, but in 1951 (when Bruno Walter’s 78rpm set was the collector’s only choice) a performance would surely have been uncommon even at the Concertgebouw – Mengelberg was prohibited from conducting in Holland from 1946 until he died that year. Although the start of (V) is marred by horns, this is an interesting, well executed account with a weightier sound, from what one can surmise through the inevitable dimness – the last note of (I) is almost inaudible. The three versions vary sufficiently to quote true timings (none is given by Tahra): (I) 11m 34s/12m 39s/11m 35s (Tahra/Audite/DG); (II) 13m/14m 52s/13m 52s; (III) 15m 56s/17m 54s/17m 23s; (IV) 9m 24s/10m 24s/9mm 44s); (V) 14m 26s/14m 57s/15m 29s. The live Munich version is tidier than on DG; the spectral imagery in (III) is heavier in effect, too; and in the Adagietto the dynamic and phrasing shadings and poetic quality of the string playing also give the live performance the edge. Towards the end of the finale, and elsewhere, the engineers reduced dynamic levels.

Tahra’s booklet comprises an untidily set-out synopsis of Kubelik’s career. Audite’s have full descriptions of the works with text for Nos 2 and 3, and different back-cover colour portraits of the conductor.
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of Mahler symphonies (sans 4 or 8), but valuable Kubelik/Curzon readings of

Gramophone
Gramophone | 9/2002 | Richard Fairman | September 1, 2002 Das Lied live from two great Mahler conductors‚ more spontaneous sounding than their studio versions

Audite is in the process of assembling a complete Mahler cycle with Kubelík and the Bavarian RSO from radio relays. So far the recordings date acrossMehr lesen

Audite is in the process of assembling a complete Mahler cycle with Kubelík and the Bavarian RSO from radio relays. So far the recordings date across a period of 15 years‚ with this Das Lied von der Erde‚ broadcast in February 1970‚ among the earliest. Kubelík’s Mahler is heard here at its most typical‚ so much at ease with the sound­world and tempo of the music that other conductors can seem heavy­ handed by comparison. It is at the other extreme from the explosive collision of emotions that makes Bernstein’s recordings so intense and choppy: Kubelík is natural‚ easy­going‚ fresh in his delight at the score’s exquisite detail. Although the poems of Das Lied refer to several seasons‚ this performance surely belongs to the spring‚ when ‘the dear earth everywhere blooms… and grows green again’. Waldemar Kmentt is strong and sure in the tenor songs but rather pedestrian. There is not much sense of wide­eyed wonder at the arrival of spring or uninhibited hedonism as the wine is being poured. Dame Janet Baker already features on several other recordings‚ including a live broadcast on BBC Legends‚ but no two of her performances of this work were the same. Here‚ in 1970‚ she sings with much pure‚ vocal beauty and a desire for intimacy that is remarkable in a large concert­hall. In the second song the close to each rising phrase is beautifully handled. The fourth song is graceful‚ though less sensuous than on her Philips recording under Haitink. In the final ‘Abschied’ the voice truly sails ‘wie eine Silberbarke’ on hushed legato lines shimmering with intensity.

Some may prefer to stick with studio recordings of Das Lied‚ where the orchestra has had the luxury of extra takes to polish every detail‚ but there are no complaints about the Bavarian orchestra here. There are also a few studio recordings (Karajan and the Solti among them) that perform technical somersaults to end up with a recorded balance less satisfying than here.
Audite is in the process of assembling a complete Mahler cycle with Kubelík and the Bavarian RSO from radio relays. So far the recordings date across

Diapason
Diapason | Septembre 2002 | Jean-Charles Hoffele | September 1, 2002

Deutsche Gramophon ne permit pas à Kubelik d’enregistrer « Le Chant de la terre », qui aurait constitué le point d’orgue de son cycle Mahler ;Mehr lesen

Deutsche Gramophon ne permit pas à Kubelik d’enregistrer « Le Chant de la terre », qui aurait constitué le point d’orgue de son cycle Mahler ; la firme hambourgeoise avait confié l’œuvre en 1962 à Jochum (sa seule gravure mahlérienne) et au Concertgebouw, avec Merriman et Haefliger. Dans ce concert de février 1970, Kubelik, selon un parti pris qu’il soutint tout au long de son intégrale, refuse tout pathos, tout morbidité ; il expose la partition en pleine lumière, radiographiant les mises en abyme de l’orchestre mahlérien avec une précision expressive qui donne le vertige. A ce titre, le vaste interlude du lied ultime est exemplaire par sa parfaite limpidité ; l’émotion qu’il dégage ne provient pas d’une surcharge d’affect (comme chez Bernstein ou Walter) mais d’un regard lucide, implacable et néanmoins compatissant.

Porté par cet orchestre éclairé, l’alto de Baker ose un chant rayonnant, débarrassé de toute tentation d’assombrir le timbre (ce qu’elle réussissait admirablement avec Haitink, Philips), magnifié par une petite harmonie et des violons tenus par la direction sostenuto de Kubelik, qui semble omniprésente dans toutes les pupitres de l’orchestre, à tous les instants, distillant une immense musique du chambre. Kmentt, en grande voix, tranchant, héroïque, impressionne durablement et ne pâlit ni devant la beauté absolue de Wunderlich ni devant le « sprechgesang » enflammé de Patzak. Dans la plénitude de son geste, Kubelik entend « Le Chant de la terre » comme une partition ouverture sur l’avenir, tournant les dos aux vastes thrènes funèbres des grandes versions de l’œuvre, sentimentaux et étreignant (Walter, Bernstein, Haitink), minéraux et tragiques (Reiner, Klemperer). Il renouvelle totalement notre vision d’une partition-clé du début du siècle.
Deutsche Gramophon ne permit pas à Kubelik d’enregistrer « Le Chant de la terre », qui aurait constitué le point d’orgue de son cycle Mahler ;

Gramophone
Gramophone | 08/2002 | David Gutman | August 1, 2002 Undercharcterised Mahler from Kubelik

Do you remember the 1960s? A time before Mahler symphony series were two-a-penny, when conductors like Abravanel, Bernstein, Haitink and Solti vied toMehr lesen

Do you remember the 1960s? A time before Mahler symphony series were two-a-penny, when conductors like Abravanel, Bernstein, Haitink and Solti vied to be the first to complete the intégrale on LP (not that any of them would have thought of including Deryck Cooke's performing version of the Tenth)? Rafael Kubelik's ground-breaking DG cycle was generally (though not universally) rated a highlight of his period as chief conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (1961-79). More recently, the conductor's Mahlerian credentials have been boosted by the appearance of some memorable live concert relays, including a quite outstanding (albeit repeat-shy) account of the First Symphony and a Fifth full of insight (Audite, 4/00). I cannot say that the present release holds comparable interest. Its source is a well-preserved, bass-light Bavarian Radio tape dating from the same period as DG's studio sessions. Hence it offers neither an alternative interpretative slant on the work nor even a radically different sonic experience.

True, the conductor excels himself in the slow movement. Here you'll find the luminous string tone, natural pacing and inner simplicity of his best work, along with sonic unvarnished wind and brass playing. (Don't forget how unfamiliar this music must have been at the time: the Sixth had to wait until 1966 for its French première). The eccentric booklet notes tell us that this Andante moderato 'takes off the stifling corset that prevents one from breathing freely in the other movements'. This isn't - I think - meant to allude to Kubelik's brisk, inflexible pacing, but I found such an approach problematical, particularly in the first two movements where expressive contrasts are consistently underplayed. Given the overall timing shown above, you may be surprised to discover that Kubelik does in fact make the first movement repeat. Only Neeme Järvi races through the music marked Allegro energico via non troppo (but never mind the qualifier) - at quite such a lick. And although Bernstein runs them close, his famously neurotic march has a rhythmic certainty and an alertness to detail and nuance that elude Kubelik in his headlong dash across country. The generalised élan of the finale is rather undermined by the fluffs and false entries, while its coda serves as an unlikely showcase for brass timbre of a more distinctive and regional variety than is beard from this source today. All in all, a bit of a gabble but a gift for confirmed Kubelik fanciers.
Do you remember the 1960s? A time before Mahler symphony series were two-a-penny, when conductors like Abravanel, Bernstein, Haitink and Solti vied to

www.buch.de
www.buch.de | 08.07.2002 | Olaf Behrens | July 8, 2002

Bisher sind nur Live-Einspielungen der Werke Mahlers unter Rafael KubelikMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Bisher sind nur Live-Einspielungen der Werke Mahlers unter Rafael Kubelik

Le Monde de la Musique
Le Monde de la Musique | Juillet - Août 2002 | Patrick Szersnovicz | July 1, 2002

L’immense Troisième Symphonie (1895-1896), vision panthéiste embrassant toute la nature, depuis les fleurs, les animaux jusqu’aux êtresMehr lesen

L’immense Troisième Symphonie (1895-1896), vision panthéiste embrassant toute la nature, depuis les fleurs, les animaux jusqu’aux êtres humains, demeure l’un des chefs-d’œuvre les plus accessibles de Gustav Mahler, et peut-être la meilleure introduction à son art. Mais elle impose à ses interprètes une exigence particulière. Le chef ne peut se contenter de donner corps à la grande forme par le biais de la petite, et doit laisser embrasser d’un regard l’extravagance des dimensions, dont la logique dynamique et architecturale réside dans un idéal épique proche de la narration romanesque. C’est pour cela qu’un abîme sépare les grandes références (Horenstein/Symphonique de Londres – le must –, Adler, Haitink I/Concertgebouw, Bernstein I et II, Haitink II/Berlin, Barbirolli, Neumann) d’enregistrements parfois brillants mais qui ne sont que juxtapositions de blocs sonores plus ou moins ciselés.

Comme dans de remarquable Cinquième, Sixième et Neuvième Symphonies et de splendides Première (« Choc »), Deuxième (idem) et Septième précédemment parues, Rafael Kubelik dans ce cycle de concerts inédits Mahler/Radio bavaroise se montre plus libre, plus fascinant que dans sa version de studio « officielle », un rien trop rapide et burinée, réalisée pourtant à la même époque (DG, 1966). Les tempos sont assez vifs, comparativement aux enregistrements de référence signés par Horenstein, Bernstein, Haitink, et Kubelik privilégie l’absence de pathos, le dépouillement, l’économie des contrastes, des gradations dynamiques et la mise en valeur da la complexité polyphonique. L’immense premier mouvement, d’une exaltation progressive, bénéficie de couleurs fauves et d’une articulation subtile. Les mouvements médians offrent un climat davantage mystérieux et rêveur, mais le finale, évitant lui aussi toute lourdeur, séduit plus par la tension que par sa ferveur.
L’immense Troisième Symphonie (1895-1896), vision panthéiste embrassant toute la nature, depuis les fleurs, les animaux jusqu’aux êtres

Berlingske Tidende
Berlingske Tidende | 21.06.2000 | Steen Chr. Steensen | June 21, 2002 I Kubeliks forunderlige verden
To enestàende optageIser af dirigenten Rafael Kubelik med Mahlers 1. og 5. Symfoni. Klassiske plader

Arene med det bayerske radiosymfoniorkester horer til de gyldne for denMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Arene med det bayerske radiosymfoniorkester horer til de gyldne for den

Répertoire
Répertoire | Juin 2002 - N° 158 | Jean-Marie Brohm | June 1, 2002

Après les Symphonies Nos 1, 2, 5, 7 et 9, Audite poursuit la publicationMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Après les Symphonies Nos 1, 2, 5, 7 et 9, Audite poursuit la publication

Hi Fi Review
Hi Fi Review | Vol. 192, May/June 2002 | May 1, 2002

chinesische Rezension siehe PDFMehr lesen

chinesische Rezension siehe PDF
chinesische Rezension siehe PDF

Hi Fi Review
Hi Fi Review | Vol. 192, May/June 2002 | May 1, 2002

chinesische Rezension siehe PDFMehr lesen

chinesische Rezension siehe PDF
chinesische Rezension siehe PDF

Hi Fi Review
Hi Fi Review | Vol. 192, May/June 2002 | May 1, 2002

chinesische Rezension siehe PDFMehr lesen

chinesische Rezension siehe PDF
chinesische Rezension siehe PDF

Neue Musikzeitung
Neue Musikzeitung | 5/2002 | Reinhard Schulz | May 1, 2002

Dass man Kubeliks Mahler-Zyklus auf CD neu veröffentlicht, kann man nurMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Dass man Kubeliks Mahler-Zyklus auf CD neu veröffentlicht, kann man nur

Fanfare | May/June 2002 | Christopher Abbot | May 1, 2002

According to the booklet that accompanies this release, Audite has released an almost-complete cycle of the Mahler Symphonies conducted by MaestroMehr lesen

According to the booklet that accompanies this release, Audite has released an almost-complete cycle of the Mahler Symphonies conducted by Maestro Kubelik (only the Fourth and Eighth are missing). They are all live recordings, made between 1967 and 1982. The orchestra is the Bavarian Radio Symphony, with whom Kubelik was closely associated and with whom he made a memorable Mahler cycle for DG between 1967 and 1971.

In fact, the performance on this disc would appear to be a concert performance that directly preceded the recording made for DG. It was Kubelik's practice to perform the Symphonies in concert and then to go into the studio (in this case, the same venue as the concert: Munich's Herkulessaal) and record the work for release on disc.

It should come as no surprise, then, that the two performances are nearly identical. The DG version has gained a few seconds per movement, but the differences are negligible. Most noticeable is the slightly more expansive development of the first movement, especially in the ethereal "mountain air" music. Orchestral definition is somewhat clearer on DG too, while there is the occasional lapse in ensemble and intonation on Audite that one forgives in a live performance.

As for the performance, it features many of the attractive characteristics of Kubelik's Mahler. His was a dynamic but somewhat understated approach, mostly free of Bernstein hyperbole and less purely driven than Solti. He shared with Haitink both emotional neutrality and the ability to bring clarity to Mahler's contradictory nature. His Sixth begins in an almost frantic manner with an unnecessary accelerando, but it is certainly energetic; the aforementioned development is atmospheric and is a perfect contrast to the relentlessness of the march. The second movement is possessed of much the same energy, but is leavened with whimsy. Not surprisingly, the Andante is starkly beautiful without being schmaltzy.

The finale strikes a balance between the expressionistic episodes, the mountain reminiscences, and the almost manic attempts to forestall the inevitable. The hammer blows (there are two) are not sharp or dry sounding, but the cowbells and celesta are perfect. The final chord is shattering and well judged.

This release would appear to be superfluous were it not for the fact that Kubelik’s DG recording is available only as part of his complete set, albeit at bargain price. This performance may be no match for the precision of Boulez or the emotional commitment of Tennstedt, and it lacks the overall mastery of Zander. But it is historically important, since it documents the work of a gifted second-generation Mahlerian.
According to the booklet that accompanies this release, Audite has released an almost-complete cycle of the Mahler Symphonies conducted by Maestro

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 4/2002 | Christian Wildhagen | April 1, 2002 Sogkraft

Von Rafael Kubelíks Studio-Zyklus aller Mahler-Sinfonien hieß es oft, er betone die böhmische Seite der Musik – ein allzu billigesMehr lesen

Von Rafael Kubelíks Studio-Zyklus aller Mahler-Sinfonien hieß es oft, er betone die böhmische Seite der Musik – ein allzu billiges Rezeptionsklischee. Kubelík betrachtet Mahler weder ausschließlich durch die Dvorák-Brille, noch verharmlost er ihn folkloristisch. Wie eigenständig seine Mahler-Sicht war, zeigen die bei Audite erscheinenden Mitschnitte aus den 1960er und 1970er Jahren, die als erstaunlich frisch klingende Seitenstücke zum technisch betagten Studio-Zyklus gelten können.

Offenkundig handelt es sich bei den Sinfonien Nr. 3 und Nr. 6 um Aufzeichnungen der Konzerte, die den DG-Aufnahmen vorangingen. Man erlebt alle Höhen und Tiefen von Live-Produktionen: kleinere Patzer und eine im Eifer des Gefechts mitunter nivellierte Dynamik, dafür aber mitreißende Spannungsbögen und eine Natürlichkeit der vorwärts drängenden Agogik, die ihresgleichen sucht. So gehört die „Feurig“ überschriebene Passage im Finale der Sechsten (ab 12’58’’) zu den atemberaubendsten Beispielen eines virtuos-enthemmten Orchesterspiels. Eine fast fatalistische Sogkraft scheint die Musik in ihren Strudel zu ziehen, auch im Andante gönnt Kubelík dem Hörer keine Oase der Entrückung.

Ausgeglichener und überragend in seiner großräumigen Disposition wirkt der Mitschnitt der Dritten, der in jedem Moment von der Persönlichkeit des Dirigenten durchdrungen scheint. Kaum ein Detail bleibt da unausgeleuchtet, und allenfalls das zu grobschlächtige Blech trübt bisweilen das Hochgefühl dieser beeindruckenden Aufführung.
Von Rafael Kubelíks Studio-Zyklus aller Mahler-Sinfonien hieß es oft, er betone die böhmische Seite der Musik – ein allzu billiges

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 4/2002 | Christian Wildhagen | April 1, 2002 Sogkraft

Von Rafael Kubelíks Studio-Zyklus aller Mahler-Sinfonien hieß es oft, er betone die böhmische Seite der Musik – ein allzu billigesMehr lesen

Von Rafael Kubelíks Studio-Zyklus aller Mahler-Sinfonien hieß es oft, er betone die böhmische Seite der Musik – ein allzu billiges Rezeptionsklischee. Kubelík betrachtet Mahler weder ausschließlich durch die Dvorák-Brille, noch verharmlost er ihn folkloristisch. Wie eigenständig seine Mahler-Sicht war, zeigen die bei Audite erscheinenden Mitschnitte aus den 1960er und 1970er Jahren, die als erstaunlich frisch klingende Seitenstücke zum technisch betagten Studio-Zyklus gelten können.

Offenkundig handelt es sich bei den Sinfonien Nr. 3 und Nr. 6 um Aufzeichnungen der Konzerte, die den DG-Aufnahmen vorangingen. Man erlebt alle Höhen und Tiefen von Live-Produktionen: kleinere Patzer und eine im Eifer des Gefechts mitunter nivellierte Dynamik, dafür aber mitreißende Spannungsbögen und eine Natürlichkeit der vorwärts drängenden Agogik, die ihresgleichen sucht. So gehört die „Feurig“ überschriebene Passage im Finale der Sechsten (ab 12’58’’) zu den atemberaubendsten Beispielen eines virtuos-enthemmten Orchesterspiels. Eine fast fatalistische Sogkraft scheint die Musik in ihren Strudel zu ziehen, auch im Andante gönnt Kubelík dem Hörer keine Oase der Entrückung.

Ausgeglichener und überragend in seiner großräumigen Disposition wirkt der Mitschnitt der Dritten, der in jedem Moment von der Persönlichkeit des Dirigenten durchdrungen scheint. Kaum ein Detail bleibt da unausgeleuchtet, und allenfalls das zu grobschlächtige Blech trübt bisweilen das Hochgefühl dieser beeindruckenden Aufführung.
Von Rafael Kubelíks Studio-Zyklus aller Mahler-Sinfonien hieß es oft, er betone die böhmische Seite der Musik – ein allzu billiges

Das Orchester | 4/02 | Kathrin Feldmann | April 1, 2002

Zeit seines Lebens wurde Mahler seitens der Kritiker als größenwahnsinnigMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Zeit seines Lebens wurde Mahler seitens der Kritiker als größenwahnsinnig

klassik.com | 03.03.2002 | Bernd Hemmersbach | March 3, 2002

Da dirigiert natürlich ein grosser Mahler- Dirigent, das weiß man, dassMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Da dirigiert natürlich ein grosser Mahler- Dirigent, das weiß man, dass

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | 03/2002 | Rémy Franck | March 1, 2002 Überraschungen mit Kubelik

Es ist doch erstaunlich, wie anders Kubelik Mahler live dirigiert, anders als die anderen Dirigenten, anders als er selbst in der Studioaufnahme. AuchMehr lesen

Es ist doch erstaunlich, wie anders Kubelik Mahler live dirigiert, anders als die anderen Dirigenten, anders als er selbst in der Studioaufnahme. Auch in dieser Dritten Symphonie überrascht er uns anderthalb Stunden lang. Gleich im ersten Satz ist alles weniger entschieden, weniger streng, als wir es gewöhnt sind. Kubelik spürt dem Detail nach, mit immenser Spannung, sehr tonmalerisch, sehr menschlich, sehr lyrisch, ja sogar sehr sentimental, sehr emphatisch, ohne Härte. Das Szenario der Abgründigkeit wird ironisch umspielt, als wolle Kubelik die Unwirklichkeit des Einen wie des Anderen unterstreichen. Und gerade aus dieser Dialektik ergibt sich die Unheimlichkeit der Musik, die uns ratlos zurücklässt. Was wollte Mahler denn nun sagen? Die transparenteste Musik wirkt hier so wenig transparent in ihrer Aussage. Gerade weil Kubelik auf fast naive Art und Weise so explizit im Detail ist, wird das Ganze zum Problem der Widersprüchlichkeit. Die ganze erste Abteilung ist eine Frage, auf welche die zweite Abteilung Antworten bringt, jedoch so verschiedene, dass sie uns als Katalog hingelegt werden, aus dem wir dann auswählen können, je nach Charakter, sicher auch je nach Stimmung. Und für Stimmungen sorgt Kubelik in grandioser Manier.

Darum: Eine essentielle Mahler-Deutung, die sich jedem, der sich ernsthaft mit Mahler auseinandersetzen will, geradezu aufdrängt.
Es ist doch erstaunlich, wie anders Kubelik Mahler live dirigiert, anders als die anderen Dirigenten, anders als er selbst in der Studioaufnahme. Auch

The Independent
The Independent | February 22, 2002 | Rob Cowan | February 22, 2002

Mahler's massive Sixth Symphony runs the gamut of emotion from courageousMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mahler's massive Sixth Symphony runs the gamut of emotion from courageous

Die Presse
Die Presse | Nr. 16.198 | Wilhelm Sinkovicz | February 15, 2002

Die Edition der Live-Mitschnitte der Münchner Mahler-Konzerte RafaelMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Edition der Live-Mitschnitte der Münchner Mahler-Konzerte Rafael

Video Pratique
Video Pratique | Fevrier-Mars 2002 | February 1, 2002

Une symphonie marquée par le désespoir absolu, d'une noirceur totale,Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Une symphonie marquée par le désespoir absolu, d'une noirceur totale,

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | 01.01.2002 | David Hurwitz | January 1, 2002

Rafael Kubelik's excellence in Mahler can almost be taken for granted. InMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik's excellence in Mahler can almost be taken for granted. In

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | 01.01.1000 | David Hurwitz | January 1, 2002

Rafael Kubelik never made a studio recording of Das Lied von der Erde, butMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik never made a studio recording of Das Lied von der Erde, but

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | 01.01.2002 | David Hurwitz | January 1, 2002

After slogging through Claudio Abbado's dismal, wretchedly recorded (live)Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
After slogging through Claudio Abbado's dismal, wretchedly recorded (live)

Rondo
Rondo | 13.12.2001 | Oliver Buslau | December 13, 2001

Als die Zuhörer am Nikolaustag des Jahres 1968 im Münchner HerkulessaalMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Als die Zuhörer am Nikolaustag des Jahres 1968 im Münchner Herkulessaal

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | December 2001 | David Nice | December 1, 2001

There were improvements to be made on Abbado’s 1980 Vienna recording of Mahler 3, especially given dim timpani strokes and sour chording in theMehr lesen

There were improvements to be made on Abbado’s 1980 Vienna recording of Mahler 3, especially given dim timpani strokes and sour chording in the final bars, and this live 1999 performance with the Berlin Philharmonic in London’s Royal Festival Hall gains in terms of refinement. Surprisingly, perhaps, the lyrical high-spots move faster than before, rather than slower, relating more tellingly either to their folksong roots (the posthorn serenade) or to the world of searing music drama, whether supporting the deeply expressive phrasing of alto Anna Larsson or bringing the Parsifal touch to the finale. Abbado’s miraculous flexibility has been honed to a fine art, as the flower-piece now tells us, and the inner-movement textures are as supernaturally and beautifully ‘live’ as Rattle makes them on EMI. The explosive ‘panics’ of the Symphony, though – and I use the term in the original, godlike sense Mahler intended – are never as threatening as either Rattle or Kubelík, in another live performance captured just before his 1968 studio recording, make them. Kubelík’s reading dates from a time when every orchestral nerve was straining to register the shock of the new, and if this occasionally means sour intonation and brass solos much less rounded than those of Abbado’s aristocratic Berliners, it does come closer to the anarchic voices of nature which resonate throughout the Symphony. This and other later instalments in Audite’s Kubelík Mahler cycle are much nearer in time to his DG studio recordings than revelatory early instalments, but his intensely mobile, very Bohemian point of view is worth hearing in either format.
There were improvements to be made on Abbado’s 1980 Vienna recording of Mahler 3, especially given dim timpani strokes and sour chording in the

International Record Review
International Record Review | 12/2001 | Graham Simpson | December 1, 2001

Still the enigma among Mahler symphonies, or is it that commentators still miss the point, or that the work as a whole is simply not good music? ThisMehr lesen

Still the enigma among Mahler symphonies, or is it that commentators still miss the point, or that the work as a whole is simply not good music? This live account, from a dedcated Mahlerian, does not readily provide answers, but makes speculation the more worthwhile.

A central factor in interpreting the Seventh Symphony is its form, each movement a sonata-rondo derivative that proceeds in circular rather than linear fashion. The outcome: a symphony which repeatedly turns back on itself, tying up loose ends across rather than between movements. Kubelík understands this so that, for instance, the initial Langsam, purposeful rather than indolent, is integral to what follows it. Similarly, the expressive central episode (8'43") is no mere interlude, but a necessary stage in the E/E minor tonal struggle around which the movement pivots. Kubelík catches the emotional ambivalence, if not always the fine irony, of the first Nachtmusik's march fantasy, while the Scherzo not only looks forward (as note writer Erich Mauermann points out) to La valse but also recalls the balletic dislocation of 'Un bal' from Symphonie fantastique. The second Nachtmusik is neither bland nor sentimentalized, just kept moving at a strolling gait, its course barely impeded by moments of chromatic emphasis. The underlying élan of the 'difficult' finale is varied according to each episode, with the reintroduction of earlier material (12'26") felt not as a grafted-on means of unity, but a thematic intensification before the affirmative reprise of the opening music: 'victory' in the completion of the journey rather than in the arrival.

Drawbacks? The extremely high-level radio broadcast, coupled with the frequent sense that Kubelík has rehearsed his players only to the brink of security, gives climactic passages a certain desperate quality — much of the detail is left to fend for itself. The six-note col legno phrase in the second movement is never played the same way twice, while the balance in the fourth movement does the guitar few favours. Yet there is a sense that this is the personal reading Kubelík was unable to achieve in the studio, before he either changed tack or lost the interpretative plot in his bizarrely laboured New York account. In their different ways, Bernstein, Haitink and Rattle are each more 'realized' as interpretations, but overt spontaneity may count for more in this Mahler symphony than any other.
Still the enigma among Mahler symphonies, or is it that commentators still miss the point, or that the work as a whole is simply not good music? This

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | December 2001 | David Nice | December 1, 2001

Collectors who like to keep a chamber of horrors in their CD library must not be without Scherchen’s live Mahler Five. Did the Philadelphians knowMehr lesen

Collectors who like to keep a chamber of horrors in their CD library must not be without Scherchen’s live Mahler Five. Did the Philadelphians know what they were in for when they finally lured the 73-year-old conductor over to America to give the work its first performance in its illustrious concert series? They got not only Scherchen’s extremes of fast and slow, but a scherzo where the second waltz strain becomes a lethargic trio, the opening is repeated and the rest disappears until the coda, and a finale with a further 200-odd bars missing (for which the hagiographic booklet note fails to prepare us). Scherchen is invariably master of the mess he makes, but the opening trumpet solo is a disaster and the strings can barely be heard in the dismal Philadelphia acoustics. What a relief, then, to turn to Kubelík conducting the Sixth in Munich four years later. This is a performance of consistent headlong intensity, an inch or two more hair-raising than Kubelík’s DG studio recording made the same month, and only relaxing at the still centre of the Andante: not perhaps for those who want to be clubbed over the head by Mahler’s marches or scared out of their wits, but decidedly the work of a flexible genius among conductors.
Collectors who like to keep a chamber of horrors in their CD library must not be without Scherchen’s live Mahler Five. Did the Philadelphians know

International Record Review
International Record Review | 12/2001 | Graham Simpson | December 1, 2001

Still the enigma among Mahler symphonies, or is it that commentators still miss the point, or that the work as a whole is simply not good music? ThisMehr lesen

Still the enigma among Mahler symphonies, or is it that commentators still miss the point, or that the work as a whole is simply not good music? This live account, from a dedcated Mahlerian, does not readily provide answers, but makes speculation the more worthwhile.

A central factor in interpreting the Seventh Symphony is its form, each movement a sonata-rondo derivative that proceeds in circular rather than linear fashion. The outcome: a symphony which repeatedly turns back on itself, tying up loose ends across rather than between movements. Kubelík understands this so that, for instance, the initial Langsam, purposeful rather than indolent, is integral to what follows it. Similarly, the expressive central episode (8'43") is no mere interlude, but a necessary stage in the E/E minor tonal struggle around which the movement pivots. Kubelík catches the emotional ambivalence, if not always the fine irony, of the first Nachtmusik's march fantasy, while the Scherzo not only looks forward (as note writer Erich Mauermann points out) to La valse but also recalls the balletic dislocation of 'Un bal' from Symphonie fantastique. The second Nachtmusik is neither bland nor sentimentalized, just kept moving at a strolling gait, its course barely impeded by moments of chromatic emphasis. The underlying élan of the 'difficult' finale is varied according to each episode, with the reintroduction of earlier material (12'26") felt not as a grafted-on means of unity, but a thematic intensification before the affirmative reprise of the opening music: 'victory' in the completion of the journey rather than in the arrival.

Drawbacks? The extremely high-level radio broadcast, coupled with the frequent sense that Kubelík has rehearsed his players only to the brink of security, gives climactic passages a certain desperate quality — much of the detail is left to fend for itself. The six-note col legno phrase in the second movement is never played the same way twice, while the balance in the fourth movement does the guitar few favours. Yet there is a sense that this is the personal reading Kubelík was unable to achieve in the studio, before he either changed tack or lost the interpretative plot in his bizarrely laboured New York account. In their different ways, Bernstein, Haitink and Rattle are each more 'realized' as interpretations, but overt spontaneity may count for more in this Mahler symphony than any other.
Still the enigma among Mahler symphonies, or is it that commentators still miss the point, or that the work as a whole is simply not good music? This

klassik.com | 29.11.2001 | Beate Hennenberg | November 29, 2001

Das Label Audite setzt mit vorliegender Aufnahme die erfolgreiche Reihe derMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Label Audite setzt mit vorliegender Aufnahme die erfolgreiche Reihe der

SWR
SWR | 7. November 2001 | Norbert Meurs | November 7, 2001

(Hörprobe: CD 2, Track 2 – 2’30, bei 1’30 mit Text drüber)<br /> <br /> EinMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
(Hörprobe: CD 2, Track 2 – 2’30, bei 1’30 mit Text drüber)

Ein

American Record Guide | 6/2001 | Gerald S. Fox | November 1, 2001

As with the Kubelik recording of Mahler's Symphony 2 (July/Aug 2001), this 1976 concert performance of Symphony 7 is not to be confused with his 1970Mehr lesen

As with the Kubelik recording of Mahler's Symphony 2 (July/Aug 2001), this 1976 concert performance of Symphony 7 is not to be confused with his 1970 studio recording with the same orchestra. I do not have that earlier recording on hand, but if memory serves, both have the same shortcomings. Although this is a well-conceived, straightforward performance, Kubelik ignores so many of Mahler's detailed notations--details that must be observed if Mahler's rampant imaginative ideas are to be realized--that the performance becomes a mere playing of the notes. For instance, the soaring, ecstatic flight of the strings in I (11:05-12:25) is neither soaring nor ecstatic. In the coda, the wild, screaming piccolos and the heavily scored battery--snare drum, cymbals, glockenspiel, tambourine, timpani, triangle--are scarcely heard (compare with the Horenstein, where they are heard best), and much orchestral color is thereby lost. In II, Mahler surely had more mystery in mind in this 'Night Music' than Kubelik gives us. The "Shadowy" (Mahler's word) III is very unshadowy under Kubelik's baton. (To experience that, try Bernstein or Thomas). The phantasmagoria is almost completely missing. Even the famous fffff(!) pizzicato (four bars after cue 161; "so intensely incited, that the strings strike the wood") sounds like a mere pluck (try the Sony Bernstein!). IV is quite good; Mahler's imaginative combining of guitar and mandolin in this movement is clearly heard (not so in many recordings). The finale brings us back to blandness. True, it is very spirited, but the movement's wild humor is in short supply. In the coda, Mahler throws every thing in but the kitchen sink, but here we do not hear much of it. In short, the movement's delicious vulgarity is lacking.

Despite the fact that many of the instruments (especially percussion) are scarcely heard, the recording has good sound. There are those who prefer their Mahler underplayed, with emotions held in check. I can recommend this recording to them, but as I have said often in these pages, underplayed, unemotional Mahler is an oxymoron.
As with the Kubelik recording of Mahler's Symphony 2 (July/Aug 2001), this 1976 concert performance of Symphony 7 is not to be confused with his 1970

Répertoire
Répertoire | No 151 | Pascal Brissaud | November 1, 2001

La même cas de figure se reproduit à l’encontre de Kubelik, dont auMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
La même cas de figure se reproduit à l’encontre de Kubelik, dont au

Monde de la Musique
Monde de la Musique | novembre 2001 | Patrick Szersnovicz | November 1, 2001

Volet central de la grande trilogie instrumentale mahlérienne, la Sixième Symphonie (1903-1904) diffère fort de ses jeux voisines: la plus grandeMehr lesen

Volet central de la grande trilogie instrumentale mahlérienne, la Sixième Symphonie (1903-1904) diffère fort de ses jeux voisines: la plus grande symphonie tragique de tous les temps est aussi la plus strictement classique de form de tout les symphonies de Mahler. Par le fait même de sublimer la forme sonate et la dialectique thématique allant de pair, la Sixième proclame en quelque sorte leur fin, ou du moins l'impossibilité momentanée d'y revenir. Alternance
rapide d'ombres et de lumières débouchant en catastrophe sur le néant, son gigantesque finale évite la grandiloquence malgré son volume sonore, et l'anecdotique malgré sa durée. Le rythme général des formes s'y apparente à un traitement abrupt des tonalités qui permet une meilleure différenciation plastique des plans harmoniques entre eux. Dans de nombreux passages éclate brusquement un ton de suvageric panique. Mahler n'oubliera jamais dans ses oeuvres ultérieures ce qu'il a accompli dans sa Sixième Symphonie: une lumière particulière braquée sur les contours, l'usage de bizarres, de combinaisons paradoxales de forte et de piano, et surtout une tendance du contrepoint à produire d'inattendues dissonances s'alliant à la polarité majeur-mineur (les contrepoints adoptant le mode opposé à celui des harmonies qui les accompagnent).

En complet accord avec la psychologie dramatique de Mahler, Rafael Kubelik dans cet enregistrement « live » du 6 décembre 1968 à la tête d'un Orchestre de la Radio bavaroise chauffé à blanc évite la grandiloquence, malgré une rare intensité et l'irruption d'outrances dont la grandeur dépasse toute négativité. Comme dans de remarquables Cinquième, Septième et Neuvième Symphonies et de splendides Première (« Choc ») et Deuxième (idem) précédemment parues, Kubelik dans ce cycle de concerts inédits Mahler/Radio bavaroise se montre plus libre, plus interrogatif, plus fascinant que dans sa version de studio « officielle », réalisée pourtant à la même époque (DG). Assez éloigné du romantisme déchirant de Bernstein/New York 1 (Sony, 1967), Neumann/Gewandhaus (Berlin Classics, 1966) et Karajan/Berlin (DG, 1977) comme de la clarté analytique de Szell/Claveland (Sony, « live » 1967) et Boulez/Vienne (DG, 1994) ou de la beauté des couleurs de Haitink/Berlin (Philipps, 1989), Kubelik, à partir d'une économie sel serrée des contrastes, et des gradations dynamiques, renforce le sentiment d'unité architecturale tout en magnifiant la « pureté de glace » (Schoenberg) de l'orchestre de la Sixième et en tirant un profit maximal des rares paliers de détente pour mieux assumer les soixante-treize minutes de tension émotionnelle. Tout en soulignant les nuances et les aspérités avec une rare urgence dramatique, il impose une vision à la force hymnique irradiante.
Volet central de la grande trilogie instrumentale mahlérienne, la Sixième Symphonie (1903-1904) diffère fort de ses jeux voisines: la plus grande

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | 11/01 | Rémy Franck | November 1, 2001 Zwei Mahler-Welten

Weiche Weiten zwischen zwei exzellenten Mahler-Interpretationen liegen können, zeigen diese zwei Einspielungen unter Kubelik und Gielen.<br /> <br /> In derMehr lesen

Weiche Weiten zwischen zwei exzellenten Mahler-Interpretationen liegen können, zeigen diese zwei Einspielungen unter Kubelik und Gielen.

In der live im Müncher Herkules-Saal gemachten Aufnahme peitscht Kubelik sein Orchester stringent und fanatisch durch die Symphonie, mit einem dramatischen und spannungsgeladenen 'Straight forward'-Musizieren, das streckenweise einen atemlos ekstatischen Charakter annimmt. Diese Unerbittlichkeit resultiert denn auch in schnellen 74 Minuten, welche die insgesamt sehr packend gespielte Symphonie bei Kubelik dauert, während der bedächtige Gielen ganze 10 Minuten mehr braucht. Ein enormer Unterschied!

Gielen macht natürlich weitaus mehr Musik hörbar als Kubelik und erzielt eine ebenfalls starke und ergreifende, ja sogar Frösteln auslösende Spannung aus der intellektuellen Durchdringung heraus und aus einem überaus nuancierten Spiel.

Das Schicksal schlägt bei Gielen ganz anders zu als bei Kubelik, hintergründiger, schauriger und mit ausladend großer Wucht. Und es reflektiert die Mahler-Musik nachfolgend in Bergs prächtig resalisierten 'Drei Orchesterstücken', die im Anschluss erklingen, vor dem Andante aus Schuberts 10. Symphonie, das Brian Newbould nach den 1978 gefundenen Skizzen Schuberts fertig stellte. Gielen dirigiert den Klagegesang sehr emotional, gefühlsintensiver jedenfalls als Mahlers Sechste und Bergs Orchesterstücke und setzt so einen ergreifenden Schlusspunkt hinter Musik, deren dämonischen Charakter er zwingend umsetzt.
Weiche Weiten zwischen zwei exzellenten Mahler-Interpretationen liegen können, zeigen diese zwei Einspielungen unter Kubelik und Gielen.

In der

Campus Mag
Campus Mag | No 61 | November 1, 2001

Ecrite en 1903, cette 6ème symphonie sur les 9 composées par Mahler estMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ecrite en 1903, cette 6ème symphonie sur les 9 composées par Mahler est

www.buch.de
www.buch.de | 15.10.2001 | Olaf Behrens | October 15, 2001

Für jeden Mahler - Liebhaber sind die Liveeinspielungen der Symphonien mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Für jeden Mahler - Liebhaber sind die Liveeinspielungen der Symphonien mit

klassik.com | 08.10.2001 | Beate Hennenberg | October 8, 2001

Verzweiflungseinbrüche und psychotische Aufwallungen, wie sie in derMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Verzweiflungseinbrüche und psychotische Aufwallungen, wie sie in der

Gramophone
Gramophone | Oct. 2001 | Richard Osborne | October 1, 2001

Rafael Kubelik's 1970 Deutsche Grammophon recording of Mahler's Seventh Symphony, made with this same orchestra in this same hall, was and remains asMehr lesen

Rafael Kubelik's 1970 Deutsche Grammophon recording of Mahler's Seventh Symphony, made with this same orchestra in this same hall, was and remains as analytically exact as any on record. Swift of foot, with crystal-clear textures, it places the symphony unequivocally in the 20th century. (Audite's notes tell us nothing about Kubelík's Mahler but it is an interesting fact that he studied the work with Erich Kleiber.)

Kubelik's approach suits the music wonderfully well: the opening movement's mighty oar-stroke, the spectral scherzo, the balmy beneath-the-stars caress of 'Nachtmusik II' (which like the Adagietto of the Fifth Symphony is all the more alluring at a quickish tempo), the finale's quasi-Ivesian revel. I would gather from Jonathan Swain's review of Kubelik's live 1980 New York performance that the reading had put on weight by then. That, or the New York Philharmonic lacked the time or inclination to dip their sound in the refiner's fire.

Happily, this 1976 Bavarian Radio performance is very much the reading as it was, with a comparably fine Herkulessaal recording. What it lacks, alas, is the absolute clarity and consistent impetus of the studio version. Recording these Mahlerian behemoths at a single sitting often ends up this way. In the finale, the playing lacks the freshness - the needle-sharp texturing and edge-of-the-seat excitement - of the studio version.

The studio recording is available only as part of Kubelik's complete 10-CD set of the symphonies (glorious performances of Nos 1, 3 and 7, and nothing that is less than fresh and interesting, all advantageously priced). Younger Mahlerians who can't run to that may care to get a sense of this unique reading of the Seventh from the new Audite CD. Sadly, it isn't cheap; indeed, given its provenance and packing, it's unreasonably dear.
Rafael Kubelik's 1970 Deutsche Grammophon recording of Mahler's Seventh Symphony, made with this same orchestra in this same hall, was and remains as

The Lion
The Lion | Septembre 2001, No 527 | Claude Lamarque | September 1, 2001

Il faut un réel courage et un remarquable directeur artistique pour qu'uneMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Il faut un réel courage et un remarquable directeur artistique pour qu'une

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | 09/2001 | Rémy Franck | September 1, 2001 Kubelik mit impulsivem Mahler

Erstes auffallendes Merkmal dieser Live-Aufnahme der erratischen 7. Symphonie Gustav Mahlers ist die Schnelligkeit, mit der Kubelik die EcksätzeMehr lesen

Erstes auffallendes Merkmal dieser Live-Aufnahme der erratischen 7. Symphonie Gustav Mahlers ist die Schnelligkeit, mit der Kubelik die Ecksätze nimmt. Der erste Satz bekommt so eine wirklich ungewohnte Frische. Die erste Nachtmusik wird bei Kubelik zur Tagesmusik oder zumindest zu einer Nachtmusik mit Tagesgedanken. Trotz seiner Brüche bleibt der Satz ungemein positiv und von fast rustikaler Bonhomie. Das Scherzo kommt dann um so fratzenhafter daher, als trunkene Musik mit fast dämonischem Einschlag. Das 'Andante Amoroso', die zweite der beiden Nachtmusiken dieser Syrnphonie, findet kaum zum wirklichen 'Amoroso', kaum zur Ruhe, sondern erschöpft sich in einem Kampf zwischen Ruhe und Nervosität und führt so zu einem fast hemdsärmelig legeren, spontanen und direkten Finalsatz.
Erstes auffallendes Merkmal dieser Live-Aufnahme der erratischen 7. Symphonie Gustav Mahlers ist die Schnelligkeit, mit der Kubelik die Ecksätze

Stereo
Stereo | 09/2001 | Egon Bezold | September 1, 2001

Rafael Kubelik galt als profunder Mahler-Interpret. Er war von 1961 bisMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik galt als profunder Mahler-Interpret. Er war von 1961 bis

Klassik heute
Klassik heute | 07/2001 | Benjamin G. Cohrs | July 1, 2001

Künstlerisch sind die bislang vorgelegten live-Mitschnitte von MahlersMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Künstlerisch sind die bislang vorgelegten live-Mitschnitte von Mahlers

www.andante.com
www.andante.com | 07/2001 | Jed Distler | July 1, 2001

Audite continues to mine the vaults for its ongoing Rafael Kubelik/BavarianMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Audite continues to mine the vaults for its ongoing Rafael Kubelik/Bavarian

American Record Guide | 4/2001 | Gerald Fox | July 1, 2001

This 1982 concert performance is not to be confused with Kubelik\'s 1969 studio recording with the same orchestra, chorus, and soprano.<br /> <br /> TheMehr lesen

This 1982 concert performance is not to be confused with Kubelik\'s 1969 studio recording with the same orchestra, chorus, and soprano.

The interpretations are quite similar. Both stick closely to the score, though in both versions, Kubelik ignores many of Mahler\'s detailed notations: caesuras in I, long-held horn notes in V, etc. The only significant changes in tempo are in I, III, and V. The 1982 I is about a minute longer than the 1969; the 1982 III is about 1:20 longer, and the 1982 V is about two minutes longer. The total for 1969 is 76:18, for 1982 80:00. Both are well played and rather straightforward and earnest rather than exciting.

Soprano Edith Mathis is excellent in the 1969, and a shade less so in the 1982. Both contraltos are excellent, with Norma Procter more angelic (1969) and Fassbaender more ardent. In 1969 Kubelik has the basses slow down somewhat and then accelerate in the fourth measure of I. He does not repeat that sin in 1982. The bells at the end of the symphony are reasonably audible in 1982, but next to inaudible in 1969. Sonics in both are good; the 1969 crisper and brighter, the 1982 warmer, with better low frequencies. There is a production slip in this one: Mahler wanted III, IV, and V played without pause. That is impossible here, because III is on one disc and IV and V on the other. The timings are such that III, IV, and V could have been accommodated on one disc.

If you have the 1969 recording, I do not think you need to acquire the 1982. If you like Kubelik\'s way with Mahler and do not have his Second, the 1969 seems to be deleted.
This 1982 concert performance is not to be confused with Kubelik\'s 1969 studio recording with the same orchestra, chorus, and soprano.

The

Musikmarkt
Musikmarkt | 6/2001 | June 1, 2001

Die Liveaufzeichnung entstand 1982 mit dem Symphonie-Orchester und dem ChorMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Liveaufzeichnung entstand 1982 mit dem Symphonie-Orchester und dem Chor

Opéra International
Opéra International | Juin 2001 - n° 258 | Thierry Guyenne | June 1, 2001

Au nombre des grands chefs mahlériens, à côté des Klemperer, Walter ouMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Au nombre des grands chefs mahlériens, à côté des Klemperer, Walter ou

Rondo
Rondo | 6/2001 | Oliver Buslau | June 1, 2001 Lorbeer + Zitronen
Was Rondo-Kritikern 2001 besonders gefallen und missfallen hat

Meine stille Liebe:<br /> die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Meine stille Liebe:
die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mit

Rondo
Rondo | 6/2001 | Oliver Buslau | June 1, 2001 Lorbeer + Zitronen
Was Rondo-Kritikern 2001 besonders gefallen und missfallen hat

Meine stille Liebe:<br /> die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Meine stille Liebe:
die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mit

Rondo
Rondo | 6/2001 | Oliver Buslau | June 1, 2001 Lorbeer + Zitronen
Was Rondo-Kritikern 2001 besonders gefallen und missfallen hat

Meine stille Liebe:<br /> die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Meine stille Liebe:
die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mit

Rondo
Rondo | 6/2001 | Oliver Buslau | June 1, 2001 Lorbeer + Zitronen
Was Rondo-Kritikern 2001 besonders gefallen und missfallen hat

Meine stille Liebe:<br /> die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Meine stille Liebe:
die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mit

Rondo
Rondo | 6/2001 | Oliver Buslau | June 1, 2001 Lorbeer + Zitronen
Was Rondo-Kritikern 2001 besonders gefallen und missfallen hat

Meine stille Liebe:<br /> die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Meine stille Liebe:
die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mit

Rondo
Rondo | 6/2001 | Oliver Buslau | June 1, 2001 Lorbeer + Zitronen
Was Rondo-Kritikern 2001 besonders gefallen und missfallen hat

Meine stille Liebe:<br /> die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Meine stille Liebe:
die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mit

Rondo
Rondo | 6/2001 | Oliver Buslau | June 1, 2001 Lorbeer + Zitronen
Was Rondo-Kritikern 2001 besonders gefallen und missfallen hat

Meine stille Liebe:<br /> die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Meine stille Liebe:
die Wiederveröffentlichungen der Mahler-Sinfonien mit

www.buch.de
www.buch.de | 11.05.2001 | Olaf Behrens | May 11, 2001

Die siebte Symphonie von Gustav Mahler erscheint bis heute rätselhaft.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die siebte Symphonie von Gustav Mahler erscheint bis heute rätselhaft.

Classica
Classica | Mai 2001 | Stéphane Friédérich | May 1, 2001

Il manque encore les Symphonies no 2, no 3, no 6 et no 8 pour que cetteMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Il manque encore les Symphonies no 2, no 3, no 6 et no 8 pour que cette

Monde de la Musique
Monde de la Musique | Mai 2001 | Patrick Szersnovicz | May 1, 2001

Avec les quartes empilées de son premier mouvement qui paraissent avoir directement inspiré la Première Symphonie de chambre de Schoenberg etMehr lesen

Avec les quartes empilées de son premier mouvement qui paraissent avoir directement inspiré la Première Symphonie de chambre de Schoenberg et l’incroyable audace de sa valse-cauchemar centrale, danse d’ombres d’ailleurs intitulée Schattenhaft (« emplie d’ombres »), la Septième Symphonie « Chant de la Nuit » (1904-1905) reste la plus mystérieuse, la plus complexe des symphonies de Mahler, et sans doute la plus moderne et la plus « avancée » . La controverse débute dès la tonalité à lui attribuer (mi mineur, si mineur ?), car l’introduction, indéterminée mais extrêmement riche au point de vues des tonalités, semble en contradiction avec tout ce qui sait. Les mouvements médians, qui sont tous trois, y compris le scherzo, des nocturnes descendent dans la région de la sous-dominante. Le bruyant finale, en ut majeur, rétablit apparemment l’équilibre. Mais, tout au long de l’oeuvre, l’harmonisation souvent libre et dissonante amène également la ligne mélodique à parcourir de grands intervalles dissonants. Aux modulations imperceptibles, Mahler dans la Septième Symphonie préfère les vastes et brusques changements de plan. L’harmonie ne lui sert pas à affiner le détail mais à doter le tout d’ombre et de lumière, d’effets de relief et de profondeur. Dans la Nachtmusik I et le finale, il cherche à restaurer quelque chose de ce caractère rayonnant que le simple accord parfait majeur avait depuis longtemps perdu.

Après de remarquable Cinquième et Neuvième Symphonies et de splendides Première ( « Choc » ) et Deuxième (idem), toutes quatre enregistrées « live », la firme Audite Schallplatten propose un nouvel inédit de ce cycle Mahler /Kubelik/Radio bavaroise. Plus subtil, plus libre, plus interrogatif et moins uniment fébrile que dans sa version de studio « officiel » de la Septième Symphonie avec la même orchestre (DG, 1970), Rafael Kubelik, dans cet enregistrement du 5 février 1976 réalisé à la Herkulessaal de la Résidence de Munich, concilie la gravité ( premier mouvement ), les élans visionnaires ( trois mouvements médians ) et un refus de toute redondance inutile ( finale ). Assez éloigné du romantisme déchirant de Bernstein I/New York (Sony, « Choc ») comme de la clarté analytique et de la beauté des couleurs de Haitink III/Berlin (Philips, idem), Kubelik allie l’intelligence au lyrisme. Il sait caractériser toutes les musiques, toute l’ambiguïté que l’oeuvre contient sans jamais perdre le fil du parcours, et il magnifie le détail en préservant la cohérence de la progression dramatique. Sans être partout impeccables, les instrumentistes de l’Orchestre de la Radio bavaroise répondent avec vivacité aux impulsions du chef, qui concilie les contraires avec clairvoyance.
Avec les quartes empilées de son premier mouvement qui paraissent avoir directement inspiré la Première Symphonie de chambre de Schoenberg et

Répertoire
Répertoire | Mai 2001 | Christophe Huss | May 1, 2001

La 7e Symphonie est l'un des points culminants de l'intégrale officielleMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
La 7e Symphonie est l'un des points culminants de l'intégrale officielle

Rondo
Rondo | 19.04.2001 | Thomas Schulz | April 19, 2001

Mahlers "verflixte Siebte", die so vielen Interpreten und Exegeten RätselMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mahlers "verflixte Siebte", die so vielen Interpreten und Exegeten Rätsel

Die Presse
Die Presse | Nr. 15.940 | Wilhelm Sinkovicz | April 7, 2001

Rafael Kubelik hat seinen Mahler-Zyklus mit dem Symphonieorchester desMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik hat seinen Mahler-Zyklus mit dem Symphonieorchester des

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | 4/2001 | Rémy Franck | April 1, 2001

Als Rafael Kubelik 1982 Mahlers zweite Symphonie dirigierte, war er 68 Jahre alt. Seit seiner Studioeinspielung des Werkes für die ‚DeutscheMehr lesen

Als Rafael Kubelik 1982 Mahlers zweite Symphonie dirigierte, war er 68 Jahre alt. Seit seiner Studioeinspielung des Werkes für die ‚Deutsche Grammophon’ waren über 12 Jahre vergangen. Und das hört man auf sehr interessante Weise. An Farben hat Kubeliks Mahler nichts verloren, wohl aber an Schärfe und Feuer. Die Intensität des Ausdrucks liegt in dieser Interpretation anderswo: der Atem wechselt zwischen Ruhe und Unruhe, zwischen Angst und Schrecken und vertrauensvollem Glauben. So zeugt Kubelik eine ergreifende Zweite voller überraschender Momente, besonders was die Dynamik anbelangt. In seinem Bemühen um eine derart differenzierende Spielweise wird der Dirigent vom Symphonieorchester des BR und den beiden herausragenden Solistinnen denkbar gut unterstützt.
Als Rafael Kubelik 1982 Mahlers zweite Symphonie dirigierte, war er 68 Jahre alt. Seit seiner Studioeinspielung des Werkes für die ‚Deutsche

Das Orchester | 04/2001 | Werner Bodendorff | April 1, 2001

Es gibt noch glückliche Umstände, bei denen sich wirklich allesMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Es gibt noch glückliche Umstände, bei denen sich wirklich alles

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 4/01 | Gregor Willmes | April 1, 2001 Mahler ohne Manierismen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein AndenkenMehr lesen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken besonders, indem sie kontinuierlich Rundfunkmitschnitte des bedeutenden Dirigenten erstmals auf Tonträger präsentiert. Gregor Willmes hat die bei audite erschienenen Mahler-Aufnahmen mit denen der legendären Gesamteinspielung für die Deutsche Grammophon verglichen.

Der Durchbruch Gustav Mahlers fand nicht im Konzertsaal statt. Zwar gab es nach seinem Tod einige Dirigenten, die wie Willem Mengelberg, Otto Klemperer und Bruno Walter Mahler noch kennen gelernt hatten und sich nachdrücklich auch im Konzertsaal für seine Sinfonien einsetzten. Doch verdankt Mahler mit Sicherheit seine Popularität zum großen Teil der Stereo-Schallplatte. Seine Sinfonien schienen wie geschaffen dazu, die Möglichkeiten der Studio-Technik darzustellen. So klingen die riesigen Sinfonien auf Tonträger oftmals sogar transparenter, als sie es im Konzertsaal je vermögen.

Leonard Bernstein war der erste, der Mitte der 60er Jahre mit dem New York Philharmonic für CBS (heute Sony) eine Gesamtaufnahme der Mahlerschen Sinfonien schuf, allerdings ohne das Adagio der unvollendeten Zehnten. Ihm folgte Rafael Kubelik, der mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zwischen 1967 und 1971 im Herkules-Saal der Münchener Residenz alle Neune und den Adagio-Satz der Zehnten aufzeichnen ließ. Nur kurze Zeit später erschienen noch Gesamtaufnahmen von Bernard Haitink (Philips) und Georg Solti (Decca).

Ingo Harden zog im Dezember 1971 im Fono Form folgendes Fazit bezüglich der Kubelik-Aufnahmen: "Alles in allem: Der zweite vollständige Mahler-Zyklus hat in der Reihe der Mahler-Interpretationen der Gegenwart sein durchaus eigenes Profil, da sich von Bernsteins Aufnahmen durch ein Weniger an Leidenschaft und Pathos, ein Mehr an orchestraler Detailarbeit, einen helleren Grundton und eine emotional mehr den Mittelkurs haltende Darstellung unterscheidet." Harden stellte das Bild von Kubeliks "böhmischen Musikantentum" infrage, ohne es ganz abzustreiten, lobte darüber hinaus besonders die "sehr subtil und genau alle Klangfarben der Partituren aufschlüsselnden Aufführungen". In beidem ist Harden wohl Recht zu geben, wobei man nach meinem Dafürhalten allerdings Kubeliks tschechischen Wurzeln auch nicht unterschätzen soll, obwohl er sich (worauf Francis Drésel in seinem Aufsatz "Rafael Kubelik - Musiker und Poet" überzeugend hingewiesen hat) wie Mahler nach und nach "germanisiert" hat.

Rafael Kubelik wurde am 29. Juni 1914 in Bychorie bei Prag als Sohn des berühmten Geigen-Virtuosen Jan Kubelik geboren. Er studierte am Konservatorium in Prag Geige, Klavier, Dirigieren und Komposition. Er zählte also zu jener Kategorie von Mahler-Dirigenten, die wie Furtwängler und Klemperer oder wie später Bernstein und Boulez auch als Komponisten hervorgetreten sind. Das lässt vielleicht einerseits besser verstehen, warum Kubelik die musikalischen Zusammen hänge in Mahlers komplexen Sinfonien so einleuchtend darstellen konnte. Andererseits sagt das Komponisten-Dasein allein wieder auch nicht so viel über den Interpretationsstil aus, wenn man etwa an die Unterschiede zwischen Bernsteins expressivem und Boulez' analytischem Zugriff auf Mahler denkt.

Rafael Kubelik lernte Mahlers Sinfonien bereits in seiner Jugend in Prag kennen, zumeist dirigiert von Vaclav Talich,
aber auch von Gastdirigenten wie Bruno Walter, Otto Klemperer und Erich Kleiber. Für Kleibers Aufführung von Mahlers siebter Sinfonie leitete der 24-jährige Kubelik 1938 sogar die ersten Proben mit der Tschechischen Philharmonie.

Schnell machte Kubelik Karriere: 1939 wurde er Musikdirektor der Oper in Brünn, 1942 Leiter der Tschechischen Philharmonie. Später übernahm er Chefpositionen beim Chicago Symphony Orchestra und an den Opernhäusern Covent Garden London und Metropolitan New York. Seine zweite Heimat - nach Prag - wurde allerdings München, wo er von 1961 bis 1971 als Chefdirigent und noch bis 1985 als regelmäßiger Gast das Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zu außergewöhnlichen Erfolgen führte.

Laut Erich Mauermann, dem damaligen Orchesterdirektor, war Kubelik der erste Dirigent der in München einen kompletten Mahler-Zyklus durchführte. Da er Mahlers Werke immer wieder auf den Spielplan setzte, sind einige Konzertmitschnitte erhalten, die jetzt nach und nach bei audite auf CD erscheinen. Friedrich Mauermann, Bruder von Erich Mauermann und mittlerweile in den Ruhestand getretener Ex-Chef von audite Schallplatten, hat die Reihe initiiert und dabei auf das Archiv des Bayerischen Rundfunks zurückgegriffen. Bei den Sinfonien eins, zwei und fünf hatte er sogar jeweils die Auswahl zwischen zwei verschiedenen Mitschnitten. "Wenn mehrere Aufnahmen derselben Sinfonie vorhanden waren", so Mauermann, "habe ich immer die jüngere genommen. Einerseits wegen des besseren Klangbildes, andererseits wegen der musikalischen Qualität. Die Gesamtzeiten der jüngeren Aufnahmen sind generell länger als die der älteren. Die Musik atmet mehr."

Die bisher veröffentlichten Mitschnitte der Sinfonien eins, zwei, fünf, sieben und neun stammen aus den Jahren 1975 und 1982 und wurden bis auf die neunte alle im Münchner Herkules Saal aufgenommen. Folgen sollen noch Mitschnitte der Sinfonien drei (1967) und sechs (1968), ebenfalls aus dem Herkules-Saal.

Somit stammen die bis jetzt vorliegenden Aufnahmen aus einer Zeit, die nach den Grammophon-Aufnahmen liegt. Und sucht man nach grundsätzlichen interpretatorischen Unterschieden, so stößt man zuerst auf die von Mauermann erwähnten langsameren Tempi der späteren Fassungen. Die "beiläufige" Schnelligkeit, die man den DG-Einspielungen bisweilen vorgeworfen hat, sind abgelegt. Vor allem in den Adagio- und Andante-Sätzen wählt Kubelik in späteren Jahren langsamere Tempi, beispielsweise im dritten Satz der ersten Sinfonie, aufgenommen am 2. November 1979. "Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen" lautet die Satzbezeichnung, die Kubelik genau beachtet. Wunderbar baut er die Spannung auf, spielt das Crescendo aus, das allein durch das ständige Hinzutreten neuer Instrumente erreicht wird. Das Oboensolo ist überaus deutlich phrasiert, bildet im betonten Staccato einen Kontrapunkt zum Legato der Streicher. Das Parodistische des Satzes ist wesentlich besser getroffen als in der DG-Einspielung. Auch das "Ziemlich langsam" (Ziffer 5) wirkt in sich schlüssiger, man meint auf einmal einen Spielmannszug oder eine Klezmer-Kapelle zu hören.

Herrlich sind auch die ersten beiden Sätze des audite-Mitschnitts gelungen: "Wie ein Naturlaut" - kaum ein Dirigent
dürfte Mahlers Vorstellungen beim Beginn des ersten Satzes wohl so gut getroffen haben wie Kubelik in diesem Konzert. Dass die Stelle hier wesentlich überzeugender wirkt als in der DG-Einspielung, liegt auch in der Aufnahmetechnik begründet. Bei der Grammophon klingen die Stimmen isolierter, in der späteren Rundfunk-Aufnahme verschmelzen sie stärker: Das mindert etwas den analytischen Ansatz, verstärkt jedoch die Unmittelbarkeit der Naturstimmung. Hinzu kommt, dass das Orchester, besonders die Bläser, in der späteren Aufnahme noch souveräner wirken als in der ersten. Dass es sich um einen Konzertmitschnitt handelt, geht nirgendwo auf Kosten der künstlerischen Qualität. Das spricht für eine intensive Probenarbeit.

Die wesentlich bessere Aufnahmetechnik ist übrigens ein Charakteristikum, das fast alle audite-Produktionen auszeichnet. Die Konzertmitschnitte besitzen mehr räumliche Tiefe. Während die DG-Aufnahmen sehr auf Transparenz bedacht sind und immer wieder einzelne Instrumente oder Gruppen nach vorn ziehen, meint man bei den Rundfunkmitschnitten, wirklich ein Orchester im Saal der Residenz zu erleben. Und die Live-Aufnahme der neunten Sinfonie aus Tokios Bunka Kaikan Concert Hall klingt im Vergleich deutlich flacher als die Münchner Aufnahmen.

Was Kubeliks Mahler-Aufnahmen auch noch denen bei audite - gelegentlich fehlt, das ist die mitreißende Kraft, mit der sich etwa Bernstein in die schnellen Sätze warf. Das Finale der ersten Sinfonie ("Stürmisch bewegt") beispielsweise oder der zweite Satz der ansonsten interpretatorisch überzeugenden fünften ("Stürmisch bewegt, mit größer Vehemenz") weisen in dieser Hinsicht Defizite auf.

Den stärksten Eindruck der audite-Mitschnitte hinterlassen nicht zufällig jene Sinfonien, die solche Satzcharaktere
weitesgehend aussparen: die zweite und die siebte Sinfonie. So war der 8. Oktober 1982 ein wirklicher Glückstag für die Geschichte der Mahler-Interpretation. Denn Kubelik dirigierte die zweite an diesem Tag wie aus einem Guss: Alles fließt, nichts wirkt forciert im Allegro maestoso. Ein ungemein feinsinniges, schwereloses Musizieren zeichnet das Andante aus. Herrlich setzt Kubelik das Scherzo um. Das böhmisch-mährische Musikantentum - dem Ingo Harden einst so zweifelnd gegenüberstand - ist hier prächtig zu finden. Die Fischpredigt hält Kubelik leider nicht ganz so ironisch wie Bernstein. Dafür hat er mit Brigitte Fassbaender einen Alt, der das "Röschen rot" mit hinreißendem Timbre und klarer, sinnhaltiger Artikulation versieht. Im hervorragend gesteigerten Finale bilden Edith Mathis und Brigitte Fassbaender ein Traumpaar.

Genauso überragend ist die gerade auf CD erschienene siebte Sinfonie gestaltet. Sehr organisch meisterte Kubelik am 5. Februar 1976 die ständigen Tempowechsel im ersten Satz. Zauberhaft, dunkel getönt kommen die Nachtmusiken auf CD daher. Das Scherzo nimmt von Anfang an gefangen und lässt den Hörer nicht mehr los. Selbst das apotheotische Finale, mit dem viele Dirigenten Probleme haben, klingt bei Kubelik sinnvoll. Das Pathos wirkt nicht übertrieben, aber die Zuversicht bleibt.

Fazit: Mit diesen Mahler-Veröffentlichungen ist audite ein großer Wurf gelungen. Und wer bei Kubelik auf den Geschmack gekommen ist, der kann bei demselben Label auch noch hervorragende Mitschnitte von Beethoven- und vor allem Mozart-Konzerten bekommen, die Clifford Curzon mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks unter Kubelik in der Residenz gegeben hat. Aber Clifford Curzon ist schon wieder ein Thema für sich.
Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 4/01 | Gregor Willmes | April 1, 2001 Mahler ohne Manierismen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein AndenkenMehr lesen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken besonders, indem sie kontinuierlich Rundfunkmitschnitte des bedeutenden Dirigenten erstmals auf Tonträger präsentiert. Gregor Willmes hat die bei audite erschienenen Mahler-Aufnahmen mit denen der legendären Gesamteinspielung für die Deutsche Grammophon verglichen.

Der Durchbruch Gustav Mahlers fand nicht im Konzertsaal statt. Zwar gab es nach seinem Tod einige Dirigenten, die wie Willem Mengelberg, Otto Klemperer und Bruno Walter Mahler noch kennen gelernt hatten und sich nachdrücklich auch im Konzertsaal für seine Sinfonien einsetzten. Doch verdankt Mahler mit Sicherheit seine Popularität zum großen Teil der Stereo-Schallplatte. Seine Sinfonien schienen wie geschaffen dazu, die Möglichkeiten der Studio-Technik darzustellen. So klingen die riesigen Sinfonien auf Tonträger oftmals sogar transparenter, als sie es im Konzertsaal je vermögen.

Leonard Bernstein war der erste, der Mitte der 60er Jahre mit dem New York Philharmonic für CBS (heute Sony) eine Gesamtaufnahme der Mahlerschen Sinfonien schuf, allerdings ohne das Adagio der unvollendeten Zehnten. Ihm folgte Rafael Kubelik, der mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zwischen 1967 und 1971 im Herkules-Saal der Münchener Residenz alle Neune und den Adagio-Satz der Zehnten aufzeichnen ließ. Nur kurze Zeit später erschienen noch Gesamtaufnahmen von Bernard Haitink (Philips) und Georg Solti (Decca).

Ingo Harden zog im Dezember 1971 im Fono Form folgendes Fazit bezüglich der Kubelik-Aufnahmen: "Alles in allem: Der zweite vollständige Mahler-Zyklus hat in der Reihe der Mahler-Interpretationen der Gegenwart sein durchaus eigenes Profil, da sich von Bernsteins Aufnahmen durch ein Weniger an Leidenschaft und Pathos, ein Mehr an orchestraler Detailarbeit, einen helleren Grundton und eine emotional mehr den Mittelkurs haltende Darstellung unterscheidet." Harden stellte das Bild von Kubeliks "böhmischen Musikantentum" infrage, ohne es ganz abzustreiten, lobte darüber hinaus besonders die "sehr subtil und genau alle Klangfarben der Partituren aufschlüsselnden Aufführungen". In beidem ist Harden wohl Recht zu geben, wobei man nach meinem Dafürhalten allerdings Kubeliks tschechischen Wurzeln auch nicht unterschätzen soll, obwohl er sich (worauf Francis Drésel in seinem Aufsatz "Rafael Kubelik - Musiker und Poet" überzeugend hingewiesen hat) wie Mahler nach und nach "germanisiert" hat.

Rafael Kubelik wurde am 29. Juni 1914 in Bychorie bei Prag als Sohn des berühmten Geigen-Virtuosen Jan Kubelik geboren. Er studierte am Konservatorium in Prag Geige, Klavier, Dirigieren und Komposition. Er zählte also zu jener Kategorie von Mahler-Dirigenten, die wie Furtwängler und Klemperer oder wie später Bernstein und Boulez auch als Komponisten hervorgetreten sind. Das lässt vielleicht einerseits besser verstehen, warum Kubelik die musikalischen Zusammen hänge in Mahlers komplexen Sinfonien so einleuchtend darstellen konnte. Andererseits sagt das Komponisten-Dasein allein wieder auch nicht so viel über den Interpretationsstil aus, wenn man etwa an die Unterschiede zwischen Bernsteins expressivem und Boulez' analytischem Zugriff auf Mahler denkt.

Rafael Kubelik lernte Mahlers Sinfonien bereits in seiner Jugend in Prag kennen, zumeist dirigiert von Vaclav Talich,
aber auch von Gastdirigenten wie Bruno Walter, Otto Klemperer und Erich Kleiber. Für Kleibers Aufführung von Mahlers siebter Sinfonie leitete der 24-jährige Kubelik 1938 sogar die ersten Proben mit der Tschechischen Philharmonie.

Schnell machte Kubelik Karriere: 1939 wurde er Musikdirektor der Oper in Brünn, 1942 Leiter der Tschechischen Philharmonie. Später übernahm er Chefpositionen beim Chicago Symphony Orchestra und an den Opernhäusern Covent Garden London und Metropolitan New York. Seine zweite Heimat - nach Prag - wurde allerdings München, wo er von 1961 bis 1971 als Chefdirigent und noch bis 1985 als regelmäßiger Gast das Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zu außergewöhnlichen Erfolgen führte.

Laut Erich Mauermann, dem damaligen Orchesterdirektor, war Kubelik der erste Dirigent der in München einen kompletten Mahler-Zyklus durchführte. Da er Mahlers Werke immer wieder auf den Spielplan setzte, sind einige Konzertmitschnitte erhalten, die jetzt nach und nach bei audite auf CD erscheinen. Friedrich Mauermann, Bruder von Erich Mauermann und mittlerweile in den Ruhestand getretener Ex-Chef von audite Schallplatten, hat die Reihe initiiert und dabei auf das Archiv des Bayerischen Rundfunks zurückgegriffen. Bei den Sinfonien eins, zwei und fünf hatte er sogar jeweils die Auswahl zwischen zwei verschiedenen Mitschnitten. "Wenn mehrere Aufnahmen derselben Sinfonie vorhanden waren", so Mauermann, "habe ich immer die jüngere genommen. Einerseits wegen des besseren Klangbildes, andererseits wegen der musikalischen Qualität. Die Gesamtzeiten der jüngeren Aufnahmen sind generell länger als die der älteren. Die Musik atmet mehr."

Die bisher veröffentlichten Mitschnitte der Sinfonien eins, zwei, fünf, sieben und neun stammen aus den Jahren 1975 und 1982 und wurden bis auf die neunte alle im Münchner Herkules Saal aufgenommen. Folgen sollen noch Mitschnitte der Sinfonien drei (1967) und sechs (1968), ebenfalls aus dem Herkules-Saal.

Somit stammen die bis jetzt vorliegenden Aufnahmen aus einer Zeit, die nach den Grammophon-Aufnahmen liegt. Und sucht man nach grundsätzlichen interpretatorischen Unterschieden, so stößt man zuerst auf die von Mauermann erwähnten langsameren Tempi der späteren Fassungen. Die "beiläufige" Schnelligkeit, die man den DG-Einspielungen bisweilen vorgeworfen hat, sind abgelegt. Vor allem in den Adagio- und Andante-Sätzen wählt Kubelik in späteren Jahren langsamere Tempi, beispielsweise im dritten Satz der ersten Sinfonie, aufgenommen am 2. November 1979. "Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen" lautet die Satzbezeichnung, die Kubelik genau beachtet. Wunderbar baut er die Spannung auf, spielt das Crescendo aus, das allein durch das ständige Hinzutreten neuer Instrumente erreicht wird. Das Oboensolo ist überaus deutlich phrasiert, bildet im betonten Staccato einen Kontrapunkt zum Legato der Streicher. Das Parodistische des Satzes ist wesentlich besser getroffen als in der DG-Einspielung. Auch das "Ziemlich langsam" (Ziffer 5) wirkt in sich schlüssiger, man meint auf einmal einen Spielmannszug oder eine Klezmer-Kapelle zu hören.

Herrlich sind auch die ersten beiden Sätze des audite-Mitschnitts gelungen: "Wie ein Naturlaut" - kaum ein Dirigent
dürfte Mahlers Vorstellungen beim Beginn des ersten Satzes wohl so gut getroffen haben wie Kubelik in diesem Konzert. Dass die Stelle hier wesentlich überzeugender wirkt als in der DG-Einspielung, liegt auch in der Aufnahmetechnik begründet. Bei der Grammophon klingen die Stimmen isolierter, in der späteren Rundfunk-Aufnahme verschmelzen sie stärker: Das mindert etwas den analytischen Ansatz, verstärkt jedoch die Unmittelbarkeit der Naturstimmung. Hinzu kommt, dass das Orchester, besonders die Bläser, in der späteren Aufnahme noch souveräner wirken als in der ersten. Dass es sich um einen Konzertmitschnitt handelt, geht nirgendwo auf Kosten der künstlerischen Qualität. Das spricht für eine intensive Probenarbeit.

Die wesentlich bessere Aufnahmetechnik ist übrigens ein Charakteristikum, das fast alle audite-Produktionen auszeichnet. Die Konzertmitschnitte besitzen mehr räumliche Tiefe. Während die DG-Aufnahmen sehr auf Transparenz bedacht sind und immer wieder einzelne Instrumente oder Gruppen nach vorn ziehen, meint man bei den Rundfunkmitschnitten, wirklich ein Orchester im Saal der Residenz zu erleben. Und die Live-Aufnahme der neunten Sinfonie aus Tokios Bunka Kaikan Concert Hall klingt im Vergleich deutlich flacher als die Münchner Aufnahmen.

Was Kubeliks Mahler-Aufnahmen auch noch denen bei audite - gelegentlich fehlt, das ist die mitreißende Kraft, mit der sich etwa Bernstein in die schnellen Sätze warf. Das Finale der ersten Sinfonie ("Stürmisch bewegt") beispielsweise oder der zweite Satz der ansonsten interpretatorisch überzeugenden fünften ("Stürmisch bewegt, mit größer Vehemenz") weisen in dieser Hinsicht Defizite auf.

Den stärksten Eindruck der audite-Mitschnitte hinterlassen nicht zufällig jene Sinfonien, die solche Satzcharaktere
weitesgehend aussparen: die zweite und die siebte Sinfonie. So war der 8. Oktober 1982 ein wirklicher Glückstag für die Geschichte der Mahler-Interpretation. Denn Kubelik dirigierte die zweite an diesem Tag wie aus einem Guss: Alles fließt, nichts wirkt forciert im Allegro maestoso. Ein ungemein feinsinniges, schwereloses Musizieren zeichnet das Andante aus. Herrlich setzt Kubelik das Scherzo um. Das böhmisch-mährische Musikantentum - dem Ingo Harden einst so zweifelnd gegenüberstand - ist hier prächtig zu finden. Die Fischpredigt hält Kubelik leider nicht ganz so ironisch wie Bernstein. Dafür hat er mit Brigitte Fassbaender einen Alt, der das "Röschen rot" mit hinreißendem Timbre und klarer, sinnhaltiger Artikulation versieht. Im hervorragend gesteigerten Finale bilden Edith Mathis und Brigitte Fassbaender ein Traumpaar.

Genauso überragend ist die gerade auf CD erschienene siebte Sinfonie gestaltet. Sehr organisch meisterte Kubelik am 5. Februar 1976 die ständigen Tempowechsel im ersten Satz. Zauberhaft, dunkel getönt kommen die Nachtmusiken auf CD daher. Das Scherzo nimmt von Anfang an gefangen und lässt den Hörer nicht mehr los. Selbst das apotheotische Finale, mit dem viele Dirigenten Probleme haben, klingt bei Kubelik sinnvoll. Das Pathos wirkt nicht übertrieben, aber die Zuversicht bleibt.

Fazit: Mit diesen Mahler-Veröffentlichungen ist audite ein großer Wurf gelungen. Und wer bei Kubelik auf den Geschmack gekommen ist, der kann bei demselben Label auch noch hervorragende Mitschnitte von Beethoven- und vor allem Mozart-Konzerten bekommen, die Clifford Curzon mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks unter Kubelik in der Residenz gegeben hat. Aber Clifford Curzon ist schon wieder ein Thema für sich.
Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 4/01 | Gregor Willmes | April 1, 2001 Mahler ohne Manierismen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein AndenkenMehr lesen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken besonders, indem sie kontinuierlich Rundfunkmitschnitte des bedeutenden Dirigenten erstmals auf Tonträger präsentiert. Gregor Willmes hat die bei audite erschienenen Mahler-Aufnahmen mit denen der legendären Gesamteinspielung für die Deutsche Grammophon verglichen.

Der Durchbruch Gustav Mahlers fand nicht im Konzertsaal statt. Zwar gab es nach seinem Tod einige Dirigenten, die wie Willem Mengelberg, Otto Klemperer und Bruno Walter Mahler noch kennen gelernt hatten und sich nachdrücklich auch im Konzertsaal für seine Sinfonien einsetzten. Doch verdankt Mahler mit Sicherheit seine Popularität zum großen Teil der Stereo-Schallplatte. Seine Sinfonien schienen wie geschaffen dazu, die Möglichkeiten der Studio-Technik darzustellen. So klingen die riesigen Sinfonien auf Tonträger oftmals sogar transparenter, als sie es im Konzertsaal je vermögen.

Leonard Bernstein war der erste, der Mitte der 60er Jahre mit dem New York Philharmonic für CBS (heute Sony) eine Gesamtaufnahme der Mahlerschen Sinfonien schuf, allerdings ohne das Adagio der unvollendeten Zehnten. Ihm folgte Rafael Kubelik, der mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zwischen 1967 und 1971 im Herkules-Saal der Münchener Residenz alle Neune und den Adagio-Satz der Zehnten aufzeichnen ließ. Nur kurze Zeit später erschienen noch Gesamtaufnahmen von Bernard Haitink (Philips) und Georg Solti (Decca).

Ingo Harden zog im Dezember 1971 im Fono Form folgendes Fazit bezüglich der Kubelik-Aufnahmen: "Alles in allem: Der zweite vollständige Mahler-Zyklus hat in der Reihe der Mahler-Interpretationen der Gegenwart sein durchaus eigenes Profil, da sich von Bernsteins Aufnahmen durch ein Weniger an Leidenschaft und Pathos, ein Mehr an orchestraler Detailarbeit, einen helleren Grundton und eine emotional mehr den Mittelkurs haltende Darstellung unterscheidet." Harden stellte das Bild von Kubeliks "böhmischen Musikantentum" infrage, ohne es ganz abzustreiten, lobte darüber hinaus besonders die "sehr subtil und genau alle Klangfarben der Partituren aufschlüsselnden Aufführungen". In beidem ist Harden wohl Recht zu geben, wobei man nach meinem Dafürhalten allerdings Kubeliks tschechischen Wurzeln auch nicht unterschätzen soll, obwohl er sich (worauf Francis Drésel in seinem Aufsatz "Rafael Kubelik - Musiker und Poet" überzeugend hingewiesen hat) wie Mahler nach und nach "germanisiert" hat.

Rafael Kubelik wurde am 29. Juni 1914 in Bychorie bei Prag als Sohn des berühmten Geigen-Virtuosen Jan Kubelik geboren. Er studierte am Konservatorium in Prag Geige, Klavier, Dirigieren und Komposition. Er zählte also zu jener Kategorie von Mahler-Dirigenten, die wie Furtwängler und Klemperer oder wie später Bernstein und Boulez auch als Komponisten hervorgetreten sind. Das lässt vielleicht einerseits besser verstehen, warum Kubelik die musikalischen Zusammen hänge in Mahlers komplexen Sinfonien so einleuchtend darstellen konnte. Andererseits sagt das Komponisten-Dasein allein wieder auch nicht so viel über den Interpretationsstil aus, wenn man etwa an die Unterschiede zwischen Bernsteins expressivem und Boulez' analytischem Zugriff auf Mahler denkt.

Rafael Kubelik lernte Mahlers Sinfonien bereits in seiner Jugend in Prag kennen, zumeist dirigiert von Vaclav Talich,
aber auch von Gastdirigenten wie Bruno Walter, Otto Klemperer und Erich Kleiber. Für Kleibers Aufführung von Mahlers siebter Sinfonie leitete der 24-jährige Kubelik 1938 sogar die ersten Proben mit der Tschechischen Philharmonie.

Schnell machte Kubelik Karriere: 1939 wurde er Musikdirektor der Oper in Brünn, 1942 Leiter der Tschechischen Philharmonie. Später übernahm er Chefpositionen beim Chicago Symphony Orchestra und an den Opernhäusern Covent Garden London und Metropolitan New York. Seine zweite Heimat - nach Prag - wurde allerdings München, wo er von 1961 bis 1971 als Chefdirigent und noch bis 1985 als regelmäßiger Gast das Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zu außergewöhnlichen Erfolgen führte.

Laut Erich Mauermann, dem damaligen Orchesterdirektor, war Kubelik der erste Dirigent der in München einen kompletten Mahler-Zyklus durchführte. Da er Mahlers Werke immer wieder auf den Spielplan setzte, sind einige Konzertmitschnitte erhalten, die jetzt nach und nach bei audite auf CD erscheinen. Friedrich Mauermann, Bruder von Erich Mauermann und mittlerweile in den Ruhestand getretener Ex-Chef von audite Schallplatten, hat die Reihe initiiert und dabei auf das Archiv des Bayerischen Rundfunks zurückgegriffen. Bei den Sinfonien eins, zwei und fünf hatte er sogar jeweils die Auswahl zwischen zwei verschiedenen Mitschnitten. "Wenn mehrere Aufnahmen derselben Sinfonie vorhanden waren", so Mauermann, "habe ich immer die jüngere genommen. Einerseits wegen des besseren Klangbildes, andererseits wegen der musikalischen Qualität. Die Gesamtzeiten der jüngeren Aufnahmen sind generell länger als die der älteren. Die Musik atmet mehr."

Die bisher veröffentlichten Mitschnitte der Sinfonien eins, zwei, fünf, sieben und neun stammen aus den Jahren 1975 und 1982 und wurden bis auf die neunte alle im Münchner Herkules Saal aufgenommen. Folgen sollen noch Mitschnitte der Sinfonien drei (1967) und sechs (1968), ebenfalls aus dem Herkules-Saal.

Somit stammen die bis jetzt vorliegenden Aufnahmen aus einer Zeit, die nach den Grammophon-Aufnahmen liegt. Und sucht man nach grundsätzlichen interpretatorischen Unterschieden, so stößt man zuerst auf die von Mauermann erwähnten langsameren Tempi der späteren Fassungen. Die "beiläufige" Schnelligkeit, die man den DG-Einspielungen bisweilen vorgeworfen hat, sind abgelegt. Vor allem in den Adagio- und Andante-Sätzen wählt Kubelik in späteren Jahren langsamere Tempi, beispielsweise im dritten Satz der ersten Sinfonie, aufgenommen am 2. November 1979. "Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen" lautet die Satzbezeichnung, die Kubelik genau beachtet. Wunderbar baut er die Spannung auf, spielt das Crescendo aus, das allein durch das ständige Hinzutreten neuer Instrumente erreicht wird. Das Oboensolo ist überaus deutlich phrasiert, bildet im betonten Staccato einen Kontrapunkt zum Legato der Streicher. Das Parodistische des Satzes ist wesentlich besser getroffen als in der DG-Einspielung. Auch das "Ziemlich langsam" (Ziffer 5) wirkt in sich schlüssiger, man meint auf einmal einen Spielmannszug oder eine Klezmer-Kapelle zu hören.

Herrlich sind auch die ersten beiden Sätze des audite-Mitschnitts gelungen: "Wie ein Naturlaut" - kaum ein Dirigent
dürfte Mahlers Vorstellungen beim Beginn des ersten Satzes wohl so gut getroffen haben wie Kubelik in diesem Konzert. Dass die Stelle hier wesentlich überzeugender wirkt als in der DG-Einspielung, liegt auch in der Aufnahmetechnik begründet. Bei der Grammophon klingen die Stimmen isolierter, in der späteren Rundfunk-Aufnahme verschmelzen sie stärker: Das mindert etwas den analytischen Ansatz, verstärkt jedoch die Unmittelbarkeit der Naturstimmung. Hinzu kommt, dass das Orchester, besonders die Bläser, in der späteren Aufnahme noch souveräner wirken als in der ersten. Dass es sich um einen Konzertmitschnitt handelt, geht nirgendwo auf Kosten der künstlerischen Qualität. Das spricht für eine intensive Probenarbeit.

Die wesentlich bessere Aufnahmetechnik ist übrigens ein Charakteristikum, das fast alle audite-Produktionen auszeichnet. Die Konzertmitschnitte besitzen mehr räumliche Tiefe. Während die DG-Aufnahmen sehr auf Transparenz bedacht sind und immer wieder einzelne Instrumente oder Gruppen nach vorn ziehen, meint man bei den Rundfunkmitschnitten, wirklich ein Orchester im Saal der Residenz zu erleben. Und die Live-Aufnahme der neunten Sinfonie aus Tokios Bunka Kaikan Concert Hall klingt im Vergleich deutlich flacher als die Münchner Aufnahmen.

Was Kubeliks Mahler-Aufnahmen auch noch denen bei audite - gelegentlich fehlt, das ist die mitreißende Kraft, mit der sich etwa Bernstein in die schnellen Sätze warf. Das Finale der ersten Sinfonie ("Stürmisch bewegt") beispielsweise oder der zweite Satz der ansonsten interpretatorisch überzeugenden fünften ("Stürmisch bewegt, mit größer Vehemenz") weisen in dieser Hinsicht Defizite auf.

Den stärksten Eindruck der audite-Mitschnitte hinterlassen nicht zufällig jene Sinfonien, die solche Satzcharaktere
weitesgehend aussparen: die zweite und die siebte Sinfonie. So war der 8. Oktober 1982 ein wirklicher Glückstag für die Geschichte der Mahler-Interpretation. Denn Kubelik dirigierte die zweite an diesem Tag wie aus einem Guss: Alles fließt, nichts wirkt forciert im Allegro maestoso. Ein ungemein feinsinniges, schwereloses Musizieren zeichnet das Andante aus. Herrlich setzt Kubelik das Scherzo um. Das böhmisch-mährische Musikantentum - dem Ingo Harden einst so zweifelnd gegenüberstand - ist hier prächtig zu finden. Die Fischpredigt hält Kubelik leider nicht ganz so ironisch wie Bernstein. Dafür hat er mit Brigitte Fassbaender einen Alt, der das "Röschen rot" mit hinreißendem Timbre und klarer, sinnhaltiger Artikulation versieht. Im hervorragend gesteigerten Finale bilden Edith Mathis und Brigitte Fassbaender ein Traumpaar.

Genauso überragend ist die gerade auf CD erschienene siebte Sinfonie gestaltet. Sehr organisch meisterte Kubelik am 5. Februar 1976 die ständigen Tempowechsel im ersten Satz. Zauberhaft, dunkel getönt kommen die Nachtmusiken auf CD daher. Das Scherzo nimmt von Anfang an gefangen und lässt den Hörer nicht mehr los. Selbst das apotheotische Finale, mit dem viele Dirigenten Probleme haben, klingt bei Kubelik sinnvoll. Das Pathos wirkt nicht übertrieben, aber die Zuversicht bleibt.

Fazit: Mit diesen Mahler-Veröffentlichungen ist audite ein großer Wurf gelungen. Und wer bei Kubelik auf den Geschmack gekommen ist, der kann bei demselben Label auch noch hervorragende Mitschnitte von Beethoven- und vor allem Mozart-Konzerten bekommen, die Clifford Curzon mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks unter Kubelik in der Residenz gegeben hat. Aber Clifford Curzon ist schon wieder ein Thema für sich.
Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 4/01 | Gregor Willmes | April 1, 2001 Mahler ohne Manierismen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein AndenkenMehr lesen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken besonders, indem sie kontinuierlich Rundfunkmitschnitte des bedeutenden Dirigenten erstmals auf Tonträger präsentiert. Gregor Willmes hat die bei audite erschienenen Mahler-Aufnahmen mit denen der legendären Gesamteinspielung für die Deutsche Grammophon verglichen.

Der Durchbruch Gustav Mahlers fand nicht im Konzertsaal statt. Zwar gab es nach seinem Tod einige Dirigenten, die wie Willem Mengelberg, Otto Klemperer und Bruno Walter Mahler noch kennen gelernt hatten und sich nachdrücklich auch im Konzertsaal für seine Sinfonien einsetzten. Doch verdankt Mahler mit Sicherheit seine Popularität zum großen Teil der Stereo-Schallplatte. Seine Sinfonien schienen wie geschaffen dazu, die Möglichkeiten der Studio-Technik darzustellen. So klingen die riesigen Sinfonien auf Tonträger oftmals sogar transparenter, als sie es im Konzertsaal je vermögen.

Leonard Bernstein war der erste, der Mitte der 60er Jahre mit dem New York Philharmonic für CBS (heute Sony) eine Gesamtaufnahme der Mahlerschen Sinfonien schuf, allerdings ohne das Adagio der unvollendeten Zehnten. Ihm folgte Rafael Kubelik, der mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zwischen 1967 und 1971 im Herkules-Saal der Münchener Residenz alle Neune und den Adagio-Satz der Zehnten aufzeichnen ließ. Nur kurze Zeit später erschienen noch Gesamtaufnahmen von Bernard Haitink (Philips) und Georg Solti (Decca).

Ingo Harden zog im Dezember 1971 im Fono Form folgendes Fazit bezüglich der Kubelik-Aufnahmen: "Alles in allem: Der zweite vollständige Mahler-Zyklus hat in der Reihe der Mahler-Interpretationen der Gegenwart sein durchaus eigenes Profil, da sich von Bernsteins Aufnahmen durch ein Weniger an Leidenschaft und Pathos, ein Mehr an orchestraler Detailarbeit, einen helleren Grundton und eine emotional mehr den Mittelkurs haltende Darstellung unterscheidet." Harden stellte das Bild von Kubeliks "böhmischen Musikantentum" infrage, ohne es ganz abzustreiten, lobte darüber hinaus besonders die "sehr subtil und genau alle Klangfarben der Partituren aufschlüsselnden Aufführungen". In beidem ist Harden wohl Recht zu geben, wobei man nach meinem Dafürhalten allerdings Kubeliks tschechischen Wurzeln auch nicht unterschätzen soll, obwohl er sich (worauf Francis Drésel in seinem Aufsatz "Rafael Kubelik - Musiker und Poet" überzeugend hingewiesen hat) wie Mahler nach und nach "germanisiert" hat.

Rafael Kubelik wurde am 29. Juni 1914 in Bychorie bei Prag als Sohn des berühmten Geigen-Virtuosen Jan Kubelik geboren. Er studierte am Konservatorium in Prag Geige, Klavier, Dirigieren und Komposition. Er zählte also zu jener Kategorie von Mahler-Dirigenten, die wie Furtwängler und Klemperer oder wie später Bernstein und Boulez auch als Komponisten hervorgetreten sind. Das lässt vielleicht einerseits besser verstehen, warum Kubelik die musikalischen Zusammen hänge in Mahlers komplexen Sinfonien so einleuchtend darstellen konnte. Andererseits sagt das Komponisten-Dasein allein wieder auch nicht so viel über den Interpretationsstil aus, wenn man etwa an die Unterschiede zwischen Bernsteins expressivem und Boulez' analytischem Zugriff auf Mahler denkt.

Rafael Kubelik lernte Mahlers Sinfonien bereits in seiner Jugend in Prag kennen, zumeist dirigiert von Vaclav Talich,
aber auch von Gastdirigenten wie Bruno Walter, Otto Klemperer und Erich Kleiber. Für Kleibers Aufführung von Mahlers siebter Sinfonie leitete der 24-jährige Kubelik 1938 sogar die ersten Proben mit der Tschechischen Philharmonie.

Schnell machte Kubelik Karriere: 1939 wurde er Musikdirektor der Oper in Brünn, 1942 Leiter der Tschechischen Philharmonie. Später übernahm er Chefpositionen beim Chicago Symphony Orchestra und an den Opernhäusern Covent Garden London und Metropolitan New York. Seine zweite Heimat - nach Prag - wurde allerdings München, wo er von 1961 bis 1971 als Chefdirigent und noch bis 1985 als regelmäßiger Gast das Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zu außergewöhnlichen Erfolgen führte.

Laut Erich Mauermann, dem damaligen Orchesterdirektor, war Kubelik der erste Dirigent der in München einen kompletten Mahler-Zyklus durchführte. Da er Mahlers Werke immer wieder auf den Spielplan setzte, sind einige Konzertmitschnitte erhalten, die jetzt nach und nach bei audite auf CD erscheinen. Friedrich Mauermann, Bruder von Erich Mauermann und mittlerweile in den Ruhestand getretener Ex-Chef von audite Schallplatten, hat die Reihe initiiert und dabei auf das Archiv des Bayerischen Rundfunks zurückgegriffen. Bei den Sinfonien eins, zwei und fünf hatte er sogar jeweils die Auswahl zwischen zwei verschiedenen Mitschnitten. "Wenn mehrere Aufnahmen derselben Sinfonie vorhanden waren", so Mauermann, "habe ich immer die jüngere genommen. Einerseits wegen des besseren Klangbildes, andererseits wegen der musikalischen Qualität. Die Gesamtzeiten der jüngeren Aufnahmen sind generell länger als die der älteren. Die Musik atmet mehr."

Die bisher veröffentlichten Mitschnitte der Sinfonien eins, zwei, fünf, sieben und neun stammen aus den Jahren 1975 und 1982 und wurden bis auf die neunte alle im Münchner Herkules Saal aufgenommen. Folgen sollen noch Mitschnitte der Sinfonien drei (1967) und sechs (1968), ebenfalls aus dem Herkules-Saal.

Somit stammen die bis jetzt vorliegenden Aufnahmen aus einer Zeit, die nach den Grammophon-Aufnahmen liegt. Und sucht man nach grundsätzlichen interpretatorischen Unterschieden, so stößt man zuerst auf die von Mauermann erwähnten langsameren Tempi der späteren Fassungen. Die "beiläufige" Schnelligkeit, die man den DG-Einspielungen bisweilen vorgeworfen hat, sind abgelegt. Vor allem in den Adagio- und Andante-Sätzen wählt Kubelik in späteren Jahren langsamere Tempi, beispielsweise im dritten Satz der ersten Sinfonie, aufgenommen am 2. November 1979. "Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen" lautet die Satzbezeichnung, die Kubelik genau beachtet. Wunderbar baut er die Spannung auf, spielt das Crescendo aus, das allein durch das ständige Hinzutreten neuer Instrumente erreicht wird. Das Oboensolo ist überaus deutlich phrasiert, bildet im betonten Staccato einen Kontrapunkt zum Legato der Streicher. Das Parodistische des Satzes ist wesentlich besser getroffen als in der DG-Einspielung. Auch das "Ziemlich langsam" (Ziffer 5) wirkt in sich schlüssiger, man meint auf einmal einen Spielmannszug oder eine Klezmer-Kapelle zu hören.

Herrlich sind auch die ersten beiden Sätze des audite-Mitschnitts gelungen: "Wie ein Naturlaut" - kaum ein Dirigent
dürfte Mahlers Vorstellungen beim Beginn des ersten Satzes wohl so gut getroffen haben wie Kubelik in diesem Konzert. Dass die Stelle hier wesentlich überzeugender wirkt als in der DG-Einspielung, liegt auch in der Aufnahmetechnik begründet. Bei der Grammophon klingen die Stimmen isolierter, in der späteren Rundfunk-Aufnahme verschmelzen sie stärker: Das mindert etwas den analytischen Ansatz, verstärkt jedoch die Unmittelbarkeit der Naturstimmung. Hinzu kommt, dass das Orchester, besonders die Bläser, in der späteren Aufnahme noch souveräner wirken als in der ersten. Dass es sich um einen Konzertmitschnitt handelt, geht nirgendwo auf Kosten der künstlerischen Qualität. Das spricht für eine intensive Probenarbeit.

Die wesentlich bessere Aufnahmetechnik ist übrigens ein Charakteristikum, das fast alle audite-Produktionen auszeichnet. Die Konzertmitschnitte besitzen mehr räumliche Tiefe. Während die DG-Aufnahmen sehr auf Transparenz bedacht sind und immer wieder einzelne Instrumente oder Gruppen nach vorn ziehen, meint man bei den Rundfunkmitschnitten, wirklich ein Orchester im Saal der Residenz zu erleben. Und die Live-Aufnahme der neunten Sinfonie aus Tokios Bunka Kaikan Concert Hall klingt im Vergleich deutlich flacher als die Münchner Aufnahmen.

Was Kubeliks Mahler-Aufnahmen auch noch denen bei audite - gelegentlich fehlt, das ist die mitreißende Kraft, mit der sich etwa Bernstein in die schnellen Sätze warf. Das Finale der ersten Sinfonie ("Stürmisch bewegt") beispielsweise oder der zweite Satz der ansonsten interpretatorisch überzeugenden fünften ("Stürmisch bewegt, mit größer Vehemenz") weisen in dieser Hinsicht Defizite auf.

Den stärksten Eindruck der audite-Mitschnitte hinterlassen nicht zufällig jene Sinfonien, die solche Satzcharaktere
weitesgehend aussparen: die zweite und die siebte Sinfonie. So war der 8. Oktober 1982 ein wirklicher Glückstag für die Geschichte der Mahler-Interpretation. Denn Kubelik dirigierte die zweite an diesem Tag wie aus einem Guss: Alles fließt, nichts wirkt forciert im Allegro maestoso. Ein ungemein feinsinniges, schwereloses Musizieren zeichnet das Andante aus. Herrlich setzt Kubelik das Scherzo um. Das böhmisch-mährische Musikantentum - dem Ingo Harden einst so zweifelnd gegenüberstand - ist hier prächtig zu finden. Die Fischpredigt hält Kubelik leider nicht ganz so ironisch wie Bernstein. Dafür hat er mit Brigitte Fassbaender einen Alt, der das "Röschen rot" mit hinreißendem Timbre und klarer, sinnhaltiger Artikulation versieht. Im hervorragend gesteigerten Finale bilden Edith Mathis und Brigitte Fassbaender ein Traumpaar.

Genauso überragend ist die gerade auf CD erschienene siebte Sinfonie gestaltet. Sehr organisch meisterte Kubelik am 5. Februar 1976 die ständigen Tempowechsel im ersten Satz. Zauberhaft, dunkel getönt kommen die Nachtmusiken auf CD daher. Das Scherzo nimmt von Anfang an gefangen und lässt den Hörer nicht mehr los. Selbst das apotheotische Finale, mit dem viele Dirigenten Probleme haben, klingt bei Kubelik sinnvoll. Das Pathos wirkt nicht übertrieben, aber die Zuversicht bleibt.

Fazit: Mit diesen Mahler-Veröffentlichungen ist audite ein großer Wurf gelungen. Und wer bei Kubelik auf den Geschmack gekommen ist, der kann bei demselben Label auch noch hervorragende Mitschnitte von Beethoven- und vor allem Mozart-Konzerten bekommen, die Clifford Curzon mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks unter Kubelik in der Residenz gegeben hat. Aber Clifford Curzon ist schon wieder ein Thema für sich.
Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken

Das Orchester | 04/2001 | Werner Bodendorff | April 1, 2001

Es gibt noch glückliche Umstände, bei denen sich wirklich allesMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Es gibt noch glückliche Umstände, bei denen sich wirklich alles

Fono Forum
Fono Forum | 4/01 | Gregor Willmes | April 1, 2001 Mahler ohne Manierismen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein AndenkenMehr lesen

Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken besonders, indem sie kontinuierlich Rundfunkmitschnitte des bedeutenden Dirigenten erstmals auf Tonträger präsentiert. Gregor Willmes hat die bei audite erschienenen Mahler-Aufnahmen mit denen der legendären Gesamteinspielung für die Deutsche Grammophon verglichen.

Der Durchbruch Gustav Mahlers fand nicht im Konzertsaal statt. Zwar gab es nach seinem Tod einige Dirigenten, die wie Willem Mengelberg, Otto Klemperer und Bruno Walter Mahler noch kennen gelernt hatten und sich nachdrücklich auch im Konzertsaal für seine Sinfonien einsetzten. Doch verdankt Mahler mit Sicherheit seine Popularität zum großen Teil der Stereo-Schallplatte. Seine Sinfonien schienen wie geschaffen dazu, die Möglichkeiten der Studio-Technik darzustellen. So klingen die riesigen Sinfonien auf Tonträger oftmals sogar transparenter, als sie es im Konzertsaal je vermögen.

Leonard Bernstein war der erste, der Mitte der 60er Jahre mit dem New York Philharmonic für CBS (heute Sony) eine Gesamtaufnahme der Mahlerschen Sinfonien schuf, allerdings ohne das Adagio der unvollendeten Zehnten. Ihm folgte Rafael Kubelik, der mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zwischen 1967 und 1971 im Herkules-Saal der Münchener Residenz alle Neune und den Adagio-Satz der Zehnten aufzeichnen ließ. Nur kurze Zeit später erschienen noch Gesamtaufnahmen von Bernard Haitink (Philips) und Georg Solti (Decca).

Ingo Harden zog im Dezember 1971 im Fono Form folgendes Fazit bezüglich der Kubelik-Aufnahmen: "Alles in allem: Der zweite vollständige Mahler-Zyklus hat in der Reihe der Mahler-Interpretationen der Gegenwart sein durchaus eigenes Profil, da sich von Bernsteins Aufnahmen durch ein Weniger an Leidenschaft und Pathos, ein Mehr an orchestraler Detailarbeit, einen helleren Grundton und eine emotional mehr den Mittelkurs haltende Darstellung unterscheidet." Harden stellte das Bild von Kubeliks "böhmischen Musikantentum" infrage, ohne es ganz abzustreiten, lobte darüber hinaus besonders die "sehr subtil und genau alle Klangfarben der Partituren aufschlüsselnden Aufführungen". In beidem ist Harden wohl Recht zu geben, wobei man nach meinem Dafürhalten allerdings Kubeliks tschechischen Wurzeln auch nicht unterschätzen soll, obwohl er sich (worauf Francis Drésel in seinem Aufsatz "Rafael Kubelik - Musiker und Poet" überzeugend hingewiesen hat) wie Mahler nach und nach "germanisiert" hat.

Rafael Kubelik wurde am 29. Juni 1914 in Bychorie bei Prag als Sohn des berühmten Geigen-Virtuosen Jan Kubelik geboren. Er studierte am Konservatorium in Prag Geige, Klavier, Dirigieren und Komposition. Er zählte also zu jener Kategorie von Mahler-Dirigenten, die wie Furtwängler und Klemperer oder wie später Bernstein und Boulez auch als Komponisten hervorgetreten sind. Das lässt vielleicht einerseits besser verstehen, warum Kubelik die musikalischen Zusammen hänge in Mahlers komplexen Sinfonien so einleuchtend darstellen konnte. Andererseits sagt das Komponisten-Dasein allein wieder auch nicht so viel über den Interpretationsstil aus, wenn man etwa an die Unterschiede zwischen Bernsteins expressivem und Boulez' analytischem Zugriff auf Mahler denkt.

Rafael Kubelik lernte Mahlers Sinfonien bereits in seiner Jugend in Prag kennen, zumeist dirigiert von Vaclav Talich,
aber auch von Gastdirigenten wie Bruno Walter, Otto Klemperer und Erich Kleiber. Für Kleibers Aufführung von Mahlers siebter Sinfonie leitete der 24-jährige Kubelik 1938 sogar die ersten Proben mit der Tschechischen Philharmonie.

Schnell machte Kubelik Karriere: 1939 wurde er Musikdirektor der Oper in Brünn, 1942 Leiter der Tschechischen Philharmonie. Später übernahm er Chefpositionen beim Chicago Symphony Orchestra und an den Opernhäusern Covent Garden London und Metropolitan New York. Seine zweite Heimat - nach Prag - wurde allerdings München, wo er von 1961 bis 1971 als Chefdirigent und noch bis 1985 als regelmäßiger Gast das Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks zu außergewöhnlichen Erfolgen führte.

Laut Erich Mauermann, dem damaligen Orchesterdirektor, war Kubelik der erste Dirigent der in München einen kompletten Mahler-Zyklus durchführte. Da er Mahlers Werke immer wieder auf den Spielplan setzte, sind einige Konzertmitschnitte erhalten, die jetzt nach und nach bei audite auf CD erscheinen. Friedrich Mauermann, Bruder von Erich Mauermann und mittlerweile in den Ruhestand getretener Ex-Chef von audite Schallplatten, hat die Reihe initiiert und dabei auf das Archiv des Bayerischen Rundfunks zurückgegriffen. Bei den Sinfonien eins, zwei und fünf hatte er sogar jeweils die Auswahl zwischen zwei verschiedenen Mitschnitten. "Wenn mehrere Aufnahmen derselben Sinfonie vorhanden waren", so Mauermann, "habe ich immer die jüngere genommen. Einerseits wegen des besseren Klangbildes, andererseits wegen der musikalischen Qualität. Die Gesamtzeiten der jüngeren Aufnahmen sind generell länger als die der älteren. Die Musik atmet mehr."

Die bisher veröffentlichten Mitschnitte der Sinfonien eins, zwei, fünf, sieben und neun stammen aus den Jahren 1975 und 1982 und wurden bis auf die neunte alle im Münchner Herkules Saal aufgenommen. Folgen sollen noch Mitschnitte der Sinfonien drei (1967) und sechs (1968), ebenfalls aus dem Herkules-Saal.

Somit stammen die bis jetzt vorliegenden Aufnahmen aus einer Zeit, die nach den Grammophon-Aufnahmen liegt. Und sucht man nach grundsätzlichen interpretatorischen Unterschieden, so stößt man zuerst auf die von Mauermann erwähnten langsameren Tempi der späteren Fassungen. Die "beiläufige" Schnelligkeit, die man den DG-Einspielungen bisweilen vorgeworfen hat, sind abgelegt. Vor allem in den Adagio- und Andante-Sätzen wählt Kubelik in späteren Jahren langsamere Tempi, beispielsweise im dritten Satz der ersten Sinfonie, aufgenommen am 2. November 1979. "Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen" lautet die Satzbezeichnung, die Kubelik genau beachtet. Wunderbar baut er die Spannung auf, spielt das Crescendo aus, das allein durch das ständige Hinzutreten neuer Instrumente erreicht wird. Das Oboensolo ist überaus deutlich phrasiert, bildet im betonten Staccato einen Kontrapunkt zum Legato der Streicher. Das Parodistische des Satzes ist wesentlich besser getroffen als in der DG-Einspielung. Auch das "Ziemlich langsam" (Ziffer 5) wirkt in sich schlüssiger, man meint auf einmal einen Spielmannszug oder eine Klezmer-Kapelle zu hören.

Herrlich sind auch die ersten beiden Sätze des audite-Mitschnitts gelungen: "Wie ein Naturlaut" - kaum ein Dirigent
dürfte Mahlers Vorstellungen beim Beginn des ersten Satzes wohl so gut getroffen haben wie Kubelik in diesem Konzert. Dass die Stelle hier wesentlich überzeugender wirkt als in der DG-Einspielung, liegt auch in der Aufnahmetechnik begründet. Bei der Grammophon klingen die Stimmen isolierter, in der späteren Rundfunk-Aufnahme verschmelzen sie stärker: Das mindert etwas den analytischen Ansatz, verstärkt jedoch die Unmittelbarkeit der Naturstimmung. Hinzu kommt, dass das Orchester, besonders die Bläser, in der späteren Aufnahme noch souveräner wirken als in der ersten. Dass es sich um einen Konzertmitschnitt handelt, geht nirgendwo auf Kosten der künstlerischen Qualität. Das spricht für eine intensive Probenarbeit.

Die wesentlich bessere Aufnahmetechnik ist übrigens ein Charakteristikum, das fast alle audite-Produktionen auszeichnet. Die Konzertmitschnitte besitzen mehr räumliche Tiefe. Während die DG-Aufnahmen sehr auf Transparenz bedacht sind und immer wieder einzelne Instrumente oder Gruppen nach vorn ziehen, meint man bei den Rundfunkmitschnitten, wirklich ein Orchester im Saal der Residenz zu erleben. Und die Live-Aufnahme der neunten Sinfonie aus Tokios Bunka Kaikan Concert Hall klingt im Vergleich deutlich flacher als die Münchner Aufnahmen.

Was Kubeliks Mahler-Aufnahmen auch noch denen bei audite - gelegentlich fehlt, das ist die mitreißende Kraft, mit der sich etwa Bernstein in die schnellen Sätze warf. Das Finale der ersten Sinfonie ("Stürmisch bewegt") beispielsweise oder der zweite Satz der ansonsten interpretatorisch überzeugenden fünften ("Stürmisch bewegt, mit größer Vehemenz") weisen in dieser Hinsicht Defizite auf.

Den stärksten Eindruck der audite-Mitschnitte hinterlassen nicht zufällig jene Sinfonien, die solche Satzcharaktere
weitesgehend aussparen: die zweite und die siebte Sinfonie. So war der 8. Oktober 1982 ein wirklicher Glückstag für die Geschichte der Mahler-Interpretation. Denn Kubelik dirigierte die zweite an diesem Tag wie aus einem Guss: Alles fließt, nichts wirkt forciert im Allegro maestoso. Ein ungemein feinsinniges, schwereloses Musizieren zeichnet das Andante aus. Herrlich setzt Kubelik das Scherzo um. Das böhmisch-mährische Musikantentum - dem Ingo Harden einst so zweifelnd gegenüberstand - ist hier prächtig zu finden. Die Fischpredigt hält Kubelik leider nicht ganz so ironisch wie Bernstein. Dafür hat er mit Brigitte Fassbaender einen Alt, der das "Röschen rot" mit hinreißendem Timbre und klarer, sinnhaltiger Artikulation versieht. Im hervorragend gesteigerten Finale bilden Edith Mathis und Brigitte Fassbaender ein Traumpaar.

Genauso überragend ist die gerade auf CD erschienene siebte Sinfonie gestaltet. Sehr organisch meisterte Kubelik am 5. Februar 1976 die ständigen Tempowechsel im ersten Satz. Zauberhaft, dunkel getönt kommen die Nachtmusiken auf CD daher. Das Scherzo nimmt von Anfang an gefangen und lässt den Hörer nicht mehr los. Selbst das apotheotische Finale, mit dem viele Dirigenten Probleme haben, klingt bei Kubelik sinnvoll. Das Pathos wirkt nicht übertrieben, aber die Zuversicht bleibt.

Fazit: Mit diesen Mahler-Veröffentlichungen ist audite ein großer Wurf gelungen. Und wer bei Kubelik auf den Geschmack gekommen ist, der kann bei demselben Label auch noch hervorragende Mitschnitte von Beethoven- und vor allem Mozart-Konzerten bekommen, die Clifford Curzon mit dem Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks unter Kubelik in der Residenz gegeben hat. Aber Clifford Curzon ist schon wieder ein Thema für sich.
Im August jährt sich der Todestag von Rafael Kubelik zum fünften Mal. Die kleine, aber feine Schallplattenfirma audite pflegt sein Andenken

klassik.com | 28.03.2001 | Shigero Fukui-Fauser | March 28, 2001

Fast beste Interpretation wie Bernsteins 1.Aufnahme mit NY Phil.Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Fast beste Interpretation wie Bernsteins 1.Aufnahme mit NY Phil.

Die Rheinpfalz
Die Rheinpfalz | 20.03.2001 | gt | March 20, 2001 Die Erste mit Kubelik

Rafael Kubelik gehörte zu den Dirigenten, die sich schon für die SinfonikMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik gehörte zu den Dirigenten, die sich schon für die Sinfonik

Klassik heute
Klassik heute | 3/2001 | Hanspeter Krellmann | March 1, 2001

Kubelik war hierzulande Ende der sechziger, Anfang der siebziger JahreMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Kubelik war hierzulande Ende der sechziger, Anfang der siebziger Jahre

Klassik heute
Klassik heute | 3/2001 | Hanspeter Krellmann | March 1, 2001

Kubelik war hierzulande Ende der sechziger, Anfang der siebziger JahreMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Kubelik war hierzulande Ende der sechziger, Anfang der siebziger Jahre

Coburger Tagesblatt
Coburger Tagesblatt | 19.02.2001 | J. B. | February 19, 2001 Kubelik als Mahler-Interpret

Er war ein Dirigent mit bemerkenswerten internationalem Renommee, alsMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Er war ein Dirigent mit bemerkenswerten internationalem Renommee, als

Coburger Tagesblatt
Coburger Tagesblatt | 19.02.2001 | J. B. | February 19, 2001 Kubelik als Mahler-Interpret

Er war ein Dirigent mit bemerkenswerten internationalem Renommee, alsMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Er war ein Dirigent mit bemerkenswerten internationalem Renommee, als

www.buch.de
www.buch.de | 16.02.2001 | Olaf Behrens | February 16, 2001

Die Mahler - Interpretationen von Rafael Kubelik haben in den LiveMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die Mahler - Interpretationen von Rafael Kubelik haben in den Live

www.buch.de
www.buch.de | 16.02.2001 | Olaf Behrens | February 16, 2001

Es muß schon ein wirklich großes Konzertereignis in München gewesenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Es muß schon ein wirklich großes Konzertereignis in München gewesen

Classica
Classica | Février 2001 | Stéphane Friédérich | February 1, 2001

Suite de l’intégrale (après les Symphonies n°1, n°4, n°5 et n° 9)Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Suite de l’intégrale (après les Symphonies n°1, n°4, n°5 et n° 9)

Stuttgarter Zeitung
Stuttgarter Zeitung | 31. Januar 2001 | Götz Thieme | January 31, 2001

Aus vergangenen Zeiten – Rafael Kubelik dirigiert Mahlers zweiteMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Aus vergangenen Zeiten – Rafael Kubelik dirigiert Mahlers zweite

Luxemburger Wort
Luxemburger Wort | 30.01.2001 | tw | January 30, 2001

Rafael Kubelik gehörte zu den Dirigenten, die sich schon für die SinfonikMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik gehörte zu den Dirigenten, die sich schon für die Sinfonik

Rondo
Rondo | 25.01.2001 | Christoph Braun | January 25, 2001

Vielleicht sollte man sich, wenn das Jahr noch so jung und vollerMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Vielleicht sollte man sich, wenn das Jahr noch so jung und voller

Rondo
Rondo | 11.01.2001 | Oliver Buslau | January 11, 2001

Rafael Kubelík war einer der Pioniere der Mahler-Renaissance. Ob dies nunMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelík war einer der Pioniere der Mahler-Renaissance. Ob dies nun

fermate
fermate | Heft 20/1 | Christoph Dohr | January 1, 2001

Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen RundfunksMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

Video Pratique
Video Pratique | Janvier - Février 2001 | Michel Jakubowicz | January 1, 2001

Mahler, le visionnaire, ne pouvait qu’être tenté de mettre en musiqueMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mahler, le visionnaire, ne pouvait qu’être tenté de mettre en musique

fermate
fermate | 1/2001 | Christoph Dohr | January 1, 2001

Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen RundfunksMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

fermate
fermate | 1/2001 | Christoph Dohr | January 1, 2001

Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen RundfunksMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

fermate
fermate | 1/2001 | Christoph Dohr | January 1, 2001

Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen RundfunksMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

Le Monde de la Musique
Le Monde de la Musique | Janvier 2001 | January 1, 2001

Réalisé en public à la Herkulessaal à Munich, cet enregistrement plonge l’auditeur dans l’atmosphère si particulière de concert : bruitsMehr lesen

Réalisé en public à la Herkulessaal à Munich, cet enregistrement plonge l’auditeur dans l’atmosphère si particulière de concert : bruits (discrets) de salle, écoute collective, spatialisation des pupitres exemplaire de naturel (jusqu’aux instruments placés en coulisses de la finale). Si tout cela n’a rien de spectaculaire, l’ensemble sonne avec une rare crédibilité dans une acoustique très « haute de plafond » : le spectre est large (percussions), les cordes opulentes et chaque intervention soliste reste inscrite dans le périmètre orchestral. Un modèle de réalisme.
Réalisé en public à la Herkulessaal à Munich, cet enregistrement plonge l’auditeur dans l’atmosphère si particulière de concert : bruits

Le Monde de la Musique
Le Monde de la Musique | Janvier 2001 | Patrick Szersnovicz | January 1, 2001

Première des symphonies de Mahler à utiliser les voix, la Deuxième Symphonie « Résurrection » (1888-1894) constitue aussi le premier voletMehr lesen

Première des symphonies de Mahler à utiliser les voix, la Deuxième Symphonie « Résurrection » (1888-1894) constitue aussi le premier volet d’une trilogie faisant référence aux lieder inspirés du Knaben Wunderhorn. Mahler élabora plusieurs programmes rejetés par la suite, mais l’idée centrale de cette œuvre, peut-être sa plus ambitieuse, n’en reste pas moins le problème de la vie et de la mort résolu par la résurrection, préparée et obtenue de haute lutte. La Deuxième Symphonie, avant la Huitième, fut la plus facilement acceptée du vivant du compositeur. Avec Le Chant de la Terre, c’est l’œuvre avec laquelle on apprend le plus souvent à aimer Mahler.

Après de remarquables Cinquième et Neuvième Symphonies et une splendide Première (« Choc »), toutes trois enregistrées « live », Audite Schallplatten propose un nouvel inédit de ce cycle de concerts Mahler/Kubelik/Radio bavaroise. Plus subtil, plus libre, plus interrogatif et moins uniment fébrile et tragique que dans sa version de studio « officielle » avec le même orchestre. (DG, 1969), Rafael Kubelik, dans cet enregistrement du 8 octobre 1982 réalisé à la Herkulessaal de la Résidence de Munich, offre une vision supérieurement équilibrée (tempos), étonnante de lyrisme et de mystère, malgré une conception d’ensemble plutôt pessimiste. Sa direction épique, dynamique, dégage l’aura fantastique et la profondeur poétique de l’œuvre en offrant une puissance et une unité narrative en situation. Mais Kubelik évite le pathos tout en exaltant le grand souffle, la densité, la variété des coloris. Les transitions, si difficiles à réussir dans cette partition, tiennent du miracle.
Première des symphonies de Mahler à utiliser les voix, la Deuxième Symphonie « Résurrection » (1888-1894) constitue aussi le premier volet

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | 01.01.2001 | David Hurwitz | January 1, 2001

Rafael Kubelik seems to be enjoying a second career since his death, thanksMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik seems to be enjoying a second career since his death, thanks

Musikmarkt
Musikmarkt | 37/2000 | December 1, 2000

Rafael Kubelik (1914-1996) hat als Chef des Sinfonieorchesters desMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik (1914-1996) hat als Chef des Sinfonieorchesters des

Crescendo
Crescendo | 12/2000 | TR | December 1, 2000

Mit zwei weiteren Konzertmitschnitten von Rafael Kubelik gelingt es AuditeMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mit zwei weiteren Konzertmitschnitten von Rafael Kubelik gelingt es Audite

Pizzicato ALT Supersonic
Pizzicato | 12/2000 | Rémy Franck | December 1, 2000 Todes-Symphonie

Wie schon in den Symphonien Nr. 1 und 5, die dieser Neunten vorausgingen, zeigt sich Raphael Kubelik auch in diesem Konzertmitschnitt wieder alsMehr lesen

Wie schon in den Symphonien Nr. 1 und 5, die dieser Neunten vorausgingen, zeigt sich Raphael Kubelik auch in diesem Konzertmitschnitt wieder als herausragender Mahler-Dirigent.

Es ist schon aufregend, wie er den ersten Satz der 9. Symphonie mit seinen Todesahnungen so überaus zerklüftet darstellt. Auch das Täppisch-derbe des Ländlers wird bestens zum Ausdruck gebracht. Die Rondo-Burleske kommt sehr burschikos daher und in der Dezidiertheit der Musik, positiv zu wirken, wird dann doch deutlich, dass das alles nur erzwungene Fassade ist, Galgenhumor, wie es Mengelberg formulierte. Der etwas stockende Beginn des letzten Satzes schließlich reißt uns sofort in die Weit des Abschieds zurück, die diese Symphonie wohl für Mahler bedeutete. In einem enormen Kraftakt lässt Kubelik Mahler im Adagio mindestens zehn Mal sterben. Selten ist mir dieser Satz so unter die Haut gegangen wie in dieser Aufnahme. Selten ist langsames Sterben musikalisch überzeugender und packender dargestellt worden als in dieser exzeptionellen Interpretation.
Wie schon in den Symphonien Nr. 1 und 5, die dieser Neunten vorausgingen, zeigt sich Raphael Kubelik auch in diesem Konzertmitschnitt wieder als

Die Presse
Die Presse | 15837 | Wilhelm Sinkovicz | December 1, 2000

Rafael Kubelik war einer der großen Vorkämpfer für die MahlerMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik war einer der großen Vorkämpfer für die Mahler

Crescendo
Crescendo | 12/2000 | TR | December 1, 2000

Mit zwei weiteren Konzertmitschnitten von Rafael Kubelik gelingt es AuditeMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mit zwei weiteren Konzertmitschnitten von Rafael Kubelik gelingt es Audite

Monde de la Musique
Monde de la Musique | Décembre 2000 | Patrick Szersnovicz | December 1, 2000

Passionnément admirée et commentée par Alban Berg, la Neuvième Symphonie (été 1909) qui commence, comme on l'a souvent dit, là où se leMehr lesen

Passionnément admirée et commentée par Alban Berg, la Neuvième Symphonie (été 1909) qui commence, comme on l'a souvent dit, là où se le termine Le Chant de la Terre est sans doute ce que Mahler a écrit de plus extraordinaire. Symphonie sur la mort, certes, mais non symphonie dans laquelle la mort est un souhait: on y trouve acceptation mais aussi défi, rage envers la lumière qui s'éteint, et profonde ambivalence. Son premier mouvement est la page la plus complexe et parfaite du compositeur, plus neuve que bien des compositions ultérieures de Schoenberg, Berg et Webern. Plus qu'ailleurs, les procédés techniques d'écriture épousant étroitement le contenu de la pensée musicale. L'ensemble de ce mouvement est traité mélodiquement, comme si ses quatre cent cinquante-quatre mesures n'étaient formées au fond que d'une seule et unique mélodie. Toutes les démarcations entre les périodes s'estompent ; les débuts de phrase n’excédant pas la durée d’une mesure se multiplient dans tout le mouvement. Le discours s’y ralentit légèrement, accompagné par la respiration lourde du « narrateur », l’avance presque pénible d’un récit qui porte, mesure par mesure, le fardeau de la progression symphonique.

Après une remarquable Cinquième Symphonie et une splendide Première (« Choc »), toutes deux enregistrées « live » à la Herkulessaal de la Résidence de Munich, Audite Schallplatten propose un nouvel inédit de ce cycle de concerts Mahler/Kubelik/Radio bavaroise, enregistré le 4 juin 1975 au Bunka Kaikan Concert Hall de Tokyo. Plus subtil, plus « libre » que dans son enregistrement de studio avec le même orchestre (DG), Rafael Kubelik offre une Neuvième Symphonie sobre, raffinée, exemplaire par la clarté, la mise en valeur de la complexité polyphonique et par une réflexion aiguë sur l’équilibre des tempos. Si les deux mouvements médians sont moins anguleux, oppressants que dans les deux versions de Bruno Walter ou qu’avec Klemperer, Horenstein, Ancerl, Mitropoulos, Sanderling, Abbado ou Bernstein/Concertgebouw, le sens de la respiration, de l’articulation dans l’essentiel premier mouvement et dans le finale aboutit à des résultats incisifs et étonnants, quoique bien différents et sans doute moins fiévreux que ceux des enregistrements de Barbirolli/Berlin (EMI) ou de Bernstein/Berlin (DG). Comme avec Karajan/Berlin « live » (DG, le must), mais sans atteindre le même souffle ni la même urgence visionnaire, chaque note, chaque timbre est pensé avec autant de souplesse que de rigueur, le discours traçant, dans un climat plus fantasmagorique que survolté, de longues lignes lyriques d’une poésie parfois presque minimaliste.
Passionnément admirée et commentée par Alban Berg, la Neuvième Symphonie (été 1909) qui commence, comme on l'a souvent dit, là où se le

Diapason
Diapason | Décembre 2000 | Katia Choquer | December 1, 2000

Captée lors d’un concert en 1982, cette Symphonie n° 2 par Kubelik est un intéressant témoignage sur l’évolution de la vision mahlérienne duMehr lesen

Captée lors d’un concert en 1982, cette Symphonie n° 2 par Kubelik est un intéressant témoignage sur l’évolution de la vision mahlérienne du chef. Celui-ci avait en effet gravé l’œuvre pour Deutsche Grammophon en 1969, avec le même orchestre qu’il dirigea pendant dix-huit ans et Edith Mathis. La distribution est donc quasiment identique, et pourtant, le résultat n’a rien de comparable. Le temps et l’âge semblent avoir estompé ces angles tranchants, cette urgence fébrile qui caractérisaient les interprétations de Kubelik. Non que le chef se soit assagi ou ait affadi son propos. Sa lecture est toujours empreinte d’un sens tragique remarquable mais il est désormais moins vindicatif. Le musicien interroge plus qu’il n’assène. Cela, en jouant sur une dynamique en perpétuel changement, sur l’ampleur impressionnante d’un orchestre titanesque, sur la densité des coloris déployés. Souvent on frôle le chaos. L’inquiétude, quant à elle, est omniprésente même dans les passages élégiaques. Le Mahler de Kubelik n’esquisse que de vague sourires, son visage est marqué par le désarroi. A peine croit-il à cette résurrection qu’il espère, sublime, aidé en cela par deux magnifiques chanteuses. Cette lecture vient donc ajouter une autre voix aux indispensables que sont les versions Walter (1985), Klemperer (1951) ou Mehta (1975) et nous fait redécouvrir un grand chef mahlérien.
Captée lors d’un concert en 1982, cette Symphonie n° 2 par Kubelik est un intéressant témoignage sur l’évolution de la vision mahlérienne du

www.buch.de
www.buch.de | 27.11.2000 | Olaf Behrens | November 27, 2000

Rafael Kubelik war einer der ersten, der die gesamten MahlersymphonienMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik war einer der ersten, der die gesamten Mahlersymphonien

Classica
Classica | Novembre 2000 | Luc Nevers | November 1, 2000

Après les Symphonies no 1, no 4 et no 5, captées en concert et qui nousMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Après les Symphonies no 1, no 4 et no 5, captées en concert et qui nous

Video Pratique
Video Pratique | Novembre-Decembre 2000 | Michel Jakubowicz | November 1, 2000

Captée à Tokyo en 1975, cette symphonie crépusculaire est l'ultimeMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Captée à Tokyo en 1975, cette symphonie crépusculaire est l'ultime

Süddeutsche Zeitung
Süddeutsche Zeitung | 13.10.2000 | Götz Thieme | October 13, 2000 Mahlers Welt

Kürzlich wurde in, einem englischen Fachblatt eine LeserbriefdebatteMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Kürzlich wurde in, einem englischen Fachblatt eine Leserbriefdebatte

Musikwoche
Musikwoche | 09.10.2000 | October 9, 2000

Neben Leonard Bernstein, Herbert von Karajan, Otto Klemperer oder BrunoMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Neben Leonard Bernstein, Herbert von Karajan, Otto Klemperer oder Bruno

Répertoire
Répertoire | Octobre 2000 | Jean-Marie Brohm | October 1, 2000

On doit à Kubelik une très belle, integrale Mahler (DG) avec l'OrchestreMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
On doit à Kubelik une très belle, integrale Mahler (DG) avec l'Orchestre

Monde de la Musique
Monde de la Musique | Septembre 2000 | Patrick Szersnovicz | September 1, 2000

Dans sa Première Symponie (1884-1888), Mahler ne s'oppose pas encore au poids formel de la tradition. Extérieurement, c'est, avec la SixièmeMehr lesen

Dans sa Première Symponie (1884-1888), Mahler ne s'oppose pas encore au poids formel de la tradition. Extérieurement, c'est, avec la Sixième Symphonie, la plus « traditionnelle » de Mahler, la seule à s'en tenir, dans sa version définitive, aux quatre types de mouvements fixés par Haydn, et l'une des rares à finir dans sa tonalité de départ. Pourtant les contrastes y jaillissent avec une grande violence, les maladresses y sont non déguisées, provocantes même jusqu'à un point où tristesse, dérision et impulsion vers l'idéal ne se distinguent plus vraiment.

Sans doute la plus grande « première symphonie » jamais écrite de l'Histoire, la Première est devenue la plus populaire - mais pas la plus facile d'accès - des symphonies de Mahler. Elle est plus que tout au????butaire d'une clarté très « antiformaIiste », malgré la nécessité sans doute plus architecturale que psychologique d'un finale s'opposant à lui seul au reste de l'oeuvre et imposant, sinon un réel déséquilibre, du moins une certaine rupture e ton. Evité pendant trois mouvements, le schéma romantique du « triomphe après la lutte » intervient au début de ce très long finale, nettement plus dramatique que le reste de l'oeuvre. La Première Symphonie expose sans les résoudre à peu près toutes les tensions de la musique mahlérienne à venir. Les contrastes appartiennent à un univers neuf, où la différence peut fonder l'identité.

Comme dans ses deux versions « officielles », avec la Philharmonie de Vienne (Decca, admirable, à rééditer) puis avec l'Orchestre symphonique de la Radio bavaroise (DG, octobre 1967), Rafael Kubelik, enregistré ici lors d'un concert donné le 2 novembre 1979 à la Herkulessaal de Munich avec l'Orchestre de la Radio bavaroise, conçoit la Première Symphonie « Titan » de façon plus « naturaliste » qu'intellectuelle. Il privilégie, avec un subtil rubato et des tempos plutôt vifs quoique lé????ent plus amples que ceux de l'enregistrement DG -, l'idée de percée, voire de déchirure, qui impose sa structure à l'oeuvre tout entière. Dans le développement du premier mouvement, à la fois puis sant et lumineux, la distanciation douloureuse devant J'éveil de la nature est aussi poétiquement traduite que chez Walter/Columbia (Sony), Ancerl (Supraphon), Horenstein (EMI), Giulini/Chicago (idem) ou Haitink/Berlin (Philips). Kubelik architecture les deux mouvements médians avec un tranchant des ligues, une saveur des timbres qui, pour être moins «cruels » que ceux d'Ancerl, de Bernstein/New York (Sony), de Kegel (Berlin Classics) ou de Haitink/Berlin, n'éludent aucun des aspects allusifs ou acerbes. Dans le finale, magnifique de cohérence, l'interprétation, souple et spontanée, devient plus extérieurement dramatique -c'est l'écriture elle-même qui le veut -, mais le chef parvient à l'unité tout en diversifiant à l'extrême les divers épisodes. Par son absence de grandiloquence, de pathos bon marché et sa, haute tenue stylistique, cette interprétation enregistrée « live » fait mentir la légende de lourdeur et de sentimentalité qui colle à l'oeuvre.
Dans sa Première Symponie (1884-1888), Mahler ne s'oppose pas encore au poids formel de la tradition. Extérieurement, c'est, avec la Sixième

Der Tagesspiegel
Der Tagesspiegel | 27.08.2000 | August 27, 2000 Der Schleier der Zeit

Historische Aufnahmen – wo setzt man sie an? Auch die 70er und 80er JahreMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Historische Aufnahmen – wo setzt man sie an? Auch die 70er und 80er Jahre

Der Tagesspiegel
Der Tagesspiegel | 27.08.2000 | August 27, 2000 Der Schleier der Zeit

Historische Aufnahmen – wo setzt man sie an? Auch die 70er und 80er JahreMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Historische Aufnahmen – wo setzt man sie an? Auch die 70er und 80er Jahre

www.buch.de
www.buch.de | August 2000 | Olaf Behrens | August 21, 2000

Die neunte Symphonie von Gustav Mahler ist seine Aschiedssymphonie. ErMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die neunte Symphonie von Gustav Mahler ist seine Aschiedssymphonie. Er

Classica
Classica | Juillet-Août 2000 | Maxim Lawrence | July 1, 2000

Ce label réédite dans d'excellentes conditions une gravure en public deMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ce label réédite dans d'excellentes conditions une gravure en public de

Répertoire
Répertoire | Juillet/Août 2000 | Pascal Brissaud | July 1, 2000

Ce concert nous fait redécouvrir à quel point Kubelik avait assimilé enMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ce concert nous fait redécouvrir à quel point Kubelik avait assimilé en

Audio
Audio | 7/2000 | Stefanie Lange | July 1, 2000

Die hervorragend remasterte Live-Aufnahme von Mahlers 1. Symphonie mitMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Die hervorragend remasterte Live-Aufnahme von Mahlers 1. Symphonie mit

Berlingske Tidende
Berlingske Tidende | 21.06.2000 | Steen Chr. Steensen | June 21, 2000 I Kubeliks forunderlige verden
To enestàende optageIser af dirigenten Rafael Kubelik med Mahlers 1. og 5. Symfoni. Klassiske plader

Arene med det bayerske radiosymfoniorkester horer til de gyldne for denMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Arene med det bayerske radiosymfoniorkester horer til de gyldne for den

Scala
Scala | 3/2000 | Attila Csampai | June 1, 2000 Kubeliks Naturbeschwörung

Wie Barbirolli verband auch den 1914 geborenen Prager Rafael Kubelik eineMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Wie Barbirolli verband auch den 1914 geborenen Prager Rafael Kubelik eine

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | 06/2000 | Rémy Franck | June 1, 2000 Kubelik mit Mahlers Erster

Nach einer exzeptionellen Fünften Gustav Mahlers mit dem Symphonieorchester des BR unter Kubelik legt Audite nun eine nicht minder begeisternde ErsteMehr lesen

Nach einer exzeptionellen Fünften Gustav Mahlers mit dem Symphonieorchester des BR unter Kubelik legt Audite nun eine nicht minder begeisternde Erste vor, die 1979 live im Münchner Herkulessaal aufgenommen wurde.

Kubelik, einer der großen Missionare der Mahler-Musik, hat Mahlers Erste in den Fünfzigerjahren mit den Wiener Philharmonikern und später in einer Studioproduktion im Rahmen des gesamten Mahler-Zyklus mit dem Symphoniorchester des BR für die DG erneut aufgenommen: beide Aufnahmen reichen an die zwingende und suggestive Interpretation, die auf der vorliegende CD festgehalten wurde, bei weitem nicht heran.

Die Naturlaute sind hier ebenso unmittelbar präsent wie die psychischen Erlebnisse des Helden, der Konflikt ist ebenso spürbar wie die Ruhe, die Ironie so ätzend wie die Gelöstheit wohltuend. Die Abgründe des letzten Satzes öffnen sich dramatisch die höllische Kraft der Musik erfasst den Zuhörer brutal. Kubelik akzentuiert das bedrohlich, um den Kontrast zum Traum vom Paradies noch aufregender und spannender zu gestalten.

Von den vielen guten Versionen dieser Symphonie, die ich kenne, ist dies zweifellos eine der besten. Das Phänomenale daran ist, dass sie auch dem, der das Werk gut kennt, neue Aspekte vermitteln kann... Eine Sternstunde!
Nach einer exzeptionellen Fünften Gustav Mahlers mit dem Symphonieorchester des BR unter Kubelik legt Audite nun eine nicht minder begeisternde Erste

Gramophone
Gramophone | June 2000 | Rob Cowan | June 1, 2000

... A more recent vintage of comparison was provided by two Audite releases of Mahler symphonies featuring the Bavarian Radio Symphony OrchestraMehr lesen

... A more recent vintage of comparison was provided by two Audite releases of Mahler symphonies featuring the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra conducted by Rafael Kubelik. Knowing David Gutman's hard line on Mahler performances. I was delighted to read his closing remarks. 'All in all, a breath of fresh Moravian air ...,' he wrote, '... and a wonderfully civilised alternative to the hi-tech histrionics of today's market leaders.' Too true. 'That the pulse has slowed just a little is all to the good...' says DG and again I'd concur, although the timing difference between the 1967 First Symphony (DG, 5/90) and this 1979 live version is more marked than you might at first expeet. Listening (and looking) reveals 50'0'' for Deutsche Grammophon and 51'33'' for Audite, but the addition of the first-movement repeat in 1968 cuts the DG timing by a further two minutes (at least in theory). The new Fifth is marked by the sort of 'rocketing' dynamic inflexions (notably among the woodwinds) that were typical of Kubelik's Munich heyday. You notice them, especially, at the start of the finale, but the birdsong charaterisations in the first movement of the First
Symphony are hardly less striking. Both Performances are deeply poetic (I second DG's positive response to the Adagietto), less dramatic, perhaps, in orchestral attack than their studio predecessors, but kindlier, softerhued and - in the closing minutes of the Fifth's stormy second movement - markedly more grand. ...
... A more recent vintage of comparison was provided by two Audite releases of Mahler symphonies featuring the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

Gramophone
Gramophone | June 2000 | Rob Cowan | June 1, 2000

... A more recent vintage of comparison was provided by two Audite releases of Mahler symphonies featuring the Bavarian Radio Symphony OrchestraMehr lesen

... A more recent vintage of comparison was provided by two Audite releases of Mahler symphonies featuring the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra conducted by Rafael Kubelik. Knowing David Gutman\'s hard line on Mahler performances. I was delighted to read his closing remarks. \'All in all, a breath of fresh Moravian air ...,\' he wrote, \'... and a wonderfully civilised alternative to the hi-tech histrionics of today\'s market leaders.\' Too true. \'That the pulse has slowed just a little is all to the good...\' says DG and again I\'d concur, although the timing difference between the 1967 First Symphony (DG, 5/90) and this 1979 live version is more marked than you might at first expeet. Listening (and looking) reveals 50\'0\'\' for Deutsche Grammophon and 51\'33\'\' for Audite, but the addition of the first-movement repeat in 1968 cuts the DG timing by a further two minutes (at least in theory). The new Fifth is marked by the sort of \'rocketing\' dynamic inflexions (notably among the woodwinds) that were typical of Kubelik\'s Munich heyday. You notice them, especially, at the start of the finale, but the birdsong charaterisations in the first movement of the First
Symphony are hardly less striking. Both Performances are deeply poetic (I second DG\'s positive response to the Adagietto), less dramatic, perhaps, in orchestral attack than their studio predecessors, but kindlier, softerhued and - in the closing minutes of the Fifth\'s stormy second movement - markedly more grand. ...
... A more recent vintage of comparison was provided by two Audite releases of Mahler symphonies featuring the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

Crescendo
Crescendo | Mai/Juni 2000 | TR | May 1, 2000

Mit zwei Live-Mitschnitten aus der Spätphase des großen Mahler-DirigentenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mit zwei Live-Mitschnitten aus der Spätphase des großen Mahler-Dirigenten

Crescendo
Crescendo | Mai/Juni 2000 | TR | May 1, 2000

Mit zwei Live-Mitschnitten aus der Spätphase des großen Mahler-DirigentenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mit zwei Live-Mitschnitten aus der Spätphase des großen Mahler-Dirigenten

Musik & Theater | Mai 2000 | Attila Csampai | May 1, 2000

Man möchte annehmen, dass Gustav Mahlers mittlerweile sehr populäre ErsteMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Man möchte annehmen, dass Gustav Mahlers mittlerweile sehr populäre Erste

Musikmarkt
Musikmarkt | 10.04.2000 | April 10, 2000

Gustav Mahlers Erste liegt in einer Liveaufnahme vom 2. November 1979 ausMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Gustav Mahlers Erste liegt in einer Liveaufnahme vom 2. November 1979 aus

Gramophone
Gramophone | April 2000 | David Gutmann | April 1, 2000 A pair of Mahler symphonies from the great Rafael Kubelik to complement his admired studio Mahler cycle

Rafael Kubelik\'s Mahler cycle (DG, 5/90) was a highlight of his period as chief conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (1961-79). It hasMehr lesen

Rafael Kubelik\'s Mahler cycle (DG, 5/90) was a highlight of his period as chief conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (1961-79). It has usually been well received in these pages, although, to some ears, his approach is too lightweight for this repertoire, offering 19th-century drama without 20th-century intensity. Which said, even the sceptics should try these attractive live performances, recorded a decade later than their DG studio equivalents. The scores may not be illuminated with keen strokes of interpretative novelty, but you won\'t find readings of greater warmth, humanity and patient sensitivity. That the pulse has slowed just a little is all to the good, and the more spacious sonic stage preserved by Bavarian Radio bathes the music-making in an appealing glow without serious loss of detail.

Kubelik made one of the earliest studio recordings of the First Symphony, with the Vienna Philharmonic for Decca in the 1950s (1/55 - nla), and, on the first appearance of his DG remake in 1968, Deryck Cooke observed that here was an essentially poetic conductor who gets more poetry out of this symphony than any of the other conductors who have recorded it. That is even truer of this 1979 account, Cooke\'s \'natural delicacy \' being the key to an interpretation that may offend latterday purists. Kubelik\'s divided violins may be back in vogue, but not his abandonment of the first movement exposition repeat; he also ignores the single repeat sign in the Landler. Does it matter that the mood seems somehow \'old-fashioned\' as well - more autumnal than spring-like? One can hardly fail to be struck by the rural calm and simplicity he brings to the dreamy opening, the freshness and piquancy of the bucolic details, the birdcalls, the unfussy phrasing.

In the second movement, Kubelik keeps the music moving, as Bernstein almost fails to, yet still manages to impart a decent swing, while his Trio is a delight. Nor does he fall short in the slow movement, giving himself more time than Bernstein to impose a different but equally compelling ethnic slant. Most modern interpretations, however crisply focused, sound painfully flat after this. Only in the finale does the conductor\'s natural expressiveness veer towards a rhythmic slackness that saps the music of the necessary drive. The second subject, however gorgeous, is consolatory rather than rapt or yearning, the total effect something less than sensational.

By contrast, the Fifth is one of those performances that acquires charisma as it goes along. The first two movements are by no means earth-shattering, relying on the resonant recording (not quite as refined as No 1) to add gravitas to some less than committed music-making. The Scherzo is altogether more distinctive, frisky and lithe, with excellent work from the Bavarian horns. As for the Adagietto, this must now take its place among the most affecting on disc. Partisans of extreme tempos, whether fast or slow, may not like it, but Kubelik finds exactly the right pace - which is, of course, the pace that feels right for him; and his strings are possessed of an unearthly radiance. The finale of this symphony almost invariably sounds too heavy. Not so here. The conductor\'s rhythmic verve will surprise anyone familiar with the arthritic flailing of his later years and the conclusion is suitably vigorous.

All in all, a breath of fresh Moravian air and a wonderfully civilised alternative to the hi-tech histrionics of today\'s market leaders. The First Symphony sounds even better and is probably the one to go for.
Rafael Kubelik\'s Mahler cycle (DG, 5/90) was a highlight of his period as chief conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (1961-79). It has

Gramophone
Gramophone | April 2000 | David Gutman | April 1, 2000 A pair of Mahler symphonies from the great Rafael Kubelik to complement his admired studio Mahler cycle

Rafael Kubelik\'s Mahler cycle (DG, 5/90) was a highlight of his period as chief conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (1961-79). It hasMehr lesen

Rafael Kubelik\'s Mahler cycle (DG, 5/90) was a highlight of his period as chief conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (1961-79). It has usually been well received in these pages, although, to some ears, his approach is too lightweight for this repertoire, offering 19th-century drama without 20th-century intensity. Which said, even the sceptics should try these attractive live performances, recorded a decade later than their DG studio equivalents. The scores may not be illuminated with keen strokes of interpretative novelty, but you won\'t find readings of greater warmth, humanity and patient sensitivity. That the pulse has slowed just a little is all to the good, and the more spacious sonic stage preserved by Bavarian Radio bathes the music-making in an appealing glow without serious loss of detail.

Kubelik made one of the earliest studio recordings of the First Symphony, with the Vienna Philharmonic for Decca in the 1950s (1/55 - nla), and, on the first appearance of his DG remake in 1968, Deryck Cooke observed that here was an essentially poetic conductor who gets more poetry out of this symphony than any of the other conductors who have recorded it. That is even truer of this 1979 account, Cooke\'s \'natural delicacy \' being the key to an interpretation that may offend latterday purists. Kubelik\'s divided violins may be back in vogue, but not his abandonment of the first movement exposition repeat; he also ignores the single repeat sign in the Landler. Does it matter that the mood seems somehow \'old-fashioned\' as well - more autumnal than spring-like? One can hardly fail to be struck by the rural calm and simplicity he brings to the dreamy opening, the freshness and piquancy of the bucolic details, the birdcalls, the unfussy phrasing.

In the second movement, Kubelik keeps the music moving, as Bernstein almost fails to, yet still manages to impart a decent swing, while his Trio is a delight. Nor does he fall short in the slow movement, giving himself more time than Bernstein to impose a different but equally compelling ethnic slant. Most modern interpretations, however crisply focused, sound painfully flat after this. Only in the finale does the conductor\'s natural expressiveness veer towards a rhythmic slackness that saps the music of the necessary drive. The second subject, however gorgeous, is consolatory rather than rapt or yearning, the total effect something less than sensational.

By contrast, the Fifth is one of those performances that acquires charisma as it goes along. The first two movements are by no means earth-shattering, relying on the resonant recording (not quite as refined as No 1) to add gravitas to some less than committed music-making. The Scherzo is altogether more distinctive, frisky and lithe, with excellent work from the Bavarian horns. As for the Adagietto, this must now take its place among the most affecting on disc. Partisans of extreme tempos, whether fast or slow, may not like it, but Kubelik finds exactly the right pace - which is, of course, the pace that feels right for him; and his strings are possessed of an unearthly radiance. The finale of this symphony almost invariably sounds too heavy. Not so here. The conductor\'s rhythmic verve will surprise anyone familiar with the arthritic flailing of his later years and the conclusion is suitably vigorous.

All in all, a breath of fresh Moravian air and a wonderfully civilised alternative to the hi-tech histrionics of today\'s market leaders. The First Symphony sounds even better and is probably the one to go for.
Rafael Kubelik\'s Mahler cycle (DG, 5/90) was a highlight of his period as chief conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (1961-79). It has

BBC Music Magazine
BBC Music Magazine | April 2000 | David Nice | April 1, 2000 Kubelik’s live 1981

Mahler Fifth is a reminder that you can have everything in Mahler – intricate texturing, characterful playing, purposeful phrasing and a cumulativeMehr lesen

Mahler Fifth is a reminder that you can have everything in Mahler – intricate texturing, characterful playing, purposeful phrasing and a cumulative impact which leaves you breathless with exhilaration. Only Bernstein, also captured before an audience, can do the same, and although Kubelik pulls some very theatrical stops out as the clouds part in the second movement and the light fades from the scherzo. His generally faster-moving picture tells a very different story.
Mahler Fifth is a reminder that you can have everything in Mahler – intricate texturing, characterful playing, purposeful phrasing and a cumulative

Applaus
Applaus | 4/2000 | Martina Kausch | April 1, 2000 Großes Staunen
Live-Mitschnitte von Mahler- und Mozart-Konzerten unter Rafael Kubelik beweisen einmal mehr den Rang des BR-Symphonie-Orchesters

Im Jubeljahr des 50-jährigen Bestehens ist die Edition von Aufnahmen desMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Im Jubeljahr des 50-jährigen Bestehens ist die Edition von Aufnahmen des

Applaus
Applaus | 4/2000 | Martina Kausch | April 1, 2000 Großes Staunen
Live-Mitschnitte von Mahler- und Mozart-Konzerten unter Rafael Kubelik beweisen einmal mehr den Rang des BR-Symphonie-Orchesters

Im Jubeljahr des 50-jährigen Bestehens ist die Edition von Aufnahmen desMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Im Jubeljahr des 50-jährigen Bestehens ist die Edition von Aufnahmen des

SWR
SWR | 17.03.2000 | Norbert Meuers | March 17, 2000

(Musikbeispiel: G. Mahler: Symphonie Nr. 1, I. Langsam: Schleppend. Wie einMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
(Musikbeispiel: G. Mahler: Symphonie Nr. 1, I. Langsam: Schleppend. Wie ein

Rondo
Rondo | 02.03.2000 | Thomas Schulz | March 2, 2000

Gemeinsam mit Bernstein war Rafael Kubelik einer der ersten Dirigenten, dieMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Gemeinsam mit Bernstein war Rafael Kubelik einer der ersten Dirigenten, die

Stereoplay
Stereoplay | März 2000 | Ulrich Schreiber | March 1, 2000

Im historischen Rückblick wächst die Hochachtung vor dem symphonischenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Im historischen Rückblick wächst die Hochachtung vor dem symphonischen

International Record Review
International Record Review | March 2000 | David Patmore | March 1, 2000

The specialist German label Audite has already released several recordings from Rafael Kubelik’s years as Chief Conductor of the Bavarian RadioMehr lesen

The specialist German label Audite has already released several recordings from Rafael Kubelik’s years as Chief Conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, including two valuable CDs of concerto recordings featuring Clifford Curzon. Here it turns its attention to Mahler, presenting a live recording from 1981 which complements Kubelik’s commercial recording of the Fifth Symphony with the same forces for DG.

Kubelik took charge of the Bavarian Radio orchestra in 1961, and so this particular performance is a product of the close relationship between conductor and orchestra which had developed over a period of 20 years. The result is a notable reading: Kubelik gets completely inside the music, creating a performance of exceptional drive and intensity. The second movement, for instance, has a truly demonic character. The subsequent Scherzo is equally powerful, and the famous Adagietto is strongly contrasted, with an atmosphere of great repose. Only in the final movement does Kubelik’s intensity start to diminish. Taken as a whole, however, this performance represents a definite development on Kubelik’s earlier studio recording. It places his interpretation strongly within the expressionistic style of Mahler conducting, as epitomized most powerfully by Leonard Bernstein and Klaus Tennstedt.

The Bavarian orchestra plays with great eloquence, commitment and virtuosity, not least in the second movement, which constitutes the emotional core of Kubelik’s stormy view of the work. The only drawback, which does give cause for concern in this particular work but which presumably reflects the conductor’s intentions, is an at times raucous first trumpet.

As was so often the case, the Bavarian Radio recording of a performance in the Herkulessaal is a model of refinement. It presents an excellent overall aural picture, with wide perspective, in which all the strands of Mahler’s complex symphonic argument can be clearly heard without any artificial highlighting.

In sum, this recording, supported by brief but pertinent documentation is a valuable document of Kubelik’s later years, of his relationship with the orchestra with which he worked for the longest period of his whole career, and of a truly memorable interpretation of music clearly close to his heart.
The specialist German label Audite has already released several recordings from Rafael Kubelik’s years as Chief Conductor of the Bavarian Radio

Coburger Tagesblatt
Coburger Tagesblatt | 29.02.2000 | February 29, 2000

Mahler-Wegbereiter: Rafael Kubelik ist einer der entscheidenden WegbereiterMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Mahler-Wegbereiter: Rafael Kubelik ist einer der entscheidenden Wegbereiter

WDR 3
WDR 3 | 03.02.2000 | Michael Schwalb | February 3, 2000

(Musikbeispiel: G. Mahler: Symphonie Nr. 1, I. Langsam: Schleppend. Wie einMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
(Musikbeispiel: G. Mahler: Symphonie Nr. 1, I. Langsam: Schleppend. Wie ein

Bergstädter Anzeiger
Bergstädter Anzeiger | 02.02.2000 | hol | February 2, 2000

Dem tschechischen Dirigenten Rafael Kubelik ist eine der bedeutendstenMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Dem tschechischen Dirigenten Rafael Kubelik ist eine der bedeutendsten

Pizzicato
Pizzicato | Febr. 2000 | Rémy Franck | February 1, 2000 Kubelik mit Mahlers Fünfter

Gut, dass hin und wieder an die Rolle Rafael Kubeliks in der Verbreitung der Werke Gustav Mahlers erinnert wird. Diese Aufnahme ist umso erfreulicher,Mehr lesen

Gut, dass hin und wieder an die Rolle Rafael Kubeliks in der Verbreitung der Werke Gustav Mahlers erinnert wird. Diese Aufnahme ist umso erfreulicher, weil sie uns eine Fünfte beschert, deren Ausdrucks-Spannweite erheblich größer ist als in der Studio-Einspielung bei DG. Diese sorgsam erarbeitete und sehr spontan und intensiv musizierte Symphonie fließt von der ersten bis zur letzten Minute, ohne dass die Spannung und die Kraft der Musik auch nur kurzfristig abnehmen. Das ist leidenschaftliches Musizieren ohne Exzesse, hin und wieder, besonders im ersten Satz etwas grün und frisch, stets erfüllt und, wenn notwendig, auch nachsinnend-ernst. Ein absoluter Höhepunkt ist das hingebungsvoll gespielte Adagietto, zum Sterben schön der Übergang zum Rondo-Finale, das man selten so musikantisch, so voller Charme und voller Poesie gehört hat.

Eine hinreißend schöne Interpretation, die man wärmstens empfehlen muss.
Gut, dass hin und wieder an die Rolle Rafael Kubeliks in der Verbreitung der Werke Gustav Mahlers erinnert wird. Diese Aufnahme ist umso erfreulicher,

Die Presse
Die Presse | 21.01.2000 | Wilhelm Sinkovicz | January 21, 2000

Rafael Kubelik war ein fulminanter Mahler-Interpret. Sein Nachruhm steht imMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik war ein fulminanter Mahler-Interpret. Sein Nachruhm steht im

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | 01.01.2000 | Victor Carr Jr. | January 1, 2000

This Kubelik Mahler Two is the latest in Audite\'s series of live BavarianMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
This Kubelik Mahler Two is the latest in Audite\'s series of live Bavarian

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | 01.01.2000 | David Hurwitz | January 1, 2000

Rafael Kubelik was one of this century\'s great conductors, and hisMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik was one of this century\'s great conductors, and his

fermate
fermate | Januar 2000 | Christoph Dohr | January 1, 2000

Das Spezialitäten-Label audite mit Sitz in Ostfildern wertet seit einigerMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Das Spezialitäten-Label audite mit Sitz in Ostfildern wertet seit einiger

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | 01.01.2000 | David Hurwitz | January 1, 2000

This live Mahler Sixth sheds less light on Kubelik's way with the musicMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
This live Mahler Sixth sheds less light on Kubelik's way with the music

Répertoire
Répertoire | Janvier 2000 | Christophe Huss | January 1, 2000

On doute quelque peu au début, pendant cinq minutes environ. Puis laMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
On doute quelque peu au début, pendant cinq minutes environ. Puis la

www.ClassicsToday.com
www.ClassicsToday.com | 01.01.2000 | David Hurwitz | January 1, 2000

Rafael Kubelik enjoyed making recordings, particularly of MahlerMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik enjoyed making recordings, particularly of Mahler

Musikmarkt
Musikmarkt | 06.12.1999 | December 6, 1999

Kubelik trug als Chef des Sinfonieorchesters des Bayerischen RundfunksMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Kubelik trug als Chef des Sinfonieorchesters des Bayerischen Rundfunks

HMV Classic Information
HMV Classic Information | December \'99 - Vol. 29 | Mitsuaki Sakamoto | December 1, 1999 Bekanntmachung des HMV Grand Prix!

Für die „HMV Classical Awards“ werden von zuständigen Personen derMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Für die „HMV Classical Awards“ werden von zuständigen Personen der

Bayerische Staatszeitung
Bayerische Staatszeitung | 13.06.1968 | aw | June 13, 1971

Ein künstlerisches Ereignis schon als Begebenheiten: denn das '1904Mehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Ein künstlerisches Ereignis schon als Begebenheiten: denn das '1904

Süddeutsche Zeitung
Süddeutsche Zeitung | 22.04.1967 | Karl Schumann | April 22, 1971

Rafael Kubelik besitzt das, was weder die flotteste Schlagtechnik noch derMehr lesen

Aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen dürfen wir ihnen diese Rezension leider nicht zeigen!
Rafael Kubelik besitzt das, was weder die flotteste Schlagtechnik noch der

News

date /
Typ
title
Rating
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Pizzicato
Zwei Mahler-Welten
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Gramophone
... A more recent vintage of comparison was provided by two Audite releases of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Gramophone
A pair of Mahler symphonies from the great Rafael Kubelik to complement his admired studio Mahler cycle
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Rondo
Lorbeer + Zitronen
Jul 3, 2005
Review

fermate
Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks wäre...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Bergstädter Anzeiger
Dem tschechischen Dirigenten Rafael Kubelik ist eine der bedeutendsten...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Die Presse
Rafael Kubelik war ein fulminanter Mahler-Interpret. Sein Nachruhm steht im...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Musikmarkt
Kubelik trug als Chef des Sinfonieorchesters des Bayerischen Rundfunks...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Stereoplay
Im historischen Rückblick wächst die Hochachtung vor dem symphonischen...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Pizzicato
Kubelik mit Mahlers Fünfter
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.buch.de
Es muß schon ein wirklich großes Konzertereignis in München gewesen sein, als...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Crescendo
Mit zwei Live-Mitschnitten aus der Spätphase des großen Mahler-Dirigenten...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Der Tagesspiegel
Der Schleier der Zeit
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Applaus
Großes Staunen
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Classic Record Collector
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Fono Forum
Mahler ohne Manierismen
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Répertoire
Après les Symphonies Nos 1, 2, 5, 7 et 9, Audite poursuit la publication des...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Le Monde de la Musique
L’immense Troisième Symphonie (1895-1896), vision panthéiste embrassant...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

SWR
(Hörprobe: CD 2, Track 2 – 2’30, bei 1’30 mit Text drüber) - Ein...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Fono Forum
Sogkraft
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.buch.de
Für jeden Mahler - Liebhaber sind die Liveeinspielungen der Symphonien mit dem...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Badische Zeitung
... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

International Record Review
Despite the (necessary!) tailing off in complete cycles over the last decade,...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

International Record Review
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Westfalen-Blatt
Eine schlichte schwarze Blechplatte ziert seit wenigen Tagen das Arbeitszimmer...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Fanfare
Like Audite’s disc of Kubelik’s Mahler Sixth (reviewed in 25:5), this...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.musicweb-international.com
The last time I reviewed a recording of Mahler’s Third Symphony I stated again...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Die Rheinpfalz
Idealer Interpret – Livemitschnitte unter Rafael Kubelik
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.new-classics.co.uk
The renowned Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Women’s Chorus, conducted...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

klassik.com
Der Visionär
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Berlingske Tidende
I Kubeliks forunderlige verden
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.musicweb-international.com
Kubelik's Mahler credentials have long been established ever since his...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Fono Forum
Sogkraft
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Répertoire
La même cas de figure se reproduit à l’encontre de Kubelik, dont au moins...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Badische Zeitung
... Wie spezifisch, ja wie radikal sich Gielens Mahler ausnimmt, erhellt...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

International Record Review
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.musicweb-international.com
Unlike the Audite release of Rafael Kubelik conducting Mahler’s First Symphony...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Die Rheinpfalz
Idealer Interpret – Livemitschnitte unter Rafael Kubelik
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Gramophone
Undercharcterised Mahler from Kubelik
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.ClassicsToday.com
This live Mahler Sixth sheds less light on Kubelik's way with the music than...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Classic Record Collector
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

klassik.com
Das Label Audite setzt mit vorliegender Aufnahme die erfolgreiche Reihe der...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Campus Mag
Ecrite en 1903, cette 6ème symphonie sur les 9 composées par Mahler est la...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Video Pratique
Une symphonie marquée par le désespoir absolu, d'une noirceur totale,...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.ClassicsToday.com
Rafael Kubelik was one of this century\'s great conductors, and his recordings...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Monde de la Musique
Volet central de la grande trilogie instrumentale mahlérienne, la Sixième...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Bayerische Staatszeitung
Ein künstlerisches Ereignis schon als Begebenheiten: denn das '1904 entstandene...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Rondo
Lorbeer + Zitronen
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Rondo
Als die Zuhörer am Nikolaustag des Jahres 1968 im Münchner Herkulessaal diese...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Das Orchester
Zeit seines Lebens wurde Mahler seitens der Kritiker als größenwahnsinnig und...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Applaus
Großes Staunen
Jul 3, 2005
Review

HMV Classic Information
Bekanntmachung des HMV Grand Prix!
Jul 3, 2005
Review

fermate
Das Spezialitäten-Label audite mit Sitz in Ostfildern wertet seit einiger Zeit...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

International Record Review
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Répertoire
Ce concert nous fait redécouvrir à quel point Kubelik avait assimilé en...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

International Record Review
The specialist German label Audite has already released several recordings from...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

BBC Music Magazine
Kubelik’s live 1981
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Classica
Ce label réédite dans d'excellentes conditions une gravure en public de la...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Fanfare
According to the booklet that accompanies this release, Audite has released an...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Pizzicato
Kubelik mit impulsivem Mahler
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Neue Musikzeitung
Dass man Kubeliks Mahler-Zyklus auf CD neu veröffentlicht, kann man nur...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.ClassicsToday.com
After slogging through Claudio Abbado's dismal, wretchedly recorded (live)...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

SWR
(Musikbeispiel: G. Mahler: Symphonie Nr. 1, I. Langsam: Schleppend. Wie ein...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.musicweb-international.com
For many Mahlerites over a certain age Rafael Kubelik has always been there,...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.ClassicsToday.com
Rafael Kubelik enjoyed making recordings, particularly of Mahler symphonies,...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Berlingske Tidende
I Kubeliks forunderlige verden
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Monde de la Musique
Dans sa Première Symponie (1884-1888), Mahler ne s'oppose pas encore au poids...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Répertoire
On doit à Kubelik une très belle, integrale Mahler (DG) avec l'Orchestre de la...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Classic Record Collector
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Gramophone
... A more recent vintage of comparison was provided by two Audite releases of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Gramophone
A pair of Mahler symphonies from the great Rafael Kubelik to complement his admired studio Mahler cycle
Jul 3, 2005
Review

klassik.com
Verzweiflungseinbrüche und psychotische Aufwallungen, wie sie in der Partitur...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

klassik.com
Da dirigiert natürlich ein grosser Mahler- Dirigent, das weiß man, dass hört...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Rondo
Lorbeer + Zitronen
Jul 3, 2005
Review

WDR 3
(Musikbeispiel: G. Mahler: Symphonie Nr. 1, I. Langsam: Schleppend. Wie ein...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Luxemburger Wort
Rafael Kubelik gehörte zu den Dirigenten, die sich schon für die Sinfonik...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Rondo
Gemeinsam mit Bernstein war Rafael Kubelik einer der ersten Dirigenten, die...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Coburger Tagesblatt
Mahler-Wegbereiter: Rafael Kubelik ist einer der entscheidenden Wegbereiter der ...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Scala
Kubeliks Naturbeschwörung
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Audio
Die hervorragend remasterte Live-Aufnahme von Mahlers 1. Symphonie mit Rafael...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Crescendo
Mit zwei Live-Mitschnitten aus der Spätphase des großen Mahler-Dirigenten...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Pizzicato
Kubelik mit Mahlers Erster
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Musik & Theater
Man möchte annehmen, dass Gustav Mahlers mittlerweile sehr populäre Erste...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Der Tagesspiegel
Der Schleier der Zeit
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Musikmarkt
Gustav Mahlers Erste liegt in einer Liveaufnahme vom 2. November 1979 aus dem...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Die Rheinpfalz
Die Erste mit Kubelik
Jul 3, 2005
Review

www.buch.de
Die Mahler - Interpretationen von Rafael Kubelik haben in den Live Einspielungen...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Süddeutsche Zeitung
Mahlers Welt
Jul 3, 2005
Review

fermate
Ohne Rafael Kubelik und das Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks wäre...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Die Presse
Die Edition der Live-Mitschnitte der Münchner Mahler-Konzerte Rafael Kubeliks...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

International Record Review
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Fono Forum
Mahler ohne Manierismen
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Classic Record Collector
The German firm Audite has given us not only this near complete live cycle of...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Süddeutsche Zeitung
Rafael Kubelik besitzt das, was weder die flotteste Schlagtechnik noch der...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Rondo
Lorbeer + Zitronen
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Pizzicato
Überraschungen mit Kubelik
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Le Monde de la Musique
Réalisé en public à la Herkulessaal à Munich, cet enregistrement plonge...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Le Monde de la Musique
Première des symphonies de Mahler à utiliser les voix, la Deuxième Symphonie...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Opéra International
Au nombre des grands chefs mahlériens, à côté des Klemperer, Walter ou...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Diapason
Captée lors d’un concert en 1982, cette Symphonie n° 2 par Kubelik est un...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Classica
Suite de l’intégrale (après les Symphonies n°1, n°4, n°5 et n° 9) en...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Video Pratique
Mahler, le visionnaire, ne pouvait qu’être tenté de mettre en musique le...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Musikmarkt
Die Liveaufzeichnung entstand 1982 mit dem Symphonie-Orchester und dem Chor des...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Stuttgarter Zeitung
Aus vergangenen Zeiten – Rafael Kubelik dirigiert Mahlers zweite...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Zeitpunkt Studentenführer
„Wie mit einem Schlag sind alle Schleusen in mir geöffnet!“ – solches...
Jul 3, 2005
Review

Pizzicato
Als Rafael Kubelik 1982 Mahlers zweite Symphonie dirigierte, war er 68 Jahre...